Random food thoughts - Street edition

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by i01111000, May 12, 2013.

  1. momentoftruth

    momentoftruth Senior member

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    agreed, although that would be true pretty much in any Western country (it's not like highways in Europe have great restaurants either). The difference here in TX might be that the highway is completely integrated in the city's inner landscape.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2013
  2. dotcomzzz

    dotcomzzz Senior member

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    Mashed w gravy > red beans and rice.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2013
  3. Earnest Hemingway

    Earnest Hemingway Senior member

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    Apparently there is a Popeye's in Kenmore, will be checking it out this weekend.

    Back to fashion talk plz?
     
  4. RFX45

    RFX45 Senior member

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    Popeyes 2 piece .99 cent Tuesdays/Thursdays > all
     
  5. Fuuma

    Fuuma Franchouillard Modasse

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    Well the difference is that Europe developed on a grid where distance from marketplace to marketplace had to be done by cart (so lots of small to mid-sized settlements all over the territory and almost no empty/long stretches of highway without at least a village right by) while North America was built and really developed on a scale suitable for car culture (so lots of highways and empty space). In Europe you don't have to eat on the highway....

    I've eaten good or at least interesting food almost everywhere I've been and the USA is no exception. Sure the mainstream of America used to have access to shitty food for its development level but at least I didn't have to hear about foodism and that kind of shit, I can't stand food fandom culture and, yeah, maybe the lack of an important and alive tradition of eating well means when food came back big time it became this exceptional thing people talk about constantly, which is fucking annoying. Italians just have good food, everywhere, almost always. It's expected not something you annoy people with. They don't need plenty of 3 stars restaurants or whatever but they just eat better than anyone else anyway (maybe hyperbole but in Italy, good products matters in many parts of life and this stands outside of a productivist mindset).

    http://fstoppers.com/what-a-week-of-groceries-looks-like-around-the-world

    What would be interesting is to hear people in their 30s and 40s who post here talk about how people who liked eating well (especially in"ethnic" restaurants) were going about it in the 80s and 90s, I'm thinking of guys like LAGuy who I'm guessing was big into that if he lived in LA.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2013
  6. Teger

    Teger Senior member

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    ugh have to buy my stupid plane tickets to houston soon.

    also never eaten at popeye's. but i doubt it's better than lee's

    [​IMG]
     
  7. NaTionS

    NaTionS Senior member

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    Popeyes is the new sf hype.
     
  8. reedobandito

    reedobandito Senior member

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    Portland food scene has gotta be at least top 5 in the nation, there are literally too many fucking great places, it's impossible to try them all. I've given it a hell of a shot tho
     
  9. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    I lived in the LA in the late 90s, and I lived a weekend trip away from Toronto before that.

    The thing about both of those cities that makes the food so great, perhaps ironically, is that they are "not" dense in the same way NYC is. I once drove with a friend from Long Beach to Tarzana (don't ask why) and it took a full 2 hours. So, you keep on finding new shit that would never happen in NYC. Little hole in the strip mall places that could not survive in NYC if they are not selling some trendy shit, and yes, I am looking at you, Banh Mi. I mean, I had a good friend from the Szechuan region who took me to a very non-descript restaurant beside an adult bookstore and a laundromat that served real, and really good, and spine-seizure inducing, spicy, Szechuan food. That place was mostly frequented by szechuan people, with the occasional Cantonese friend and gwai lo. In NYC, this place would have been talked about until it died because of hipsters looking for an authentic experience or something.

    Toronto is the same. The best Chinese food (and when I talk about Chinese food, I really mean Cantonese food, which is what most people know anyway) is not in Chinatown. Chinatown is sorta the ghetto. The better restaurants are all in North Toronto, all over the strip malls, and they all sport the "red and gold" look for proper restaurants, or "all bathroom tile, all the time" look, for noodle shops (incidentally, those are usually not considered proper dinner.) Lunch, yes, snack, yes. However, a proper dinner requires rice.

