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Reading thread

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by rjbman, Feb 16, 2013.

  1. dotcomzzz

    dotcomzzz Well-Known Member

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    Read CivilWarLand in Bad Decline. Really good stuff.
     
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  2. t3hg0suazn

    t3hg0suazn Well-Known Member

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    East of Eden is one of my favorite books. Only other Steinbeck I read so far is Grapes of Wrath, and I liked Eden more. So much wisdom in there. Lee is my favorite (it helps he's asian).

    Recently read:
    Down and Out in Paris & London -- saw this in RFT a while ago. Short read, I liked the Paris part but not really the London stuff. Pretty shocking that this stuff actually happened. I hope it's better nowadays but you never know what's hidden from you eh?

    Gentlemen Bastards: Lies of Locke Lamora (#1) and Red skies under red seas (#2). Pretty fun read, wasn't super big fan of writing style (kind of flashbacks every other chapter) but great characters and who doesn't like heists? Contemplating reading the third.

    Mistborn Trilogy: just a really solid epic fantasy series. The magic and world-building were really well thought out, and I'm not really a LOTR / GoT book person (just wait for movie/tv). Each book has its only focus but they all come together in the end as well. The books discuss love, leadership, politics, and faith in very thorough, well-thought ways.


    Currently reading Blood Song (Raven's Shadow #1). It is pretty sweet so far.

    Feeling a little guilty just reading loads of epic fantasies. Might rotate in Atlas Shrugged for some variety.
     
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  3. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Well-Known Member

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    lol @ Atlas Shrugged.

    Epic fantasies are more mature than Rand.

    It's worth reading to brag and criticise, sort of, but it's essentially a 1000 page defense of selfishness.

    Smash out Name of the Wind (Rothfuss, epic fantasy) instead, 1000000x more soul and 100000000000000000x more intellectually stimulating than Atlas Shrugged.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2014
  4. FlyingMonkey

    FlyingMonkey Well-Known Member

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    Or Nova, Babel-17, Stars in my Pocket Like Grains of Sand...? I'd rate Dhalgren as his most satisfying work, but then I like twisty experimental stuff.

    I'm currently reading the new translation of the full and uncensored version of the Strugatsky brothers' Definitely Maybe. I've been remembering how much I love their work recently.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  5. t3hg0suazn

    t3hg0suazn Well-Known Member

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    Haha Name of the Wind is what got me started on this epic fantasy binge -- eagerly awaiting the third book! Some review on goodreads described Blood Song as a better version of Name of the Wind. Not sure if I'd say better (only 50% through) but it's very good - same story of the past from frame of the present, "coming of age", but less magic and "science" and more fighting.

    Re: Atlas Shrugged, I am a very self person, so I may need the justification :) That and, there's only finitely many good epic fantasies out there.
     
  6. GraphicNovelty

    GraphicNovelty Well-Known Member

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    Name of the wind is fun because it's a bit different. Like, it's the development of every D&D deus ex machina character
     
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  7. GraphicNovelty

    GraphicNovelty Well-Known Member

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    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old's life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
    —John Rogers
     
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  8. cyc wid it

    cyc wid it Well-Known Member

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    The early Dragonlance books were the best.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2014
  9. t3hg0suazn

    t3hg0suazn Well-Known Member

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    finished Blood Song. I'd say it's just as good as name of the wind - also made me lose sleep to finish. less deus ex machina and more badassery. I was afraid the ending would be too cliffhangery, but it made a solid standalone book, most questions answers but some deeper ones remaining. looking forward to Tower Lord (book 2) release July 1!
     
  10. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Well-Known Member

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    I'm in an epic fantasy place right now. When it happens I just got to run with it.
     
  11. Superb0bo

    Superb0bo Well-Known Member

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    anyone read Gospel of Loki by Joanne Harrison? Curious about it...
     
