Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Praxair, airgas, etc. You need a container as well.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2011


  2. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Should liquids be cool before adding xanthan gum?
     


  3. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    They needn't be. One of the great things about xanthan is that it has the same texture hot and cold.
     


  4. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    OK. Here's another one. Can corn syrup be used to substitute liquid glucose? I have a tuile recipe that calls for glucose, which I can't find.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2011


  5. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    It glucose syrup is meant by liquid glucose, I'm pretty sure it can.
     


  6. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Should I purchase silver or gold strength gelatin sheets? None of my recipes specify which kind, just the quantity of sheets needed.
     


  7. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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  8. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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  9. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    I have a very large frame of halibut (~11lb.) with which I plan to make fumet. Would it be advisable to remove the skin and head, or can they be of use in the stock?
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2011


  10. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    I wouldn't use skin. The head is fine, but remove the eyes and gills since they give off a bitter flavor.
     


  11. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    OK. Thanks. Would it be alright to add bones from a striped bass, as well? Does striped bass make good stock?
     


  12. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    FAIK, you're only "supposed" to use bones from flat saltwater fish. But I am not sure why that is.
     


  13. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Yes, it makes good stock. Heads are the best for stock, better than bones. Agree with kyle that gills give a bitter taste, but not eyes. Eyes should be fine.
     


  14. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Thank you. I think I will make a fumet with the halibut alone, and then another with the striped bass. I also have a pink snapper carcass, which I assume will be alright to use as well. The halibut is about five feet long. I'm sure I'll have fun cutting that up.
     


  15. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Two reasons, I think. First, French haute cuisine really revolved around turbot, sole and brill for a long time, with salmon being another acceptable fish. Only later on did rouget, bass etc move from the provincial tables to the grand ones. Because of that, their fish was either fatty or flat saltwater, so flat saltwater it was. A lot of French fish stuff, including fillet knives, seem to assume that round fish don't exist. Second, and more importantly, flat saltwater fish are all mild and lean, which is what you need in a fish fumet. Other lean, mild fish are fine, just not fatty. Dory makes the best stock, fwiw.
     


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