Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    Yeah, Matt, you and Manton turned me on to appreciate more austere, mineral wines. Gomey had a part with his great love of Didier and getting me to try a couple different bottlings from him. I'm not always in the mood for, nor do I think food always needs it, your almost ascetic wines but I do now prefer some minerality and backbone.

    When I first was exploring wines I thought I just did not like Chard due to everything people are saying here about most CA Chards. It took exposure to old world wines for me to start to drink (selected) CA Chards.
     


  2. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    this is true if your standard for balance is typical austere white burgundy. most chablis doesn't use oak and aoc chablis prohibit malo (or only allowed halfway through? something like that)

    i agree with the slutty comment, but i feel like american wines regardless of the varietal are like that. over the top, ripe, juicy. i also think that the same mentality applies to american beers and american takes on traditional styles ie big and slutty
     


  3. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    I really like Chardonnay. In fact, good reco: Kendall Jackson makes an amazing Chardonnay and a lot of places carry it by the glass. Usually it's one of the more expensive wines by the glass, but it's worth springing for. Look for it.
     


  4. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Senior member

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    I'm still a total wine newb but I really don't like California chards. I do prefer minerally whites, but on the other hand, I really enjoy some fruity/floral/tropical varietals like Albarino. I guess it's just that butter or butterscotch taste & mouthfeel that I find off-putting. To me, it's not so much slutty as it is slimy.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2012


  5. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    ever tasted raveneau? toasted oak sells and no one is immune.
     


  6. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    You can't know anything until you know what you like. Having the right lingo, or knowing the crus of Beaujolais from north to south won't get you very far if you haven't any clue why you memorized them or whether you like what you find from there. FWIW, somebody like you should write a paper on the bizarre way that the non-experiential mode of wine connoisseurship has taken over and what that says about us. I think there is a lot of sociological research to be done w/r/t Americans and their wine and their scores.
     


  7. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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  8. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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  9. alexg

    alexg Senior member

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    Didn't he want to do canard a la presse? Or at least just get it at Daniel.
     


  10. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    i think premier cru chablis allows oak, but the vast majority doesn't use oak. i'll check out raveneau

    what do you use that press for?
     


  11. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Ideally for ducks which have been strangled. People here use it more for show, since the pressed juices are not as rich. Raveneau uses a little new oak, Fevre uses quit a bit, I believe. I think Dauvissat uses no new oak at all.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2012


  12. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    i wasn't necessarily recommending it. Raveneau makes fabulous, very expensive, wines. he's probably the most fashionable Chablis producer today (is that right gomey, matt and ksilk?). but his wines are much more burgundian than they are chablisienne. riper and with oak. nice wines, i suppose, but atypical. definitely international in style.

    that press is used to crush the cooked carcasses of roasted ducks, lobsters, etc., to extract every bit of juice and fat that is available.
     


  13. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    so you press the leftovers?

    woah raveneau is pretty expensive, but i guess not unaffordable. i'm going to see if my local wine store has fevre. pricing is much easier and i'd like to taste an oaky chablis
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2012


  14. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    I think he is generally considered the best producer in Chablis. He certainly is not a wild child or anything, but compared to Dauvissat, he is probably cutting edge. Every Raveneau I've ever had has seemed to me to be a very typical Chablis. There is an aroma of, at least for me, walnut oil in Chablis which does not exist elsewhere, and his wines have it in a big way. They are a bit riper than some, though.
     


  15. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    The Chablis that made me fall in love was Dauvissat La Forest. It isn't the most expensive Chablis by any means, but it is fantastic and super typical.
     


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