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Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. ektaylor

    ektaylor Senior member

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    Now that I re-read that was clearly the intention. Since the cocoa powder is dry I thought it might throw the wet-dry ratio(if that even means anything).

    I think the intention was to ask why you would want to add chocolate to tea bread. Chocolate is a strong flavor in and off itself and would offset the delicate bitterness of tea.
     
  2. why

    why Senior member

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    I could be wrong, but I think the question was not "why add chocolate," but "why do you think adding cocoa powder means you should reduce flour?" I'm not a baker, though, so maybe that's a-ok. Just seems to me that they have very different functions in the whole process.

    I really don't understand how my statement could be read that way unless I omitted a modal and a crucial comma.
     
  3. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    I really don't understand how my statement could be read that way unless I omitted a modal and a crucial comma.
    "let's eat Grandma" or "Let's eat, Grandma" - commas are important!
     
  4. sonick

    sonick Senior member

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    "let's eat Grandma" or "Let's eat, Grandma" - commas are important!

    better example:

    "Let's eat out, Grandma!" vs "Let's eat out Grandma!"
     
  5. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    better example: "Let's eat out, Grandma!" vs "Let's eat out Grandma!"
    I just threw up in my mouth a little bit.
     
  6. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    I think the intention was to ask why you would want to add chocolate to tea bread. Chocolate is a strong flavor in and off itself and would offset the delicate bitterness of tea.

    I do not eat tea bread exclusively with tea and I think it also depends on what sort of tea you are drinking it with.
     
  7. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    what is a good restaurant supply store in Manhattan?
     
  8. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    what is a good restaurant supply store in Manhattan?
    What do you need? For a lot of items, I like to shop in China Town .. but I would not buy Knives or Good Pots/pans there.
     
  9. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    I don't think it gets any better than JB Prince.
     
  10. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    What do you need? For a lot of items, I like to shop in China Town .. but I would not buy Knives or Good Pots/pans there.

    I need things besides knives and pots/pans. Strainers, slotted spoons, cheesecloth (that isn't $6 for this little pad), twine, parchment paper, etc.



    will check for a JB Prince.
     
  11. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    Yeah.. those are the kinds of things I buy dirt cheap in chinatown
     
  12. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    I'll take a gander down, any particular streets you suggest wandering?
     
  13. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    I'll take a gander down, any particular streets you suggest wandering?
    You'll have to ask a local... I can tell you where to go in chicago c-town. My guess would be to start on canal and head south right in the middle on Mott or Elizabeth
     
  14. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    Why do they cook everything in La Cucina with extra virgin olive oil? They even use it to fry.
     
  15. why

    why Senior member

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    Why do they cook everything in La Cucina with extra virgin olive oil? They even us it to fry.

    That's generally how it's done in Italy.
     
  16. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    That's generally how it's done in Italy.

    I've fried things in EV olive oil, I didn't like it much.
     
  17. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    OK... here's a random food question...

    what's the difference between an "oil poach" and a "fry" or "Sautee"
     
  18. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    Oil poaching means the object is completely submerged in fat and cooked at a lower temp (usually 160-180F)
    Fry can be shallow fried, with the object sticking out of the oil, or deep fried, with the object entirely submerged, but denotes a much higher temperature.
    Sauteeing is a small amount of fat at a relatively high temperature and the food is agitated often.
     
  19. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Senior member

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    Thanks.. I knew the difference between a fry and a sautee... but I was not clear on the oil poach. My understanding of the word poach was that it is roughly synonymous with "boil"... and boiling in oil is deep frying.
     
  20. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Thanks.. I knew the difference between a fry and a sautee... but I was not clear on the oil poach. My understanding of the word poach was that it is roughly synonymous with "boil"... and boiling in oil is deep frying.
    Well, poach just means to cook in hot water. You really shouldn't be boiling meats... ever. Remember, also, that poaching in oil at the same temp as water, say 180, will take longer than in water since oil is less dense and doesn't conduct heat as well.
     

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