1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Random fashion thoughts

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by thekunk07, Aug 1, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    33,384
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    The Barena blazers are meant to be essentially cardigans. You really can't think of them as "sportjackets" in the conventional way.
     
  2. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    33,384
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    Oh, and also, the multi-brand vs. Same brand retail model. it's clearly not one or the other. It's a delicate and artful game. And no one does it better than Ralph Lauren.
     
    6 people like this.
  3. Bam!ChairDance

    Bam!ChairDance Senior member

    Messages:
    6,115
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    Location:
    DC
    

    What would you say were some of the bigger mistakes? The lack of an online checkout comes immediately to mind
     
  4. cyc wid it

    cyc wid it Senior member

    Messages:
    10,203
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2011
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    Show prices. Online checkout. Provide measurements.

    How does any store not do this? Much less one that sells very very expensive stuff.

    There are a few other industries that are pretty behind on online retail too.
     
  5. gettoasty

    gettoasty Senior member

    Messages:
    12,283
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Location:
    Home
    To @Biggskip comment I think the point is that multi-brand boutiques offer visibility you would not have at a single-brand retailer. Key being visibility, which in contrast to Atelier and @LA Guy point is that "A" did not have enough of a presence to continue the life cycle of its business, largely in part not understanding consumers that are now more sophisticated in order to evolve its business model concurrently. If you read the first part of the article, it speaks clearly to LA Guy's point. What is salablity when you cannot even connect to your consumer base? Consider the spheres of influence at the internet age; you cannot solely rely on the foot traffic anymore.

    And to your point @Bam!ChairDance I think in tandem with the internet presence or lack thereof, no online checkout just made things worst. Another point I'll add to visibility is convenience.

    Hence, going back to your OP it seems Karlo Steel or friend like me is confused with the definition of a boutique vs. flagship. Under LA Guy's valid explanation, and going back to the article, I agree with Biggskip that a multi-brand vs. single brand is much better as it relates to the changing environment and a reflection of culture(s). Of course, you will have dedicated group of consumers who may shop only with one particular designer only, in which there are several flagship stores across the country, and globe. This in turn may gain enough visibility (accessibility), and even convenience when it comes to shopping granted I do not think it comes close to making a few clicks with your mouse @ home.

    This does then pose another question, does the consumer evolve from the multi-brand boutique to a single-brand store? How are stores nowadays keeping up with the growing consumer?

    Another thought, surely the consumer must have some experience in-person at a boutique, multi-brand or single brand where I think the experience can be invaluable i.e. trying on the clothes, seeing the fabric in person, speaking with more knowledgeable SA's etc. But what happens after the initial discovery? Does it then all become internet based only? I think to the first part, this makes ANY boutique all the more relevant whether it is mutli vs. single, and whether there is an internet following or not.


    I don't think multi-brand boutiques are chaotic, but the problem is how long can they extend the "discovery period" to the point of a sure sale.
     
  6. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

    Messages:
    2,312
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2012
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    In response to the article you posted, I wrote this on another forum - it doesn't immediately address your points, but does speak to the same situation (changing retail environment:

    "I'm not sure how accurate this comparison is, but I see a lot of similarities with the music business.

    Since record labels, music stores, and artists have to compete with free (that is, they have to offer better value than mass downloading) we're seeing a definite shift in the way that music is sold - I'd argue for the better.

    It's no secret that the music business nefariously and perniciously skimmed obscene profis off the backs of the artists - to the point that, in Australia in the 1990s, a CD would cost $25-$30 and an artist would see somewhere in the vicinity of $.50 to $1 of that. Ridiculous!
    Currently, more and more artists are choosing to sell direct which supports them a lot more because their margins are much more realistic (for a $10 DC sold through an online store one doesn't have to sell 100,000 to make a decent living). We're also seeing, at least in Australia, many more bands touring here as that's where their money is made - shows can't really be had for free yet so they are ways of making money - people wil gladly spend $50-$80 for an epic night out, but not so much for a record.

    Comparing this back to clothes - retailers, again in Australia, are often accused of jacking up prices significantly (which, while too simple, is also fairly accurate) and degrading local industry. At the heart of those fairly emotional, economically ignorant and tired rantings is actually some simple truth: for a lot of these retailers no one's getting rich, but everyone's getting screwed.

