Random health and exercise thoughts

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by Eason, Dec 20, 2009.

Tags:
  1. milosz

    milosz Senior member

    Messages:
    4,083
    Likes Received:
    6
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Low cable rows seemed to ease a lot of my shoulder pain.
     


  2. JesseJB

    JesseJB Senior member

    Messages:
    1,353
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2006
    Location:
    Seattle
    Tis the season for lots of festivals, parties and other reasons to drink. I keep my boozin' in check, but see photos uploaded on Facebook nearly every day from one of these gatherings. I'm amazed how OLD a lot of people I graduated from high school with look. I'm "only" 25, too.

    Bloated faces, physiques of a inactive guy in his mid-50s, etc. I'd probably be considered the buzzkill, but I can't believe people can see these photos and not think, "Oh shit, maybe it's time to ease up on the Natty Light."


    As blaringly obvious and prevalant as this is, I'm suprised it doesn't get talked about very much on here.
     


  3. Rikkar501

    Rikkar501 Senior member

    Messages:
    488
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    I have a couple of thngs you could try:

    Look up Dave Tate's bench press instruction videos on Youtube. I think his way of doing the lift is easier on the shoulder than the method taugh by, say, Mark Rippetoe.

    Start overhead pressing at least as much as you are benching. Maybe overhead press at a 2:1 ratio to bench until your shoulder issue clears up.


    Doing this has cleared up some shoulder issue for me in the past, which I think were BP related.


    +1, Dave Tate is a big believer in bench pressing correctly to stay healthy. A powerlifting bench press is going to have alot more elbow tuck compared to what most people do (flared elbows), and this greatly reduces rotator cuff strain.
     


  4. Lagrangian

    Lagrangian Senior member

    Messages:
    3,153
    Likes Received:
    530
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Location:
    interior optimum
    I have a couple of thngs you could try:

    Look up Dave Tate's bench press instruction videos on Youtube. I think his way of doing the lift is easier on the shoulder than the method taugh by, say, Mark Rippetoe.

    Start overhead pressing at least as much as you are benching. Maybe overhead press at a 2:1 ratio to bench until your shoulder issue clears up.


    Doing this has cleared up some shoulder issue for me in the past, which I think were BP related.


    Low cable rows seemed to ease a lot of my shoulder pain.

    +1, Dave Tate is a big believer in bench pressing correctly to stay healthy. A powerlifting bench press is going to have alot more elbow tuck compared to what most people do (flared elbows), and this greatly reduces rotator cuff strain.

    Thanks guys, the thing is I actually watched Tate's benching vid some time ago and tried to incorporate all of what he said into my technique.
    I'll concentrate on strict form military presses, drop the bb bench for a while and give my shoulder some rest (have to eyeball my lifting technique over for those minute details that may be off as well).

    Maybe its just overexhaustion and I'm overthinking it, hope it'll clear up soon though.
     


  5. sonick

    sonick Senior member

    Messages:
    6,032
    Likes Received:
    483
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2003
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Did the Dave Tate method at the gym today with the arched back, tight lats and tucked in elbows... Trainer saw and I asked him about it, said it was bullshit....

    Though I did definitely feel more strength, less shoulder strain, fuller range of motion and targeted the pecs much better.
     


  6. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

    Messages:
    9,462
    Likes Received:
    3,719
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    Did the Dave Tate method at the gym today with the arched back, tight lats and tucked in elbows... Trainer saw and I asked him about it, said it was bullshit....

    Though I did definitely feel more strength, less shoulder strain, fuller range of motion and targeted the pecs much better.


    trainer probably doesn't know what he's talking about. Did he tell you not to arch your back?


    the dave tate and other powerlifting methods give you more strength because the give you a tighter platform across the back, and you can actually use your lats to add a bit more strength (apparently). I don't think it targets pecs any better than normal bench press, but it should reduce strain on the shoulders.
     


