Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    ...
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012


  2. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    I prefer tart rings to pans. Better looking results, easier, etc.
     


  3. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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  4. sygyzy

    sygyzy Senior member

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    For woks get the cheapest carbon steel you can. It's the one piece of equipment I think I would not really try to go fancy on. Woks are supposed to be used with super high heat. Carbon steel will naturally be non-stick. Don't get teflon for this application.
     


  5. shibbel

    shibbel Senior member

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    Yeah, this is what I did. Ended up purchasing a traditional Cantonese round bottom Wok with stabilizing ring from the Wok Shop, made in China, for $25. Seasoning looks straight forward, bake on some oil, then char some chives.
     


  6. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    oops. accidentally erased.

    apply thin layer of flaxseed oil with paper towel, preheat oven and pan together, bake at 550 degrees for an hour.

    soybean oil is also a good one and much cheaper.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012


  7. shibbel

    shibbel Senior member

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    That's basically what I do with most of my cast iron stuff, and my De Buyer pans. The Wok Shop recommends charring chives or green onions before cooking to remove any metallic taste the Wok might impart on food. Not sure how true that is.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012


  8. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    i've also heard of frying potato skins. i'm not sure how true either are, but considering they sell the woks i'm sure they know what they're talking about
     


  9. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    I've heard of frying pieces of potato, not just the skin, until completely charred. :laugh:
     


  10. shibbel

    shibbel Senior member

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    Not sure if it's still the case, but the De Buyers pans use to come with seasoning instructions that included boiling potato peels in the pan for 10 minutes.
     


  11. shibbel

    shibbel Senior member

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    Matt, or anyone else familar with this, should the tart ring be seamless? I found this one on Amazon, it's obviously not seamless. I know one should probably own a range of sizes, but would the 9.5" at 3/4" be the most typical size?
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012


  12. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    That is fine. Perfect, in fact.
     


  13. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    OK, so since we're on woks, here's a really random food question:

    I also need a wok. I have a pretty hot stove; kicks out 22K BTU. I know a true wok setup would be more like 30K and I think might also sit on the flame in a little different way... anyways, the question is, how big a wok can I get without overwhelming my burner to the point where I'm not really using the high heat the way I ought to for Chinese food?

    Edit: while we're at it - any good references for the basics of wok/Chinese cooking (yeah, I know that there are 7 kinds of Chinese cooking... just trying to learn a few basics about methods, etc.)? E.g. what high heat does to food that's essential to Chinese food, recommendations on things like oils, other good basics....
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012


  14. shibbel

    shibbel Senior member

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    D, after talking to the Wok Shop in SF, I went with a 16" for a 15,000BTU burner. If you don't get an answer here, I would suggest giving them a call, very knowledgeable people.
     


  15. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    Is there any point to flambe that wouldn't be equally accomplished by having doves magically fly out of the same dish?
     


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