Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    Well its not so much strict as in bulk. I can't exactly Ducasse 5 steaks and then keep them in the fridge for the next 4 days. Kind of pointless.

    I enjoy the skin as well but, at Costco, they only either come bone-in with skin, or boneless without skin. Plus, low slow baking does not a crispy skin make.


    Hmm. Wouldn't that burn the mustardy surface by the time the thigh was cooked through?


    :fistbump: :cheers: :nodding:
     
  2. shibbel

    shibbel Senior member

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    huh?
    

    Forgive me if you're not a complete cooking newb and already know this, but the article doesn't mention tempering the meat first, you always want it to come up to room temperature before cooking.

    I also don't add butter (no need to IMHO, all a good steak needs is salt and pepper) at all- just brush the steak with a neutral oil right before it hits the pan.
     
  3. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Nah. Your thighs are already cooked through. You only want to warm them up. So you rub them in mustard and put them under the broiler. Either way, mustard doesn't burn easily.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  4. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    There is only one thing I know how to make well, and that is reservations.

    My grandmother always used olive oil rather than butter. But she is a guinea.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  5. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    I just meant to finish.


    Yes it does :eh:

     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  6. shibbel

    shibbel Senior member

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    Might be a silly question, since I assume one could rinse off the outer layer with hot water, but how long does stock keep in the freezer? Is there a point when it's trash?

    Edit: Also, I'm making the lobster and leeks recipe from TFL this Saturday, can anyone recommend a good wine to pair it with? Maybe the $30-50 range?
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  7. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    So I've made omelette quite a few times over the last couple of days. I do it the Pepin way. At first I used a spatula to "mix" it in the pan, now I use two chopsticks (better imo!) and then a spatula to fold it. Any obvious improvements other than the shape? Note: this is not the best looking one, just the one I made this morning. It's made with chives and a little parsley. The other days I only used chives.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    +1 on the question.

    The Italian white I posted recently in the delicious wines thread is great with shellfish. So is the Hippolyte Reverdy sancerre, which may be easier to find.
     
  9. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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  10. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    Anyone have any thoughts on salting steaks/chops? Specifically I'm thinking about pork chops - I know that in a perfect world, I'd brine, but theoretically wouldn't just a pre-salting say, I dunno, 1 hour ahead provide some of the same benefits in terms of moisture retention? What are the salient (almost a pun!) differences between salting and brining?
     
  11. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    one hour won't do much for moisture retention, but it will improve the flavor. it really is amazing. if you've got an h our and 3 pork chops to kill, salt one right away, salt the other just efore cooking and then salt the last one after cooking. you'll see the difference.
     
  12. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    cool, thanks for the advice.

    got any links to articles explaining the science behind the water retention angle, just so I understand a little deeper what's going on and why?
     
  13. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    short version of brining (and dry-brining) is that the absorbed salt changes the way the protein fibers react to heat, allowing them to retain more moisture. but for it to work as a brine, it has to have been absorbed deeply into the muscle. the short-term is just a seasoning change ... the salt also brings a slightly different mix of amino acids to the surface, which allows for better browning and improved flavor.
     
  14. Bhowie

    Bhowie Senior member

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    :( We cooked 3 chops 2 days ago, wish we had done this.

    Dried the meat with paper towels and seasoned just before cooking.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  15. shibbel

    shibbel Senior member

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    I didn't bother reading the recipe since it had cranberry marmalade in the title. Unless you're slicing things up and plating for aesthetics, sauces are sacrilege if you ask me :)


    I normally put them through a 6-8-hour dry brine since the wet brines get things mushy at times, and also don't allow for things to crisp up as well. Make sure to season along with the salt if you want the flavors to penetrate the meat more.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012

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