Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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    More or less. But why half-ass it? The temperature has some benefit in preventing the starch cells from rupturing and making it gummy.

    ETA: Normally I'd just boil it in water for 12 minutes or whatever. I was talking about this mainly in the context of doing the noodle architecture pictured above.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
  2. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
  3. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    what's the accepted amount of, I guess, for lack of a better word, "outside food" being used at a restaurant? I guess there is no magic percentage or "this food but not that" but like, I wouldn't expect most places to make their own sausage, what about places that use pastries from reputable bakeries or cake shops? just kinda curious.
     
  4. sygyzy

    sygyzy Senior member

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    That's a good question but it's hard to put a value on it. I mean it really depends on what's being brought from the outside and what type of restaurant it is.

    For me, I wouldn't expect a restaurant to make, say a small breakfast sausage. Or produce their own maple syrup.. Obviously, props to those that do. However, I get mad when something is claimed to be homemade but isn't.

    I really love pastrami and corned beef. Neither of which are that difficult to make but I think most would agree with me that it's not trivial. So whenever I go to a breakfast joint or a sandwich shop and they offer a reuben or corned beef hash, I really really hope it's homemade but I suspect/expect it's bought pre-made.
     
  5. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Meh, I totally disagree. There is a reason that traditionally restaurants have used charcutiers for certain things. They are generally best done by a specialist, and often require very different skills from what most restaurants are trying to do well.
     
  6. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    wait ... maybe I'm distracted by the game that's on (totally possible), but how is that disagreeing?
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2011
  7. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    +1 i'd rather go to a place that brought in fra'mani salumi, served it on acme bread with cypress grove cheese than eat another plate of some chef's "experiments" with guanciale.
     
  8. sygyzy

    sygyzy Senior member

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    You're giving "Joe's Corner Deli" too much credit. You make it sound like we're talking about some farm to table restaurant that is featuring sausage from their buddy Carl from Napa Valley.
     
  9. WayneGibbous

    WayneGibbous Senior member

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    I'm going to Toronto in a few weeks for my gf's 30th. Looking for some good general dinner and breakfast ideas. Staying near Queen's Park. Any ideas? Thanks,
     
  10. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    Do not get the SVS Demi. I have the full size one and it is barely big enough. Trust me on this.
     
  11. alexg

    alexg Senior member

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    Is there a good way to cook a whole duck? It's my first time cooking duck at all, I kind of want to separate the breast from the legs to make it easier.
     
  12. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    The past two times I've cooked a whole duck I've broken it down. I'd roast all the bones to make a stock with, then use that stock to braise the legs and thighs in. Or, you could cook them confit, but that takes a long time. Cook the breast separately in a pan on low heat. Be sure to save all the excess skin and trimmings to render out their fat. Just put it all in a saucepan with a bit of water and cook over low heat for an hour or so, then strain. The braised meat will be great to shred and stuff something with. Last time I mixed it with some vegetables, mushrooms, and some of the reduced braising liquid, and wrapped it in watercress leaves.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  13. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    I'm cooking duck Thursday and will also be breaking it down first.
     
  14. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    It really all depends on the kind of duck you are talking about. Duck isn't monolithic, and some are better than others cooked different ways.
     
  15. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Where can I get liquid nitrogen?
     

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