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Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. ektaylor

    ektaylor Senior member

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    Does anyone know how to find a quality meat (particularly pork) supplier on the Central Coast of California? I'm spending a couple months in San Luis Obispo come June and, as far as I can tell, the area lacks a decent butcher. Most larger suppliers in the Bay Area require a massive minimum order to access their product. I'm wondering if there is a middle man who will sell primal cuts on an individual basis?
     
  2. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I've never made brioche either, but I can make a decent puff dough. I don't think it's really very hard. The most important parts are obviously the distribution of the butter and then the quality of the physical lamination, neither of which are hard if you know what you're doing.
    Maybe the pastry people have a hard time with the brioche b/c it's a 90% butter brioche. So it's probably harder to work with than a regular recipe.

    I just made 36 baby brioche for a party tonight. Seemed pretty easy to me. Texture and taste are great.
     
  3. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    I have 2 marrow bones. How to prep for eat?
     
  4. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    I am making oat bread cockaigne from JOC and the recipe calls for soy flour along with the wheat and all purpose flours. What is the point of the soy flour, and how can i replace it?
     
  5. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    A few ways. Either soak for a little bit in warm water, then push out the marrow and soak it in cold overnight and poach, or just crack the bone and roast the marrow in it. You can also use it for all sorts of preparations... bordelaise sauce etc.
     
  6. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    or just crack the bone and roast the marrow in it.

    I'm going to try this, I have two small pieces (maybe 3" by 3") to cook. It's more because I'm interested in trying it out than making a grand creation. I'll give it 20 mins. at 350 and spread on bread.
     
  7. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    I'm going to try this, I have two small pieces (maybe 3" by 3") to cook. It's more because I'm interested in trying it out than making a grand creation. I'll give it 20 mins. at 350 and spread on bread.
    the fergus henderson technique is wrap both ends of the bones in aluminum foil and roast at 450 for about 15 minutes. works great for me. he serves it with a parsley salad ... something a bit bitter to cut the richness.
     
  8. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    soy flour? sounds like 60s health food which means that it must be coming from the '72 edition. they got a little wacky. i don't even remember seeing soy flour in a story for ages. i think king arthur makes one, though.
     
  9. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    the fergus henderson technique is wrap both ends of the bones in aluminum foil and roast at 450 for about 15 minutes. works great for me. he serves it with a parsley salad ... something a bit bitter to cut the richness.

    Wonderful. Will do, and will serve with the fresh parsley I picked up.
     
  10. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Do you soak the marrow bones in water, or water and something else, to make them ready for eating prior to cooking? I love marrow on toast.
     
  11. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Do you soak the marrow bones in water, or water and something else, to make them ready for eating prior to cooking? I love marrow on toast.
    Cold water with perhaps a dash of salt. You are just trying to draw out the blood, which can be bitter, and looks crappy. Change the water every few hours.
     
  12. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Cold water with perhaps a dash of salt. You are just trying to draw out the blood, which can be bitter, and looks crappy. Change the water every few hours.

    Thanks. Will try in the next few weeks. Wine pairing? Something white, dry and acidic?
     
  13. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    Cold water with perhaps a dash of salt. You are just trying to draw out the blood, which can be bitter, and looks crappy. Change the water every few hours.
    fwiw, that's not part of the henderson recipe ... and i've never had a problem with it. it might be a more necessary step if you're planning on removing the marrow intact and serving it as a garnish, ala bordelaise.
    for wines, you can go two ways: rich on rich and serve a sweetie, or i really like marrow with pinot, particularly one with a little age.
     
  14. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Hmm, night have to try with an ice wine then.
     
  15. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    soy flour? sounds like 60s health food which means that it must be coming from the '72 edition. they got a little wacky. i don't even remember seeing soy flour in a story for ages. i think king arthur makes one, though.

    It is the newest 75th anniversary edition. Can I just omit it and replace it with all purpose flour?
     
  16. why

    why Senior member

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    It is the newest 75th anniversary edition. Can I just omit it and replace it with all purpose flour?
    The soy flour is probably added for its extra protein. The closest match for soy flour is probably bread flour. Bread flour likely still has less protein than soy flour, but it shouldn't be a big deal.
     
  17. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    Chawanmushi. Any tips/comments regarding technique?
     
  18. Alter

    Alter Senior member

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    Chawanmushi. Any tips/comments regarding technique?

    Bubbles are your enemy! When you are heating up your dashi, don't let it come to a boil. When you add the beaten eggs to the dashi you want to whisk it without any bubbles forming. Likewise, don't over-steam it as that will cause bubbles too.
     
  19. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    Bubbles are your enemy! When you are heating up your dashi, don't let it come to a boil. When you add the beaten eggs to the dashi you want to whisk it without any bubbles forming. Likewise, don't over-steam it as that will cause bubbles too.

    Thanks dude. I'll be doing a veg dashi and a veg mushi. With kombu and dried shiitake instead of bonito. Any advice on what to put in the mushi? (Dad can only eat eggs, but no chicken/shrimp/other typical stuff). Since it's spring, I was thinking fava beans, pea shoots, diced firm tofu, and maybe bamboo. I know ginko nuts are typical, but are they considered essential? I have a way to get them but it would take longer than I want to wait.
     
  20. Alter

    Alter Senior member

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    Thanks dude. I'll be doing a veg dashi and a veg mushi. With kombu and dried shiitake instead of bonito. Any advice on what to put in the mushi? (Dad can only eat eggs, but no chicken/shrimp/other typical stuff). Since it's spring, I was thinking fava beans, pea shoots, diced firm tofu, and maybe bamboo. I know ginko nuts are typical, but are they considered essential? I have a way to get them but it would take longer than I want to wait.

    I would put a bit of the shiitake you use for the dashi...the bamboo sounds good...you can live without the ginko (though that is my favorite part) but you need something with a similar texture...the fava is OK but a couple edamame may be better. Something sounds odd about putting tofu in there. Perhaps the texture is too similar to the chawanmushi itself? I have had some with a tiny piece of some roasted chestnut. But whatever you do, remember that the custard itself is the main attraction...don't load it up too much with other stuff.
     

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