Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH


  2. alexg

    alexg Senior member

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    Goddamn, .001g is insane. Those two extra zeros are totally unnecessary though. I think I found a few more reasonable scales, but they're not kitchen ones. I guess that's alright since the things I'm measuring are barely even food.
     


  3. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    I dunno, might be handy just in case you need a measure of .006g gellan to make a .5" bubble of undefined red sauce topped by a mini-leaf, like mgm :eek:
     


  4. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Le Creuset's manual also says not to throw salt in the plain pan.

    I would get a .01g one. If you need 1.6g of X, it might be 1.55 or 1.64g - that's nearly +-0.5g, 1/32 difference. If you need 0.5g it can be 0.45 or 0.54g +-1/10 etc. If 0.1g...
    I think that can make a difference in molecular stuff. But not completely sure - just heard that it have to be pretty exact amounts.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011


  5. alexg

    alexg Senior member

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    Good point, now I have to go looking again.


    You mean "ketchup"?
     


  6. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    I don't know, does it? Anyway, this is what I was shown by a chef at Eleven Madison Park when I asked what they used to crisp the skin on their fish so nicely. I've done it at home ever since and it always works, so I don't really question it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011


  7. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    I did a little google research and it seems that it most likely is associated with water and salt.
     


  8. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    It was good but a little odd. I don't know how to describe it except to say that there was no relationship between the crust and the meat, though both were good. I fried in vegetable oil. Crust was parm, egg yolk, bread crumbs. Probably would not repeat.

    Since I am here, is there a way to tell if chestnuts are still good from the outside? I peeled a pound and a half, and only about a third of those little fuckers were edible. The rest had mold, but I didn't know until I had gotten both layers off.
     


  9. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Not sure how you can tell before you open them up. I'd be interested if someone else knew, though. I guess just make sure they haven't been sitting for too long when you buy them at the store.
     


  10. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    I'd like to know that, too. I bought the best looking and best feeling ones available (Italy or France) for 7€/kg. There were ones from Turkey for 4.99€/kg and China for 3.99€.
    A few had mold, a couple had worms. All in all okay I guess, but nowhere near perfect.
     


  11. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    I found a great producer from New York: Red Jacket Orchards. Their chestnuts are smaller than what you usually find in stores, sweeter, and even taste great eaten raw. They are also easier to peel and seem to last much longer than other chestnuts.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011


  12. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    Red Jacket Orchards also grows wonderful apricots.
     


  13. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Shiny, firm, heavy feeling for their size.
     


  14. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    I'm opening some right now for later. Here they are.
    [​IMG]
    Compared to a regular chestnut.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2011


  15. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    Geneva is a really nice little town.
     


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