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Random health and exercise thoughts

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by Eason, Dec 20, 2009.

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  1. Lagrangian

    Lagrangian Senior member

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    thank god I've never owned a smartphone. or any electronic device with a touchscreen, come to think of it. i have all these nice things at work but they're so fucking useless.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2014
  2. Lagrangian

    Lagrangian Senior member

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  3. fuji

    fuji Senior member

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    Dat feel when lifts are considered huge, :embar:


    Since he obviously means charly maybe this means in 2 years ill be at charly level.
     
  4. ridethecliche

    ridethecliche Senior member

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    You don't have to do everything 110% to make progress.

    Periodization like conceptualist is describing has existed in endurance training forever. You build a base and then sharpen the knife. You can progress on everything together, if you stall out hard, then target it more if you want to, but you're not going to be a one lift specialist, so why train like one?
     
  5. fuji

    fuji Senior member

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    Forever doing shit loads of doubles on squats and then occasionally a single because I don't have the mental grit to squat more then 2 reps.
     
  6. mrchariybrown

    mrchariybrown Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    Sup.




    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
     
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  7. ridethecliche

    ridethecliche Senior member

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  8. Coldsnap

    Coldsnap Senior member

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    Ah yes, solid information. Since I decided to only compete once a year in November because it's easier on the body that way and a good milestone to determine progress, I can look at my programming from a 12 month perspective instead of 4 week mini cycles. I then start looking at stuff put out by NSCA on athletes during off season, so that would be January to mid September for me. It made lots of sense to focus for those months on gaining muscle while staying lean and working on conditioning, all while staying un injured. Instead of trying to server hypertrophy, strength, and conditioning year round. Then as I get closer to my meet I start practicing with heavier weights and using the extra muscle gained and extra ability to recover (conditioning) to my benefit. That just seemed like a much smarter decision than eating cheeseburgers and doing 5/3/1 year round. Although I'm scared that all this work with light weight is going to make me weak, but I'll know for sure when my meet comes. I can already tell the difference in my physique and conditioning after 2 months.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2014
  9. ridethecliche

    ridethecliche Senior member

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    Since there's no such thing as 'unfunctional' muscle, if you gain mass, then retrain to lift heavy instead of lifting for reps your body will come around. The last bit is the neuromuscular bit, i.e. training muscle patterns and such to get a stronger contraction and recruit more fibers to fire as you train heavier.

    Atleast that's what I think periodization tries to accomplish, essentially limiting potential for injuries by working much closer to your max for longer durations. Also the additional benefit of not hitting burnout by keeping things fresh. Also not really giving your body a chance to fully adapt to the stress.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2014
  10. OccultaVexillum

    OccultaVexillum Senior member

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    I might be misreading you, but are you basically saying that lifting heavy isn't as conducive to gaining mass as higher rep hypertrophy stuff?
     
  11. ridethecliche

    ridethecliche Senior member

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    Was speaking more from the injury/fatigue point of view, but kinda.

    I stand corrected though: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12436270
     
  12. conceptionist

    conceptionist Senior member

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    Yeah, that's a good plan. Maybe you just want to do a smaller paking phase somewhere in the middle to judge where you're at. I know Mike Tuchscherer has had his clients do 4 weeks of volume and 3 weeks of intensity and then 1 week with mock meet, regardless how far it is until meet day. The thought behind it is that you need to practice doing meets as well, to get as specific as possible with your training. Its easy to underestimate what its like to do 9 max effort lifts in a day. A more frequent 1RM testing also lets you set new 1RMs to calculate your percentages off for all the lifts in the training cycle (if you use percentages).

    I don't think you need to worry. In the 7 weeks up to my meet, the heaviest I went was singles and doubles in 80-85% (no higher rep ranges there), and most of the work in 60-80% with 3-8 reps. I still got a 10 pounds PR for the squat.

    The same intensities were used for bench, but with higher volume overall. Not as many high rep sets but a lot more sets of lower reps. Got a 20 pound bench PR.

    Deadlifts didn't go as well as the other two lifts. The heaviest I went was 85%, so the intensity was the same for the deadlift as the other lifts. However, it seems like I'm the most "weight sensitive" with the deadlift. The shock of pulling 60 pounds heavier than I had for almost two months was too big.

    And for the 315 squat PR I got back in march, before starting that training cycle towards the meet, I didn't do a single squat past 250 lbs in one month.
     
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  13. Coldsnap

    Coldsnap Senior member

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    Yea, that makes sense to me.


