1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. otc

    otc Senior member

    Messages:
    14,215
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    

    They are fairly different...

    Both make a more condensed and stronger brew, but the Moka pot makes a more of a thick and almost slightly gritty brew (if it is actually gritty...you are probably using too fine a grind) due to the metal filter. An espresso machine pushes through a paper filter and pulls all of that stuff out. The moka pot also generates far less pressure and probably brews at a higher temperature (since the water basically boils up into the coffee) so the end result is different.

    But for cheap and simple...I like the moka pot. I used mine for years before I switched to the Aeropress.
     
  2. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

    Messages:
    8,831
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    At the corner of hipster and hip replacement
    most of my italian friends have moka pots at home (but then they're used to great espresso at 2,000 lire at every street corner). the most persnickity coffee friends i have swear by aeropress. i've got a rancilio silvia espresso maker that's relatively reasonable and is an absolute workhorse. coffee quality is very, very good. but if you're going down that road, be aware that y ou're also going to need a really good grinder.
     
  3. Bhowie

    Bhowie Senior member

    Messages:
    13,099
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    Location:
    Running the trap house.
    I'm impressed they are able to still pay for things with lire.
     
  4. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

    Messages:
    8,831
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    At the corner of hipster and hip replacement
    
    read carefully. I said "they were used to" ... espresso prices are actually mandated by the government, good cheap coffee is a right like a chicken in ever pot. And that's also why you must be very careful when you sit at a table and order -- table prices are unregulated while the same coffee ordered standing at the bar are.
     
  5. b1os

    b1os Senior member

    Messages:
    9,448
    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Location:
    Berlin/Hamburg
    
    No. No paper filters in espresso machines.

    Whether you're fine with a Bialetti or want an actual espresso machine can only be answered by yourself. The taste is very different. Think 100-120 USD for Bialetti + grinder as opposed to, say, 400-500 USD for the cheapest decent espresso setup. Also consider that you'll need quite a bit of practice to pull a decent espresso.

    If you decide in favour of the Bialetti, have a look at the Bialetti Brikka. Another option to consider is the AeroPress. Pricepoint is relatively similar to the Bialetti and can produce a relatively similar cup to the Brikka with espresso beans. And great "regular" coffee too.

    Above all, get fresh and good beans.
     
  6. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

    Messages:
    25,427
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2008
    Location:
    Wit' Yo' Baby Momma
    

    That was my first reaction!


    Huh. The more you know. So now the question becomes what sort of grinder ought I look for? Now I'm really not sure if I want to take this plunge.
     
  7. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

    Messages:
    8,831
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    At the corner of hipster and hip replacement
    i've been very pleased with my lineup, which i've had for 10-15 years now, using every day. I've got a Rancilio Silvia espresso maker ($685 for the new one, but refurbs start around $450) and a Gaggia MDF grinder ($150 to $200). Both are considered at the low-end of fine espresso, kinda like allan-edmonds shoes v. vass, but i'm a low-end kind of guy. They work well with only slight maintenance, which even an unhandy guy like me can perform (changing grinders, gaskets, etc.)
     
  8. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

    Messages:
    5,624
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    How long does it take the Rancilio to heat up and be ready to brew? How long does it take you to brew a shot? And what's the cleanup time like?

    I've always wanted one, but figured that the setup time each morning would be enough to prevent me from doing it when I'm still in a fog or rushed. Seems to me like you really have to drink a lot of espresso to make a good home machine worth it.

    Not to say I don't still want one...
     
  9. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

    Messages:
    8,831
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    At the corner of hipster and hip replacement
    
    it's really no problem. it heats in like 5 minutes. if you've got longer, that shortens the time between shots. i flip it on before i go for my morning walk. takes 1 minute to grind the coffee, about a minute to prepare and pull the espresso. the biggest time suck is if you're making cappuccinos, because ms. silvia does not have a double boiler, so you have to wait for the boiler to reheat to the higher temp before steaming milk ... and that takes about 1 1/2 minutes, sometimes 2.
     
  10. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

    Messages:
    25,427
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2008
    Location:
    Wit' Yo' Baby Momma
    

    And I'm out.
     
    1 person likes this.
  11. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

    Messages:
    8,831
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    At the corner of hipster and hip replacement
    
    yeah. completelyunderstandable. just buy an aeropress -- $25 at walmart ... you guys do have walmarts in atlanta, right?.
     
