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Random fashion thoughts

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by thekunk07, Aug 1, 2009.

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  1. tokyocean

    tokyocean Senior member

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    I guess I can consider myself more of a youngster compared to many of the folks here. Anyway, I went from being fine with wearing non-selvage denim, but I guess I can't go back now that I've come to love selvage. Raw denim is rather new to me. I'm actually working on my first pair of raw selvage denim; it's from Naked & Famous. I've learned a lesson, however. I won't be sizing down ridiculously anymore. These jeans are great, but they feel uncomfortable even after weeks of wearing them.
     
  2. michaelyork

    michaelyork Senior member

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    LAGuy, what you are referring to as "serendipitous" discovery is a very real thing, and you are correct in saying it occurs naturally, in the non-Internet world, by chance--"serenditipitously"--and therefore there has no analog in the world of online advertising where what you see in terms of online advertising is selected based on similarities to and patterns of past interest.

    I make sure I go to Chapters every week and then "browse" the magazines and books, picking up whatever I see that looks interesting. I did so today, in fact. Some idiot misplaced a magazine on hobby yachting in the Current events periodicals today, and I had a great read about the America's Cup.
    Nowhere is "serendipitous discovery" more prominent than in music. I was at the Starbucks attached to the Chapters, and they were playing something very 70s jazzy, which I liked. I shazamed it. It was "Pieces of Dreams" by Stanley Turrentine. I came back and listened to Turrentine on Youtube for hours. Youtube's recommended links had loads of related Turrentine pieces, other 60s and 70s jazz hits, other saxophonists, etc--what you'd call "social discovery" although this was a solo act. I had a great evening.

    When I was in high school, I had a great aunt who sent everyone a Christmas hamper for the holiday season. In it, she would put a mixture of all sorts of new foods. In Grade 11, I discovered the dessert known as "halwa", an Arabic tahini-based confection. I had no clue something like this existed before. Since then, it's become one of my staples, though finding good halwa is always tricky and few people have heard of it.

    However--I disagree with you that Trunk Club qualifies as trying to bring serendipitous discovery online. Just the act of having to tell them what you like for them to assemble the hamper negates the serendipity element of it. There is most certainly serendipitous discovery in fashion. It can be something we see someone wearing on the street, or Ryan Gosling wearing in a movie or in a photo in GQ which we looked at because it was on the table at the barber's when we were waiting to get that haircut.

    Excuse me, but Trunk Club is another idiotic startup with a stupid idea to masquerade selling cheap stuff to a gullible customer as "serendipitous discovery". It is doomed to failure, just give it time.
     
  3. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    I started off by saying that there are lots of different types of discoverability. I am personally preoccupied with serendipitous and social discoverability, and so I tend to shoehorn things into those categories, but really, Trunk Club falls into a category that distinct, but related to both - the "expert advisor". The experience is not unlike the experience of having an SA at a good store who picks out pieces for you, and you pick and choose from their more manageable selection. This was going on offline long before the internet. Personal shoppers would do the shopping for a client, and then ship a package off to the client. The client gets the package, keeps what he or she likes, and sends back everything else. It wasn't a service that I used then, and it's unlikely a service I would use now, mainly because I was a reasonably good stylist myself, and I also love shopping. However, there were definitely people for whom such a service was useful. A company like Trunk Club operates in a similar way, except that you don't develop a personal relationship with the person who is servicing you.

    I think that the real question is whether there is a sufficient demand for this kind or service to support a company like Trunk Club - i,.e. whether there is a market for this type of service outside of high spenders, for whom this service was normally reserved. Those shoppers are often extremely picky, but they also have a great deal of loyalty to their service provider and trust in his or her tastes, and pretty much are still the meal ticket for good SAs, all of whom have their jealously guarded client books. There is a service that actually works pretty well - Birchbox sends samples each month, based on a personal profile, of mostly beauty and fragrance products, and the customer can buy full sized products at their online store. I assume that they can adapt the sample boxes according to the full-sized purchases as well. However, the offline analogy to this - the department store or specialty shop beauty bar - is widely used by women (mostly) from a broad range of socio-economic classes. imo, Trunk Club probably has a tougher road to walk. But I haven't seen their business model, and the devil is always in the details.

    @Noctone , incidentally. "curated" stores, like NMWA, or the increasingly intertwined "advertorial", like any Japanese magazine like Men's Ex and No-No, or the feature articles in Mr. Porter, are partial solutions to this type of "expert advice" discoverability.

    None of these solutions, imo, adequately addresses the issue of seredipitous discoverability on the internet. A lot of very smart people are stumbling around in the dark, trying to solve this problem, and afaik, the solution has not yet been found. You are not going to get from NMWA to a place that sells really great pizza. On a street in NYC, you can easily go from the cool shop that you like, to a nice restaurant, or conversely, from your favorite reataurant, to a really cool store about which you know nothing, and the products of which you had no interest in until the moment that you laid eyes of them (and which you don't even know the names of until someone tells you.)
     
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  4. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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    I figured that out afterwards, it still doesn't change the fact, that as a non american resident, it's not really an attractive service, due to shipping costs etc.

    One thing I noticed on their site, is they don't ask for your build, that sounds like a problem waiting to happen.

    The whole box concept isn't a new one, there has been dog boxes (dog treats, toys etc) for years and there's an almost 15ish years old service here, where you can get the seasons organic vegetable, fish and meats, sent to your door every week, it is pretty nice and it comes with recipes so you don't end up with something you don't know how to use.