  7. sonick

    sonick Senior member

    Messages:
    6,032
    Likes Received:
    483
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2003
    Location:
    Vancouver
    trainer probably doesn't know what he's talking about. Did he tell you not to arch your back?


    the dave tate and other powerlifting methods give you more strength because the give you a tighter platform across the back, and you can actually use your lats to add a bit more strength (apparently). I don't think it targets pecs any better than normal bench press, but it should reduce strain on the shoulders.


    Well I felt it helped isolate the pecs better. Perhaps it was more the stable platform and the wrist/elbow alignment that made it feel that way.

    I was also showing my friend how to do a JM Press but the trainer thought I was showing close-grip bench press and started trying to correct the form.
     


  8. slzhao

    slzhao Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Location:
    Memphis, TN


  9. Rikkar501

    Rikkar501 Senior member

    Messages:
    488
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Did the Dave Tate method at the gym today with the arched back, tight lats and tucked in elbows... Trainer saw and I asked him about it, said it was bullshit....

    Though I did definitely feel more strength, less shoulder strain, fuller range of motion and targeted the pecs much better.


    [​IMG] The very fact that you felt the benefits of benching powerlifting style should tell you all you need to know.....most gym "trainers" couldn't even tell you who Dave Tate is.
     


  10. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

    Messages:
    9,462
    Likes Received:
    3,719
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    the thing is, as the argument for high bar over low bar squats in terms of functional strength has some proponents, you could argue the same thing against powerlifting style bench press.


    if you're training to increase strength rather than just to push as much weight as you possibly can, there might be reason to avoid the full on powerlifting type bench.
     


  11. Rikkar501

    Rikkar501 Senior member

    Messages:
    488
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    the thing is, as the argument for high bar over low bar squats in terms of functional strength has some proponents, you could argue the same thing against powerlifting style bench press.


    if you're training to increase strength rather than just to push as much weight as you possibly can, there might be reason to avoid the full on powerlifting type bench.


    Do you mean training to increase hypertrophy? Because training to push as much weight as possible is training to increase strength! Sure, the powerlifting style is more suited to building up your benchpress, not necessarily to increase the size of your chest.

    It all depends on your goals both long and short term. If all you're after is hypertrophy than you could bench conventional or even scrap it all together in favor of DB's since you are after specific targeting of the pecs. But if you plan on benching for the next 30 years ( I certainly do!) it might be wise to stick with the PL style since it has fewer joint and muscle tear risks than conventional.
     


  12. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

    Messages:
    9,462
    Likes Received:
    3,719
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    Do you mean training to increase hypertrophy? Because training to push as much weight as possible is training to increase strength! Sure, the powerlifting style is more suited to building up your benchpress, not necessarily to increase the size of your chest.

    nah i mean the powerlifting bench you can push as much weight on a bench as possible but that doesn't mean your functional strength i.e. the strength of a more realistic push in real life is stronger. in any actual push one would do in a situation, you would use your shoulders much more than a powerlifting bench uses it, and lats would never be involved (not to mention the very short range of motion of a powerlifting bench)

    actually, most of the sports trainers guys say that overhead press gives greater transferrability to strength.

    I guess it doesn't matter so long as you're still doing overhead presses and lots of shoulder work.
     


  13. ConcernedParent

    ConcernedParent Senior member

    Messages:
    4,234
    Likes Received:
    30
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Location:
    West Coast is back for all you suckas
    Any other tricep exercises I should do?

    There's always this weird pulling feeling in my tri's when I do extensions and some funky shit goes on with my shoulders when I do skullcrushers with too much weight.
     


  14. GraphicNovelty

    GraphicNovelty Senior member

    Messages:
    5,487
    Likes Received:
    2,860
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Location:
    NYC
    ^Weighted dips?
     


  15. sonick

    sonick Senior member

    Messages:
    6,032
    Likes Received:
    483
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2003
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Any other tricep exercises I should do?

    There's always this weird pulling feeling in my tri's when I do extensions and some funky shit goes on with my shoulders when I do skullcrushers with too much weight.


    Look up the JM Press
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by