  12. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

    Messages:
    19,385
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    only in the nicer parts of town
     
    1 person likes this.
  13. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

    Messages:
    5,624
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    

    Very nice--that's a lot quicker than I thought.

    Didn't realize that about the double boiler, but makes total sense.

    It'd be tempting to plug the thing into a timer switch so that it turns on every morning a few minutes before you wake up.

    Aeropress does make a damn fine cup of coffee, too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2014
  14. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

    Messages:
    8,831
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    At the corner of hipster and hip replacement
    i did think about doing that ... there was some reason not to that popped up on one of the espresso boards. but i can't for the life of me remember what it is. double boiler systems are really nice, but they start at around $1k
     
  15. otc

    otc Senior member

    Messages:
    14,215
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    The moka pot is a bit less sensitive to grind size in my experience (since you grind fairly large for it). I got away with a crappy flat ceramic freebie burr grinder for a long time before I found a metal conical burr grinder for $4 at a thrift shop.

    You could probably do just fine with a cheapo blade grinder (or using the store grinder and just buying in half pound increments) and a moka pot. Would set you back very little money and get you decent coffee.
     
  16. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

    Messages:
    19,385
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    i have a Gaggia, which is cheaper than the Silvia but still a nice machine, and it heats up very quickly. Turn on, get out coffee, grind (if necessary. sorry coffee nerds, but I'm ok with week-old coffee grinds), get out espresso cup, get out sugar (if necessary), pour a glass of orange juice, and by then the "ready" light should be on.
     
  17. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

    Messages:
    8,831
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    At the corner of hipster and hip replacement
    for years i used a krupps home machine. gotta say, the difference between that and a consumer-pro is light years. and freshly ground coffee is a MUST. i buy mine in half-pound bags, 4 pounds at a time. i keep the half-pound i'm using in a vacuum container for the couple days i'm using it, and the rest in the freezer. with a good machine, you can definitely tell the difference between freshly ground and even day-old.
     
  18. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

    Messages:
    19,385
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    see, that sounds like a pain in the ass, especially if you're making cappuccinos or latttes where the day old vs. 1 min. 18 seconds old grind makes no flavor difference
     
  19. b1os

    b1os Senior member

    Messages:
    9,448
    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Location:
    Berlin/Hamburg
    I'd recommend a longer heat up time for the Silvia. 15-30 minutes is fine, or less if you pull water once the boiler reached temperature until it drops below the threshold again, and repeat it a few times (that way you can cut it down to 5-10 minutes). But 5 minutes of regular heat up time, in my experience, is insufficient since the whole machine doesn't heat up and thusly the water cools down too much on the way to the basket and you'll end up with an odd cup of espresso. Again, IME.

    You also have to pull water until the bottom temperature threshold is reached (which you can use to heat up the cup) so that you can regulate the fluctuation of temperature since it varies quite a bit in between the heating cycles. So, for the v2 Silvias (and newer ones): pull water until light turns on, wait until light turns off, then (immediately) pull the espresso. If you want to prepare a cappuccino, do as such, then turn on the steam thing. Fill milk into the pitcher, wait like 30-45 seconds (don't wait until the light goes off since then it won't keep heating, which you want it to do while you're steaming--since it takes a while due to the relatively smallish tank), start steaming (enough tutorials on youtube). Shortly before, or when, the milk is steamed, turn of the steam thingy, then turn on the pump and open the valve such that steam can escape and water gets pulled into the tank again. Meanwhile, clean the lance. Once water releases through the lance, close the valve and turn off the pump. Prepare the cappuccino ("move around" the milk if the steam and milk sepperated too much). Then clean the basket and such. Done.
    Takes around 4-5 minutes in my book.

    And, once again, fresh grounds are a must. Also in cappuccini. And, I guess, in latte macchiati too. You can't pull a decent cup of espresso with day old grounds. And a good cappuccino (or latte macchiato) is based on a good espresso.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2014
  20. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

    Messages:
    8,831
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    At the corner of hipster and hip replacement
    
    with all respect, this is why normal people don't hang out on coffee forums. :foo: i've been using my silvia for 15 years. i've read all the material and heard all the arguments. i think i know what i'm talking about. i didn't say that optimal was 5 minutes. i said it could be used after 5 minutes.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by