    None of the Chinese people I know who really life food give a shit about Michelin stars. I have a few friends and an uncle who do know that stuff, but mainly because they have or had positions in which they had to entertain white people. In fact, a lot of the criteria for obtaining a Michelin star would not make any sense in these food cultures. Personally, although I've been to a fair number of three star ones, I actually prefer the single star, bistro style places, because I know that one of the reasons they couldn't get a second star was because the restaurant is too casual.

    Anyway, back to Fuuma's question. I would go to restaurants (Chinese and Italian) which were recommended to me, usually by family friends, since twenty year olds rarely have the experience that a 40 year old does. You simply have not eaten as much. Probably, most of these places, I would never have found on my own. These days, I still take personal recommendations from people whose taste I trust. I don't trust Yelp, which is full of people who think that Appleby's is fucking great, or Chowhound, which is full of the food equivalent of dudes with handlebar mustaches and bartender's braces.

    BTW, when I have a moment, I am going to take all the food posts from the next couple of days and make a new thread - "streetwear food talk". If you have a better name, you'd better tell me.
     
  10. cyc wid it

    cyc wid it Senior member

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    Taiwanese food is superior.
     
  11. Fuuma

    Fuuma Franchouillard Modasse

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    Name is fine by me.

    The remark about "high end" restaurants being useful to entertain white people is quite true, I've often been on the receiving end of that stereotype in various cultures, as they bring me to the nice spot in town with the good decor and service instead of the hole in the wall with plastic chairs which is actually what the locals like. Second or third dining experience is thus usually my favourite since we discover those. I'm not much into high end dining and especially not into modernist cuisine, I like hearthy traditional food even when it comes to French (I prefer chez Georges to Robuchon for example) or Italian cuisine, which is why I don't look down on those American joints with the pie and everything or UK pub fare.I prefer the SE Asian approach to dining TBH. It's funny how they like to go to their restaurants even when in other countries, the only outstanding Udon place in Paris is always full of Japanese tourists, which always makes me chuckle.

    Toronto: the best eel I ever had was in some strip mall in Northern Toronto, don't remember where and the place is probably gone but it was quite the surprise. I guess you're right that urbanism plays an important role in your experience of a city food and in letting obscure but excellent joints remain obscure, this place would have been flooded in NYC, although last time I was there I had excellent Cantonese basics at some place that wasn't that full but is a fav of a Chinese friend who happens to have moved to TO, where he finds the Chinese to be amongst the best in America, behind Vancouver and maybe SanFran).

    Topics for the future SWD food talk:
    1) Eastcoast America and it's Jewish dinner superiority, who would get a bagel anywhere else?
    2) Good Indian cuisine is so hard to find in the western world because the long time to cook food make it illegal for Indian restaurants to do it properly.
    3) High end burgers with caviar or whatever and when this bullshit is gonna end.
    4) Ethiopian food and when it will blow up, so good and made to be eaten in groups
    5) Kids these days and why they don't fucking eat liver, brain and all the other good parts because their boomer parents were boring assholes when it comes to food. My old man eats amourettes (bull testicles) so I was lucky, I eat rabbit brains and chicken hearts with relish.
     
  12. Teger

    Teger Senior member

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    Even though Richmond is only two hours south of Northern Virginia, where I moved here from, the food culture is entirely different (in a good way). Much less emphasis on looking cool or being on trend, with an authenticity rooted in farm to table (kill me) that you find lacking in even the trendiest, most organic NoVa restaurants. Everything being half the cost is a nice bonus.
     
  13. shoreman1782

    shoreman1782 Senior member

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    The offal movement has gotten out of control though. I'm happy to eat some sweetbreads or sample the local treatment of intestines, but the macho braggy aspect of "I ate four courses of animal parts that we all agreed taste like literal poop 50 years ago" has gotten to be a little much
     
  14. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

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    do you guys have chaat restaurants in USA?
     
  15. Fuuma

    Fuuma Franchouillard Modasse

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    I'm not in the USA very often but I've never seen any there, maybe in LA or a place like that. It's more of an Asia type of thing for me, I usually go to places like that if they also serve iced milk coffee or something like that.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2013

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