1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Reasons why New York Sucks

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Manton, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,334
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    You don't know how many times i've been here and where I've been. Regardless, it doesn't make it any less true.
     
  2. archetypal_yuppie

    archetypal_yuppie Senior member

    Messages:
    2,877
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    I spent spring break in Cabo San Lucas once. Third world countries are ROUGH.
     
  3. tropics

    tropics Senior member

    Messages:
    1,199
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Location:
    Brooklyn NY / Cork IE
    

    haven't you mentioned before that you don't really like vacations and travelling, prefer to go to work? i may be mixing you up with someone else.
     
  4. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

    Messages:
    2,247
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009

    wut?




    But I do get the point. Well, that one, anyway. You are willing to pay more because the drink comes with an experience. But you have to pay more because the jazz club can engage in a species of monopoly pricing. Paying more does not enhance your experience (pace Veblen). In fact, if you feel you got ripped off for drinks, you will enjoy the experience a good deal less.

    Housing should not work that way. Yet, for a variety of regulatory and historical reasons, a lot of people in NY end up with housing that would be considered substandard and/or overpriced anywhere else in the country. While NY landlords are not, of course, monopolists, there are a variety of supply restrictions that conspire to create a similar effect. The wonderful experience of living in NY would be even more wonderful if, say, your rent/mortgage was 30% cheaper so that you had even more disposable income to enjoy all the many wonderful things that NY has to offer.


    I have to say I'm a little bemused by the hostility this is generating in some quarters. I would have thought that a thread called "Reasons Why New York Sucks" would be just the place for slightly idiotic rants.  


    The point . . . well, in that there ever was a serious point in what was originally light persiflage . . . is that New Yorkers get used to what would be intolerable conditions elsewhere and come to accept them as normal. It's not the Stockholm Syndrome. It's the Hedonic Treadmill.
     
  5. poorsod

    poorsod Senior member

    Messages:
    4,057
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2005
    NYC is good for some but worse for others.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/28/m...rk-is-not-affordable.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

     
    1 person likes this.
  6. NickCarraway

    NickCarraway Senior member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2014
  7. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    36,650
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    The jazz club does not engage in practices that are any more monopolistic than the dive bar. They function the same way. Assuming we're talking about a jazz bar where you do not pay admission, the price you pay for your drink there includes the experience, location, being surrounded by a set of people - all that you may enjoy more than a dive bar. Which is why you're willing to pay more for that same exact drink. Neither engages in any form of monopoly pricing - any consumer can choose to not have that drink in either place and have it somewhere else.
     
    2 people like this.
  8. ter1413

    ter1413 Senior member

    Messages:
    18,044
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Location:
    Central Booking
  9. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,334
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    

    You also moved from NYC to Houston, Texas.


    I don't like the process of traveling, but once I am there I like it. Also, this isn't a pure "vacation" I have been working for my normal job and doing board duties for a not-for-profit out here.
     
  10. ter1413

    ter1413 Senior member

    Messages:
    18,044
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Location:
    Central Booking
    

    :brick::brick::brick:
     
  11. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

    Messages:
    19,385
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    I don't fear flying at all. I fear airports.
     
  12. NickCarraway

    NickCarraway Senior member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2014
    It's called captive pricing.
     
  13. Britalian

    Britalian Senior member

    Messages:
    2,652
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2006
    Location:
    Italy.
  14. archetypal_yuppie

    archetypal_yuppie Senior member

    Messages:
    2,877
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    

    Yeah, I'd had enough of NYC's "third world"* standard of living. This is the "reasons NY sucks" thread right? :)

    *The term "third world" is a misnomer, since its origin/initial meaning was to indicate non-aligned countries - countries aligned with neither the U.S. or the U.S.S.R. strategically. Nothing to do with standard of living, etc. It is generally used differently now.
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

    Messages:
    21,825
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    
    No, you don't. Nor do you understand the term "monopoly pricing". It's no more monopoly pricing than the price of a Honda Versa embodies "monopoly pricing" because you can't buy a Versa from anyone other than Nissan. It just reflects basic economics.
    Also, you may want to re-read the Veblen Wikipedia entry if you think referencing Veblen says anything about the subjective experiences of individual market participants.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2015
  16. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

    Messages:
    2,247
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Yes, I know. But don't get all business economics-y. It seems to upset people.



    Sigh

    Nope, sorry. Cars -- and a great many other things -- are examples of substitute goods. If the price of a Nissan Versa gets too high, you can buy a similar car from Honda or some other company. Even though these goods would not be identical, they still compete with each other. So, while it is true that you can only buy a Versa from Nissan, Nissan can't successfully engage in monopoly pricing.

    But suppose once you buy your Nissan Versa, you discover that the only oil filter that will fit it is produced by Nissan and there is no after-market oil filter that will fit. Since you must buy oil filters and you must buy them from Nissan, Nissan can charge a packet for their oil filters, several times what a "generic" oil filter would cost in an open, competitive market. And if you don't believe that this sort of thing actually happens, you have never owned a printer.

    So, yes, both the jazz club and Nissan do engage in a species of monopoly pricing. It is, indeed what is called "captive pricing", as the poster above pointed out. Perhaps I should have just called it that rather than referring to it as a "species of monopoly pricing" but I was trying to avoid using too much jargon. Apparently, I used too much as it was.


    Sigh again

    Veblen goods are goods that become more desirable as they become more expensive. By contrast, for most things, demand goes up as the price goes down. Drinks in a club are, typically, not Veblen goods because people would drink more if the prices were lower.


    I don't get NYC politics at all. Why would a Democrat want to bribe people so he could run as a Republican in NYC? If you couldn't get elected as a Democrat, why would you think you would have a better chance as a Republican? Plus, switching like that would destroy your career. Has this guy never heard of Arlen Specter?
     
  17. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    36,650
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    Once again there is no difference in the economics of the Jazz bar vs the dive bar. Neither is monopolistic (one can choose which vendor to buy a drink from) or even captive priced (razor blades). They're both perfect example of clear cut supply and demand. If they were on a street right next to each other, people's willingness to pay for the same beer in both places would be different. One is willingly paying more for the same product in two different environments/experiences. No arm-twisting necessary, because one pays for the experience as well as the product consumed. Is it really that hard to understand?
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2015
    2 people like this.
  18. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    41,568
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    

    I take it you've never heard of Michael Bloomberg?
     
  19. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

    Messages:
    2,247
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Something for your commute this afternoon. Maybe this will be a happier topic than the NYC housing stock.

    Germs of the New York Subway

    Some highlights,




    Touché.
     
  20. Mulan

    Mulan Senior member

    Messages:
    1,357
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2014
    Location:
    On the move
    Looks like Peter Parker, and Batman's got a new villain soon to reveal it self.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by