Random health and exercise thoughts

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by Eason, Dec 20, 2009.

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  1. Coldsnap

    Coldsnap Senior member

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    Yep, you're right. I pissed negative. I probably won't be positive on this diet.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2012


  2. joshuadowen

    joshuadowen Senior member

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    From my understanding of how you are eating, nothing will change in a few weeks. Ketones won't show up until your body has been depleted of glucose intake for a while. That's not a 12 or 18 hour process. Anyone who has tried either long-term fasting or carb-free eating can tell you that it feels like shit for 2-3 days as your glucose levels deplete and before your body adjusts. Eating large, carb-rich meals as regularly as you are will in no way deprive your body of glucose intake on any significant level.
     


  3. Coldsnap

    Coldsnap Senior member

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    True. So I eat carb heavy meals after 5 pm on Monday, Wednesday, Friday (and probably Sunday). I gotta say though I have been feeling really "different" since watching my carbs. On my low carb days I have a very washed out feeling, like haziness and irritability. Also my eyes hurt... but that might just be my sinuses / me getting use to the dry climate up here compared to Florida.
     


  4. knucks

    knucks Senior member

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    it takes time for the body to get used to those low carb days...if im busy i barely notice it now
     


  5. joshuadowen

    joshuadowen Senior member

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    Yeah. Here is my major worry with this diet - you are restricting carbs just enough to feel like shit, but not enough to ever see the other side of it. On the low carb days you feel like shit because your blood sugar gets low. You then have your big carb heavy meal, which puts glucose back in your muscles and liver to the extent there was depletion, but also provokes a large insulin response. The insulin pulls sugar out of your blood, leaving your blood sugar low for 36-48 hours until your next big carb meal, during which time you feel shitty. You are creating a yo-yo that gives you the worst of both low-carb eating and hi-carb eating.

    My memory is that this is all in trying to cut body fat. People here may disagree with me but at the point you are putting your body through this, you'd be better off just cutting carbs completely. Eat lean protein and leafy veggies. You will feel shitty for 2-3 days, but your body will adjust by burning stored fat for energy. After your body adjusts you'll feel fine, especially since you don't do a lot of high intensity anaerobic training.
     


  6. knucks

    knucks Senior member

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    josh, cut carbs completely? whattt?
     


  7. Coldsnap

    Coldsnap Senior member

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    Point taken but I need dat growth from the carbs. I want to lean about but I still want to be built like a powerlifter. I think Knucks is right sayin I will get used to it. I've already gotten use to training with zero carbs in me. You should give the book a read Josh, you seem well read (at least more than me) on the subject and could broaden your knowledge.
     


  8. joshuadowen

    joshuadowen Senior member

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    I'll take a look. I think other people have mentioned on here already, but trying to gain strength but cut fat at the same time always creates some conflicting nutritional requirements. I hear what you are saying and am not sure there's any ideal solution. I will say though, eating cleaner carbs for your post-workout meals might help mitigate some of the feeling gross on low carbs days.
     


  9. knucks

    knucks Senior member

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    I dont think it will make him feel any less "gross"

    I don't feel gross on low-carb days...my only theory on it all is if I eat more quality food post workout I recover better, but who knows, might be bro-science.
     


  10. joshuadowen

    joshuadowen Senior member

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    You don't feel it, he has said that he does. But I agree with you that higher quality food leads to better recovery.
     


  11. fuji

    fuji Senior member

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    For the last 2 days I've been lying on my sofa phlegming everywhere and watching lord of the rings whilst eating german waffle cookies. No fucks given about getting swoler when im this ill.
     


  12. APK

    APK Senior member

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    There's this girl at my gym who's all into the Crossfit nonsense, but I've also seen her doing deep squats at what looks like close to 200 pounds and deadlifts with great form.
     


  13. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    yeah not really......


    the insulin doesnt pull all the sugar out of your blood :facepalm: (and in fact after any carb heavy meal you're going to have a spike then constantly elevated levels in blood sugar) and your body burns stored fat for energy when you're at a caloric deficit whether or not you're on a low carb diet...
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2012


  14. joshuadowen

    joshuadowen Senior member

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    Sorry, you are wrong.

    1. Insulin does pull sugar out of the blood. That is one of it's roles in the body. Insulin signals your body to remove glucose from the blood and store it, either in muscles or the liver. Without insulin to lower your blood sugar, you end up in a diabetic coma. This is why diabetics must inject insulin after meals. Yes meals cause a spike in blood sugar, which then causes a large insulin response. The insulin response typically lowers blood sugar beyond pre-meal levels. This is what caused the "sugar crash" feeling about 2-3 hours after a hi-carb meal.

    2. Your body preferentially burns glucose over fat. There are a number of theories for why this is true, the most compelling of which is that your body has a very low capacity for glucose storage and a very high capacity for fat storage. As long as there is excess glucose your body will preferentially use this for energy rather than converting it to stored fat. It is true that in order to burn stored fat for energy you must be running a deficit with respect to energy in/energy out. If you are running a large deficit, your body will have to burn stored fat, but will always go after the free glucose first.
     


  15. joshuadowen

    joshuadowen Senior member

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    I looked at the article you sent me on the carb-backloading. It's definitely interesting, and I have to say I learned something new. The basic premise seems to be that immediately after resistance training, your muscles will absorb blood glucose without an insulin spike, thereby allowing muscle growth but avoiding decreased insulin sensitivity over time. This supports other research telling us to eat carbs immediately after exercise.

    I guess the issue I've got is this - on a medium-to-large athletic male, only a few hundred grams of glucose are stored in muscle mass. Exercise causes some depletion of this storage, but a typical weight-lifting session will not dramatically lower the glucose already being stored. Having looked at the pictures you posted, you seem to be eating hundreds and hundreds of grams of carbs post-workout. Some of this will be stored in the muscles, some will fuel muscle growth, and some will be burned for energy immediately, but not enough to require an entire pizza, a handful of cookies, etc. I think carb-backloading science is sound, but shouldn't be interpreted to give you free reign to eat as much sugary food as you can get down after every workout. Even after a workout, there's a limit to how much glucose your muscles can absorb and how much glucose your body needs to burn for energy immediately. Any excess dietary glucose will always be converted to fat. I suppose that on the following low-carb day, your body will burn some of these newly-made fat cells for energy, but it seems more efficient to just not overeat in the first place.
     


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