  12. nicelynice

    nicelynice Well-Known Member

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    Name of the Wind is the worst author self-insert male fantasy I've read in quite awhile. I had to put it down a bit after he got into the school. It did, however, made me realize how good the Harry Potter series was, with an interesting world and a likable cast of characters instead of one insufferable perfect character and a supporting cast of... no one.

    I wish I could find more good fantasy, I like the genre. Lies of Locke Lamora was quite fun and had great pacing and I loved the first three Game of Thrones books. I'm also a huge fan of China Mievelle's Bas Lag series if you call that fantasy. I read Joe Abercrombie's trilogy and enjoyed it for what it is but don't really have any desire to go into his other work. I would have enjoyed Sanderson more in highschool but his work steers too far into young adult territory for my taste. As I get older, I find it harder to put up with the things that bother me about genre fiction...

    I've been on a streak of reading non-fiction as well, catching up with some recent "it" books. Behind the Beautiful Forevers, Why Does the World Exist?, the new Michael Lewis (Flash Boys) were all fantastic.
     
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  13. GraphicNovelty

    GraphicNovelty Well-Known Member

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    NN you and I have the same taste pretty much and I agree except I'm enjoying Name of the Wind knowing how cheesy it is because at least fun and well-paced instead of like, excessively grim. Also, it's paradoxically unique in its excessive self-love.

    I've heard good thing about The Throne of the Crescent Moon. Also I'm planning on reading the Earthsea novels next.
     
  14. eluther

    eluther Well-Known Member

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    If you like genre fiction but get tired of its dimensionality, Burroughs' Cities of the Red Night trilogy is amazing. Its an homage to genre fiction itself – westerns, space opera, adventure – but written in the same schizo tone as Naked Lunch. I guess you'd have to like Burroughs to enjoy it, but it's a really unique literary experience
     
  15. t3hg0suazn

    t3hg0suazn Well-Known Member

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    I thought the magic system in Name of the Wind made more sense, or at least had a more logical and scientific flare to it, than Harry Potter. Main character is kind of OP in Name of the Wind, but I just kind of accepted that and was amused at all the ways he dominated. I thought it was a nice contrast because my main gripe with HP in retrospective was that Harry was kind of just a huge bro who was really lucky most of the time. Always liked Hermione more - Emma Watson helped.
     
  16. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Well-Known Member

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    This is all fair. I still stand by "it's more mature than Ayn Rand" comment.

    Fantasy (for me) is always incredibly self indulgent. I think that's one of the things that defines the genre is how repetitious and immature it is, but (when done right) that becomes quite enjoyable and interesting. Kind of like coming of age teen movies. It's also like fairy floss, I can't have too much or I just get annoyed.

    ...but at the same time, it speaks to that part of my mind that's always wishing I had epic powers or something equally embarassing and cool. Can't over indulge, but it'd be silly to deny it.

    I read Mr. Norrell and Jonathon Strange (or is it the other way around) which was, to me, very well pulled off fantasy - it wasn't authorial ego driven (well, didn't seem to me), both the main characters are pretty gross people in their own way, and the set up is fairly curious.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2014
  17. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Well-Known Member

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    Throne of the Crescent Moon is fucking gorgeous. It's kind of like Old Man and the Sea meets Arabia meets fantasy.

    It;s still fairly absurd and if you're not a reader who can stomach to over-damatic nature of the genre it'll not be for you, but I really, really enjoyed it and want the rest out so I can devour them with a hunger that's insatiable.

    Started Jame Frey's A million Tiny Pieces today and it is pretty interesting and Brad Easton Ellis like! I imagine Space Pope would enjoy.
     
  18. wogbog

    wogbog Well-Known Member

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    Finished Infinite Jest and starting Malloy because Beckett Beckett Beckett.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2014
  19. GraphicNovelty

    GraphicNovelty Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Jul 2, 2014
  20. rjbman

    rjbman Well-Known Member

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    So my work just started a reading competition where whoever reads the most (self-proclaimed) pages this month wins an Amazon gift card.

    I don't think they realize the monster they've unleashed...
     

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