Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    Joy of Cooking? You can learn techniques a million ways, but you'll only get comfortable doing it via practice.
     


  2. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    i usually do garlic sliver/rosemary/salted anchovies poked into the holes. no basting. nothing in the pan. simple pan sauce when it's done. don't overcomplicate it. if you want to overcomplicate it, there's this.
     


  3. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    Shibbel, definitely try the anchovies with lamb. They deepens the flavor of the roast (and do not add any fishiness).
     


  4. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    exactly. i almost choked in that recent gopnick book where he was talking about having made this lamb and not getting the point of the anchovies, so he covered it with an anchovy puree. after roasting it under ... wait for it ... bacon. the salted anchovies are an umami thing.
     


  5. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Pracitce, practice, practice. Make one chicken every week. Get guinea hens, they have much less meat (and probably are even better in taste). I need to work on it, too. Last week when I did a guinea hen I cut it in half but didn't completely know the anatomy so I had to use the poultry scissors two or three times.
    I suggest deboning a chicken once or twice (ballotine/galantine) - might help a little. Reminds me that I want to do it again soon.
     


  6. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Yeah, I know it takes practice...I was just hoping for something like a class where they break stuff down (maybe trim cuts from other animals too) but maybe have use for the broken down stuff afterwards so I don't have to take it all. Or a soup kitchen that breaks down piles of chickens to make soup that would be happy to have some volunteers.
     


  7. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    You could call your local soup kitchen. i doubt they have whole chickens to butcher, though.
     


  8. VonLehndorff

    VonLehndorff Senior member

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    if your in NY just grab a bunch of pigeons then sell them on Canal
     


  9. Teger

    Teger Senior member

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    foodguy is your peel big and wooden? mine is metal and a big spatula. i bought a pizza screen, which shoudl apparently fix most of the problems
     


  10. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    dude, i'm over 55 ...
    seriously, yeah. and kind of.
     


  11. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    :hide:
     


  12. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    Buy a rotisserie one and eat it. Seriously. The only difference is that you have to knife through the joints/bones instead of them coming undone easily. Do it with your hands then a knife. Plus, you've got dinner and delicious chicken bones waiting for you when you're done, instead of worrying about what to do with a whole raw chicken.
     


  13. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    My wife is sure that I could probably talk my way into a name kitchen, at least as a commis... I am not sure on that myself, as I've seen some of the places on generic job sites calling for commis chefs (Gordon Ramsay here and a few other one or two star places) and they were requiring a year of kitchen work experience, which I don't have, but I guess if it's just a matter of asking, I have nothing to lose. She is a snob and says I should ask at L'Atelier or Pierre Gagnaire, something like that. I realize I wouldn't actually be cooking anything anyway, but still, maybe more sack than I have, to start at 100mph...

    But she says that as someone with the LCB diploma (she got it for fun and has no plans to ever work in a restaurant), and she knows people who have just knocked on doors and asked for jobs, and gotten in, so I want to agree with her - maybe here in Tokyo the huge number of high end restaurants plus the fact that there has to be far fewer culinary school grads (LCB is like, 4X more expensive than a high-end 4 year college education here, tuitions are low in academia) compared to the scene in America helps offset the job market in that way. I can imagine the US being the total inverse right now, hell, I know a few friends from college who got degrees and then went off to culinary school, graduated, and then ended up doing nothing.

    There are some glimmers of possibility, from the stories I've heard - David Chang came out here with that 6 month slip from FCI, speaking no Japanese, and ended up cooking at the restaurant in the Park Hyatt here... one of my favorite chefs worked part-time in a Italian restaurant with no prior training or interest in food, found that he liked cooking, and then worked at Bras and then the Fat Duck.. I met the sous chef at Pierre Gagnaire a couple months ago, and he basically went there and knocked on their door a few times til they let him in. I think with food jobs here, it seems they are pretty accommodating, as long as you look like you have genuine drive and interest. I think the old Japanese guys probably yell at you more, I've seen some of the kitchens here and the young guys look like they have the fear of life in them...
     


  14. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    I hate Adam Gopnik's work. His overwhelming self-satisfaction is truly a drag. What was The New Yorker thinking? Is Tina Brown to blame?
     


  15. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    yeah, it was really, really bad. shame, because i like his art writing (maybe that's because i know next to nothing about art, though). ms. brown has been gone from new yorker for maybe 10 years. the estimable david remnick is the editor now. but i think this book is a solo project done without editing from teh magazine (or, apparently, almost anyone).
     


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