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Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. SField

    SField Senior member

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    what can i do to chicken breast to make it actually taste good

    You can brine... more obvious is to marinate.

    Sear it... 1.5 minutes a side, don't touch it. Let a crust form. Finish in oven.
     
  2. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    I don't think I ever brined anything until the last year. I can't believe what a good technique this is and that I haven't been doing it for years.
     
  3. SField

    SField Senior member

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    I don't think I ever brined anything until the last year. I can't believe what a good technique this is and that I haven't been doing it for years.

    Problem is that I'm guessing that the guy who asked about making a chicken breast taste good is trying to eat really "clean"... so the high sodium would probably not be the best for someone who is either trying to lose weight or to cut to lean mass... I'm sure you'd be retaining a lot of water.
     
  4. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    thanks for the suggestions. brining sounds like fun.


    also, what's the reason you can eat beef somewhat raw, but not pork? is chicken ok if it's slightly pink? i dont get it. like fish you can eat completely raw and you have things like beef tataki, steak tartare, but not pork?
     
  5. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    is chicken ok if it's slightly pink?

    If the meat is close to the bone it should be OK if it is slightly pink. Better safe than sorry however.
     
  6. Johnny_5

    Johnny_5 Senior member

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    what can i do to chicken breast to make it actually taste good

    Good tasting chicken always starts with a quality bird IMO and slowly cooking it. My favorite preparation is to marinade it with some lime, thyme (which i grow on my deck [​IMG] ), salt, pepper, and olive oil. Then I put it on a hot grill at low heat and cook it slowly. It is always cooked perfectly through and is extremely moist.
     
  7. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    thanks for the suggestions. brining sounds like fun.


    also, what's the reason you can eat beef somewhat raw, but not pork? is chicken ok if it's slightly pink? i dont get it. like fish you can eat completely raw and you have things like beef tataki, steak tartare, but not pork?


    Prior to modern animal husbandry methods, pork often had trichinosis.
     
  8. SField

    SField Senior member

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    Good tasting chicken always starts with a quality bird IMO and slowly cooking it. My favorite preparation is to marinade it with some lime, thyme (which i grow on my deck [​IMG] ), salt, pepper, and olive oil. Then I put it on a hot grill at low heat and cook it slowly. It is always cooked perfectly through and is extremely moist.

    Do you have the lid on the whole time? Have you tried brining it first? That will have much more of an effect than a marinade.
     
  9. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    To go along with duck leg confit tomorrow, I want to use some fat and do fingerling potatoes. Wash and halve the taters lengthwise, cook in duck fat at medium high until golden brown?
     
  10. SField

    SField Senior member

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    To go along with duck leg confit tomorrow, I want to use some fat and do fingerling potatoes. Wash and halve the taters lengthwise, cook in duck fat at medium high until golden brown?
    You might want to blanch half way first.
     
  11. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    That's what I was wondering.
     
  12. Johnny_5

    Johnny_5 Senior member

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    Do you have the lid on the whole time? Have you tried brining it first? That will have much more of an effect than a marinade.

    Usually I try to keep the lid down but I keep going back and forth to the BBQ on my deck to check it out of habit pretty often. To be honest, I've never brined in my life. Is there a particular brining technique that you recommend?
     
  13. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    Usually I try to keep the lid down but I keep going back and forth to the BBQ on my deck to check it out of habit pretty often. To be honest, I've never brined in my life. Is there a particular brining technique that you recommend?

    there is a chicken brine recipe/instructions in Ad Hoc. I haven't done the chicken one (only pork), but I've eaten Manton's go at it and the results were fantastic.
     
  14. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    You might want to blanch half way first.

    That's what I was wondering.

    In a restaurant situation, blanch, but the taste is going to be better cooked in the fat the whole way, so I think that is a better way to do it at home.
     
  15. HORNS

    HORNS Senior member

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    Buy better chicken.

    This, and get chicken breasts which are on the bone and with the skin intact - that makes a BIG difference on the flavor and juiciness of the meat. Sear the meat and then roast in the oven at 400 degrees. Use a meat thermometer because it takes the guesswork out. I cook mine to 145 degrees, let it sit for about 10 minutes. You can then leave it whole, carefully debone it, or chop it in slices with the bone intact and serve it.
     
  16. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    In a restaurant situation, blanch, but the taste is going to be better cooked in the fat the whole way, so I think that is a better way to do it at home.

    Medium/high heat? Plan on using a cast iron skillet.
     
  17. SField

    SField Senior member

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    In a restaurant situation, blanch, but the taste is going to be better cooked in the fat the whole way, so I think that is a better way to do it at home.

    That's true. I just don't know how much duck fat you have. No restaurant would ever do that for potatoes... too expensive.
     
  18. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    I have enough to cover the split fingerlings. Barely.
     
  19. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    Medium/high heat? Plan on using a cast iron skillet.

    Relatively low to cook through then frank it and let those babies get some color.
     
  20. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Medium/high heat? Plan on using a cast iron skillet.
    Traditional pommes sarladaise is cooked on about medium with the potatoes turned only once after they have browned, and you add some chopped garlic and parsley at the end. Don't cover the potatoes with fat, but have a nice thick film of it in the pan.
     

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