Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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    Quatre Saisons a la Table n. 5?
     


  2. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Oui.
     


  3. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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    Great book. I kind of regret selling my copy, though maybe with the Euro down I should just buy it again.
     


  4. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    It is good. There are some odd errors in it, but they are pretty obvious.
     


  5. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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    My French is good enough to follow the recipes, but not to really dissect it. At the very least it's not comically bad as the English translation of the Ducasse books. I picked up Alleno's newer book, "Terroir Parisien" last year--nice, but the recipes aren't quite as interesting.

    Some pretty good looking books came out/are coming out soon (Briffard, Astrance, Bau, Christian Jurgens, Sven Elverfeld), so what's another 40 euros on top of it. I just wish Lesquer would do a book so I could waste time trying to make this:
    http:[email protected]/4120430886/.
     


  6. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    I have been trying to figure out how to make that for a while. The outside is tedious, but relatively easy, but I have no clue on the filling. I did order the l'Astrance book already, it was supposed to ship a while back, but is obviously delayed.

    The odd thing in that recipe was that it had you cook the chicken at 60 degrees, but then heat it up at the end for an hour or so at 75, which seems to kind of defeat the purpose of heating it at a lower temp. I imagine it was just a typo, so I heated it up lower. Surprisingly, the stuffed turnips were probably the best component. Also the sauce poulette. I'll use his version in the future.
     


  7. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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    I tried to order the paperback version of Astrance and Amazon cancelled it. Should have guessed since the listing page was pretty sparse.

    The few times a while back when i tried to make the Spaghetti fortress I didn't have the right size molds, so i ended up with these giant loaves, on top of the pasta not really working. I think I did that before I actually had it at the restaurant and used a chicken farce or something on the inside, which is wrong--it's actually pretty liquidy. I have a bunch of time off in December and it was something I was going to try making.

    Sans truffles, it should be pretty cheap to make/mess-up a few times. My current thought, that i didn't try last time is to make a thickish cream sauce with mushrooms, add a bit of sheet gelatin, then freeze it in the molds. Then unmold and try to fence with hydrated (in the circulator) spaghetti and maybe a brushing of cream or something to help stick it to the very outside. Parmesan on top/bottom, and in the oven to heat the inside/finish cooking the pasta.

    No idea if that's close to how they do it, but in my head at least, it seems the most feasible way to do it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2011


  8. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    If I were to guess, it would be that the inside was cast in a mold and chilled until set, then the spaghetti was cooked al dente and cut. You'd brush a piece of parchment as long as all the sides of the mold, and the same height, with softened butter, then cover it with the spaghetti and spread the spaghetti with a little chicken mousseline. Then unmold the inside and wrap it with the spaghetti/parchment, chill and then heat it at the end. That is how I know to make timbales in general, though this one could be different.
     


  9. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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    Yea, I had trouble doing it that way because the cooked spaghetti a lot harder to work with than a "normal" timbale with penne or some other big tube shape.
     


  10. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    How do you hydrate pasta in a circulator? I don't think i've ever heard of that.
     


  11. otc

    otc Senior member

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    You should post more...your ability to resist the SF addiction is impressive


    You might not get an answer...I think he has already exceeded his 14 posts per year cap :)
     


  12. sygyzy

    sygyzy Senior member

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    Search for it on Ideas in Food
     


  13. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    couldn't you just put water in the bag?
     


  14. ehkay

    ehkay Senior member

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    70 degrees or so either loose in the water or with a lot of water relative to the weight of the pasta in the bag for about an hour. It hydrates the starch without cooking it and keeps it from getting as gummy and nasty when you actually cook it/reheat it. Cooks a lot faster when you actually do it.
     


  15. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    Wouldn't that be reasonably the same as the effect given by soaking spaghetti in a bowl of room temp tap water for 1 hour, and then cooking in boiling water to a perfect al dente in exactly 59 seconds? It sounds like the use of a circulator there is gratuitous.
     


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