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Reading thread

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by rjbman, Feb 16, 2013.

  1. GraphicNovelty

    GraphicNovelty Senior member

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    Finished YPU, enjoyed it quite a bit.

    Starting The Windup Girl now.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. Nikos

    Nikos Senior member

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    Is it really that good?
    I have it but I haven't tried it because, to be honest, I found V rather hard.
    And I have read several complex books.
     
  3. rjbman

    rjbman Senior member

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    Snow Crash is probably in my top 10, and I've read a few of Stephenson (Cryptonomicon, Anathem, and Reamde). The only one I didn't love was Reamde. I look forward to his next book regardless.

    Are Diamond Age and Baroque Cycle worth reading?
     
  4. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

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    Gravity's Rainbow or the companion? I found the companion a little dry, but it's worth it, I guess. :D If you meant the novel, I'd say just read a preview chapter or something, and proceed if you're enchanted. I actually thought V was much better-written on a sentence and plot level (still complex and allusive, but in a more engaging, less perfunctory way).
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2013
  5. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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    TWG is fucking quality.


    Yes, IMO.


    Just finished Caliban's War - quality read. I thought it was a fair follow up, highly entertaining, made good use of the mechanics available (still one of the most 'accurate' SF novels in terms of low g/micro g/etc) - characters were interesting (except Avarasala, who I thought was just a type cast).

    :)
     
  6. GraphicNovelty

    GraphicNovelty Senior member

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    Actually, put the Windup Girl on Hold to read Jesus' Son by Denis Johnson on a recommendation.

    Really, really good. But short (i'm already almost halfway through it).
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2013
  7. Nikos

    Nikos Senior member

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    Yes, I meant the actual novel. I've been meaning to read it for a while, but I never get around to it.
    I liked V, but felt I had to be very focused, so it is still in my growing half-read list.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. fireflygrave

    fireflygrave Senior member

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    Okay I told myself I was gonna do something different for the next book, but I'm just jumping straight to more Murakami. I can't stop :nodding:
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  9. artishard116

    artishard116 Senior member

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    I put it off in favor of the weirder ones but i'm enjoying Norwegian wood right now.
     
  10. dotcomzzz

    dotcomzzz Senior member

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    Zak Smith's illustrations of Gravity's Rainbow. Knowing somebody did that made reading the book a little easier :) started "The Recognitions" from Gaddis, speaking of heavy hitters. We'll see. Want to know if it's as good as people say.
     
    2 people like this.
  11. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

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    The William Gass intro is worth the price alone. :slayer:

    Come to think of it, his intro to Anatomy of Melancholy as well as his own In the Heart of the Heart of the Country were really amazing too, like you can just tell instantly they are the product of reading vast libraries and writing non-stop for the last fifty years. I guess this might be relevant because the two authors are very often confused.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  12. ManofKent

    ManofKent Senior member

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  13. wogbog

    wogbog Senior member

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    I started Vonnegut's Hocus Pocus for my work break reading. It's grumpier and more beautiful than his other stuff that I've read.
     
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  14. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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    Love God Bless You, Mr. Roswater and Welcome to the Monkey House - how's Hocus Pocus compare?
     
  15. Portland Dry Goods

    Portland Dry Goods Senior member

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    late to my own party!

    GR is definately worth picking up and dont get discouraged if it seems like nonsense. my strategy reading it for the first time was to localize some of the smaller stories and anecdotes within it and appreciate them one at a time. its a bit less alienating if you break it up that way or coast through and enjoy what grasps you. rereading it will always bring missed moments to the table. if you wanna mine the book then the companion is likely to be valuable but theres some fun stories (within stories [within stories]) that can be appreciated without a dissertation.

    V. is great but I think Crying Lot of 49 is the best introduction to Pynchon. its shorter than most of his books but its got the same level of wit. makes for a good beach read
     
  16. ManofKent

    ManofKent Senior member

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    Just finished Dave Egger's 'You shall know our velocity'.

    It had it's moments, there's a half decent book struggling to get out.
    I couldn't relate to the characters in any meaningful way so I didn't really care about them. There's the odd passage where the author managed to engage me in events, but generally it read like a teenage fan of Kerouac trying to do their own pastiche, and failing badly.
     
  17. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

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    I enjoyed Hocus Pocus, although it wasn't my favourite. It's a bit difficult to choose a 'best' Vonnegut book, as they are all good. I think that the ones that I enjoyed most, and which I like to dip back into from time to time, are "Mother Night", "Cat's Cradle" and "Bluebeard".


    I agree that "The Crying of Lot 49" is a good introduction to Pynchon. It's funny, interesting, and as PDG said, it's not too long. Vineland, whilst longer, is also enjoyable. I must admit that I really found it a bit hard to get into Gravity's Rainbow at first and so I put it down for quite some time before picking it up again and finishing it.



    Agreed. There are a few, younger authors like Eggers out there at present, and I think that their books could have done with some good editing.

    I've found Jonathan Safran Foer's writing to be similar to that of Eggers - technically very good, but at times a bit of a confused pastiche that could have done with some good editing. Particularly Foer's "Everything is Illuminated", which was like two books in one and it couldn't make up its mind as to whether it was being a serious and yet sometimes witty novel, or an attempt at "magical realism". To my mind, the two clashed very jarringly at times.

    In terms of Eggers, I preferred "What is the what" and "Zeitoun".
     
  18. Nikos

    Nikos Senior member

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    Funny you should mention this, as I was recently told it is too pretentious to read Pynchon on the beach, oh well.
    Thanks for the tip though, I will try the Crying Lot of 49. It sounds like the one I should read (I first need to find out what is happening with those vomit zombies in Leviathan Wakes though).
     
  19. feinschmecker

    feinschmecker Member

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    [​IMG]


    This is an amazing book about two sons who are trying to figure out just who their dad really was. On the surface, he was an accomplished painter who created an artwork coveted by European museums. But after he dies, there's a key piece missing from his masterwork and from his life. An enigmatic thriller that's impossible to put down.
     
  20. robinsongreen68

    robinsongreen68 Senior member

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    +1 on the crying of lot 49 being the best intro to pynchon. GR is still the really great novel though, for all its faults. just the first paragraph makes the hair on my arms stand up (wasn't this nabokov's sure-fire test of great prose?) , and the companion is definitely worth buying, there are so many arcane references you would never get otherwise- not that you need them to enjoy the book but it adds extra layers.

    has anybody read 'against the day'? I'm lazily mid-way through and enjoying it a lot more than i expected...
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2013

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