    YES :slayer:
     
  5. gettoasty

    gettoasty Senior member

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    This whole idea isn't new. In fact the virtual world had this concept way before it took to life in the real world. If you ever played MMORPGs the pioneers or avatars that started since inception disliked the idea of a store where you can buy things in lieu of grinding and hunting for loot. The whole idea of discoverability became void when cash shops were introduced and avatars started getting geared [dressed] up without any real experience or exposure. It just took the thrill out of finding unique items on your own. In turn, the same pioneers boycotted the cash shop, which led to friction between the developers.

    I see similarities here with the backlash and discussion.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
  6. Biggen

    Biggen Senior member

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    Not sure where you live but if you have a COS store nearby I would go there. Recently picked a nice one from them that also had some elastane mixed in to the fabric which makes the shirt really comfortable.
     
  7. robinsongreen68

    robinsongreen68 Senior member

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    thought i'd post this here, i hadn't seen it before. a very comprehensive-looking history of all the various margiela lines plus a brief biography of the man ( i didn't know he was a design assistant to Gaultier..) and some interesting excerpts from statements released by the maison etc.

    http://www.thirdlooks.com/2012/11/maison-martin-margiela-reference-guide/#fn57

    “We prefer not to interpret our work, preferring to leave that up to others better placed to place our work in an overall context. We all have work that we love, though, possibly regrettably, as a team we have no real connection to the Art world. Fashion is a craft, a technical know-how and not an art. Each world shares an expression through creativity though through very divergent media and processes.”

    “To our mind the work of a fashion designer is so different from that of an artist! We usually work in a necessarily more collaborative manner. We present our work twice a year, using the same medium, respecting the same human form, within an industrial framework, using industrial means of production, and having our work translated through the chain of distribution for our work. Artists are freer to determine the medium with which they choose to express themselves, the intervals at which they present their work, the means by which they produce their expression, as well as the way in which it is sold.”

    much prefer this kind of stuff to the angsty/romanticised vision that rei seemed to be putting forward in that statement of hers.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
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  8. pronxs

    pronxs Senior member

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    those fuckers who see any ads should install adblock in chrome/ff.

    (unless you are browsing from company pc, which means you should not be browsing SF anyway)
     
  9. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    really interesting stuff. i think that statement is good. i still have my issues with it though. hah. guess this sort of thing is kind of an obsession for me. it's so hard to draw the line between art and industry. it's like trying to define pornography, i suppose. but reading this i immediately thought of painters' studios back in the day, where a team of people might work on a piece. it was more industrial, i guess, but still defined as art. though it wasn't mass produced, so perhaps that's the difference. but then you have someone like Warhol who had a studio he literally called the Factory where he blurred that line. anyway, still interesting. thanks for posting.
     
  10. robinsongreen68

    robinsongreen68 Senior member

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    more rambling art/fashion thoughts

    yeah exactly, the renaissance or the school of delft sprang to mind for me as well but perhaps more recently artists did move into genuinely industrial production methods: at his pre-2008 peak damien hirst had huge warehouses full of workers producing spin paintings by the thousands. then having pretty much flooded the market he (allegedly) bought back a ton of inventory via his dealer and the auction houses, and made a much-touted return to the 'tortured romantic' archetype by sacking his whole team and making (bad) paintings alone in his garden shed.
    another angle i think is interesting is the way the 'culture industry' attaches to a particular figure and grants them a cachet that translates into a very real form of capital- (eg the way clement greenberg hyped the abstract expressionists). surely margiela has benefited from this type of consensus as much as anyone in the fashion industry. (in this connection it's interesting to note that one of the sources/interviewers quoted in the article is chris dercon, now director of tate modern and one of the most important figures in the art world)
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
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  11. ghdvfddzgzdzg

    ghdvfddzgzdzg Senior member

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    Just called yoox for a (successful) price adjustment. The hold music was real laid back.
     
  12. caseyfud

    caseyfud Senior member

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    Zara has one
     
  13. conceptual 4est

    conceptual 4est The Classic Gentleman is Back

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    Happy Birthday Teger, I hope you're in as good of a mood today in real life as you normally are on SF!
     
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  14. Raindrop

    Raindrop Senior member

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    Layers upon layers..brr
     
  15. Bam!ChairDance

    Bam!ChairDance Senior member

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    comfortable
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
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  16. Nil

    Nil Senior member

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    I was planning on buying a pair of Ann D boots from the Barneys Warehouse sale recently but stopped to go take care of something before ordering. Came back 5 minutes later and it was sold out. Ah well. It's all in the game. But I just saw what I suspect is the guy who bought them trying to flip them for a roughly 100% profit on Ebay. Asshole. :fu:
     
  17. Bam!ChairDance

    Bam!ChairDance Senior member

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    Maybe the spectacle of watching that guy relist those boots over and over again as the months turn into years will make up for it.
     
  18. Nil

    Nil Senior member

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    The schadenfreude will certainly soothe my burning rage.
     
  19. canstyleace

    canstyleace Senior member

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    could barely tolerate a thin cotton vneck sweater today :fu:
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
  20. crosswound

    crosswound Senior member

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    clicked the trunk club outfitter ad so hard my arm broke through my desk. then a ad popped out saying learn one weird trick.....
     
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