    However, like snopant, several new producers have started up recently - in the MC side of things - Henry Carter, Owen and James and Suit Shop - all of which provide better product, better service, excellent knowledge and are avilable and friendly (we'll regularly hang out). Which means that buyers are more likely to spend a premium, and also more likely to rebuy.

    For one of the ventures (OJ) it was so successful the owner quit his 9-5 at one of Australia's largest banks and started a FT venture (suit shop). All these businesses are savvy, local, affordable and low overhead. Exactly similar to the success many bands operating mainly online are seeing.

    For better or worse (and it really is a mixture of both) retail is changing - works for me as I live nowhere near anything of value B&M wise."

    Ultimately, Atieler wasn't able to compete because of, as far as I can tell, a luddite/artistic sensability that could not cope with the margins of retail. Would any successful retail business ever, as it says in the BoF article, be nearly impossible to find? How does removing a customer base benefit keeping the doors open? Bizarre choices, poor business sense buoyed up by exclusivity and lack of competition (both now gone). That's how I see it, at least.
     
    2 people like this.
  7. fistinyoface

    fistinyoface Senior member

    Messages:
    828
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2013
    Gothic preists are just being covered too well by other stores. Darklands seems to be doing well for itself and they don't supply measurements (even by email) or have an online checkout.
     
  8. nahneun

    nahneun Senior member

    Messages:
    8,057
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Location:
    facetiousland
    They had a lot of sales associates for such a small store too, but the lack of an online shop presence and competitive international pricing probably hurt them the most.
     
  9. cyc wid it

    cyc wid it Senior member

    Messages:
    10,203
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2011
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    This makes me wonder how Archive in SF survives. The local customer base can't be that big...
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2013
  10. gettoasty

    gettoasty Senior member

    Messages:
    12,283
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Location:
    Home
    ^I thought they closed down TBH...or was that another store? I thought the owner moved back to online space or something.

    Also, Project Runway contestant worked there right?? YES :nodding:
     
  11. djt00

    djt00 Senior member

    Messages:
    527
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2012
    I think I'm losing my interest in fashion. It's not that I've stopped caring about how I look. It's just that I've stopped enjoying searching new stuff, so there's nothing I'd really want atm. I haven't even bought anything new clothing related for a while now (except beanie from Zam which was super nice and warm enough for cold Finnish weather).
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  12. Isachenko

    Isachenko Senior member

    Messages:
    618
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2013
    Location:
    community
  13. thewho13

    thewho13 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,648
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    Boscago
    "They obviously have no shame, unlike the Japanese."

    Wtf.
     
  14. Bam!ChairDance

    Bam!ChairDance Senior member

    Messages:
    6,115
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2007
    Location:
    DC
    

    there are lots of ways to sustain an interest in fashion without buying stuff, though, no?
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. Isachenko

    Isachenko Senior member

    Messages:
    618
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2013
    Location:
    community
    The junk/mediocre/bland to worth buying ratio is infinitesimally small unfortunately. (Un)luckily for me I'm used to that with vintage records, some days I'll look through 10,000 listings on eBay for 78s and not find one disc I want to bid on. The grind can be horrendous, however worthwhile.
     
  16. Isachenko

    Isachenko Senior member

    Messages:
    618
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2013
    Location:
    community
    gdl just posted in recent purchases about how the Japanese don't gouge their buyers in relation to the states. Difference being I doubt Buttero will be offering 70% off these burgundies ever, which would decrease the mark-up over retail to 'just' 40%.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2013
  17. cyc wid it

    cyc wid it Senior member

    Messages:
    10,203
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2011
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    Cordovan is more expensive and harder to work with. Goddamnit you got me to click the button.
     
    2 people like this.
  18. gettoasty

    gettoasty Senior member

    Messages:
    12,283
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Location:
    Home
    UPS may have lost these :(

    [​IMG]

    first for everything
     
  19. jet

    jet Senior member

    Messages:
    20,965
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Location:
    socal
    

    I like this guy
     
  20. Isachenko

    Isachenko Senior member

    Messages:
    618
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2013
    Location:
    community
    toasty,

    You're kidding, what fucking high end retailer uses UPS?

    Just realized my Peter Millar coat was just sent UPS. [​IMG] (In my defense Neiman was in the ghetto category for me.)
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2013
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by