    Absolutely, it's been proven with science and bro-science time and time again. There's tons of variables that need to be addressed first, but if done right higher rep with lighter weight will lead to more hypertrophy. You still need to lift heavy though, I'm talking like 225+ lbs for few sets of 15, 12, 10, 15 etc.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2014
  14. OccultaVexillum

    OccultaVexillum Senior member

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    Cool, I was just checking I understood right before I said anything. I mean there's a ton of literature saying that tut is the primary driver of hypertrophy (like higher rep sets), but there's an equal amount saying that it's cumulative stress (like clusters, 10x3, and multiple weekly sessions hitting the same movements).
    It can go either way really.
     
  15. Coldsnap

    Coldsnap Senior member

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    I have no clue about TUT, I've seen it been disputed a lot. I have slowed down all my reps though to make them what people would consider tutting, because I noticed powerlifting taught me to maximize my leveradges and catch a big bounce on everything. If I slowed it down a lot it forced the muscles to contract and pump more at those end ranges of motion, instead of the joints powering through it. Don't know if that makes sense of if it's just broscience.
     
  16. barrelntrigger

    barrelntrigger Senior member

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    FUCKING A!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Lol, bro-science! I was talking to one of my co-work who body builds. He told me part of his program is doing high reps (30) to really break down the muscle fibers for hypertrophy.
     
  17. conceptionist

    conceptionist Senior member

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    I don't know if its that black and white.

    Overall volume is also very important and doing higher rep sets gets you to that needed volume faster than doing low rep sets. So in theory, maybe the hypertrophy could be the same for 3 sets of 10 as 10 sets of 3, with proper percentages used for both alternatives. Its just that 3 sets of 10 can be done in 10 minutes while 10 sets of 3 would take me 30 minutes.

    There's the argument that higher rep sets lead to more lactic acid build up (which is good for hypertrophy) and that longer sets have higher time under tension. The latter has been debunked by Eric Helms of 3DMJ. I don't know much about the science of the lactic acid build up though. Long time under tension with the main lifts has other benefits, both those are more linked to technique and positioning.

    Also, I'm not sure you need to go as high as 10-15 reps. Mike Tuchscherer doesn't seem to prescribe over 5-8 reps in his volume phases and my program hasn't gone over 8 reps with the powerlifts. I could be wrong, but I think 10-15 reps is too far removed from doing a single and that you could be better off by just doing more sets of 5-8 in this case.
     
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  18. OccultaVexillum

    OccultaVexillum Senior member

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    TUT doesn't just reference "slow reps" though. If doing 5 reps takes you 12 seconds to complete, and 10 reps takes 25 seconds at the same cadence, then that's a longer tut. There's a lot of studies that say tut of ~40 seconds is ideal for hypertrophy, and whether that is achieved by doing 5 super slow reps or by doing 15 standard reps doesn't really enter the conversation (although it seems like standard reps would work better). That's also one of the reasons I like clusters so much - high density of heavy work in a short period of time. It still carries some of the TUT school of thought even though you are taking a 20-60 second break between reps/sets. A cluster set could last 20 minutes and give you a ridiculous pump even if it's only doing 1-3 reps per "set".
    Either way, nowadays I just train the way I like to train which is usually a combination of everything. 1st movement usually heavy, 2nd movement usually something that feeds off the first but that I can use a constant tension type technique, 3rd movement is usually something I can get a good pump on etc. I will say in general I train at 4-10 reps, occasionally hitting triples and only doing 1-2 reps in clusters. Anything over 10 is usually legs, traps or shoulders.
     
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  19. ridethecliche

    ridethecliche Senior member

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    Yeah, the one study I cited could very well be disproved really easily.

    It was also on untrained lifters, so I don't know if we can make any comparisons to people that have been lifting for even a year.

    I honestly do believe that smaller rep schemes are better at recruiting more fibers for contractions and higher rep schemes are better for muscle. By higher, I mean 8-12 vs like 1-5 reps.

    For periodization though, I think the most important thing is mixing it up in a systematic way to keep challenging your body.

    The reason this is hard to measure is:
    -Both things lead to hypertrophy
    -Genetics play a role
    -This is really fucking hard to study! People don't like having muscle biopsies taken!

    In most of the bodybuilder vs powerlifter things I've seen, powerlifters can outlift bb'ers at the same weight class, but bb'ers have higher work capacity. Isn't that the case?
     
  20. ridethecliche

    ridethecliche Senior member

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    Re: Tut etc, is that referring to slow negatives?
     

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