Random fashion thoughts

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by thekunk07, Aug 1, 2009.

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  1. snowmanxl

    snowmanxl Senior member

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    whats the significance of bondage in fashion? when/where did it start?
    preferably id like to hear a serious response from fuuma because hes da best bro. da best
     


  2. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    it's semi smart, depends on what they really put in there in the end. I think a) Americans are too pessimistic and don't have the cultural tradition of the fukubukuro/grab bag, and b) and they're not as good with numbers and valuations - this might be the first and last year of the Porter grab bag.
     


  3. theom-

    theom- Senior member

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    I can't help but feel like those bags really aren't a good deal I mean they're putting sale merchandise and labeling the value at the retail prices.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2011


  4. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    In Japan they typically give you stuff at cost and can size up the bags per body size as well sometimes - not horrible if you really like the store, say, Undercover.
     


  5. sipang

    sipang Senior member

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    1970s > punk movement > Vivienne Westwood etc


    I'm no Fuuma... :confused:
     


  6. snowmanxl

    snowmanxl Senior member

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    so V.W brought it into the fashion scene?
     


  7. sipang

    sipang Senior member

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    I'm sure there were others but VW's role was prominent


    [​IMG]


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  8. snowmanxl

    snowmanxl Senior member

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    oh wow. its amazing how much her aesthetic changed, its all dandy-ish now
     


  9. KingJulien

    KingJulien Senior member

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    I think Gaultier did a lot to bring bondage into fashion in the '80s but I could be wrong.

    Does anyone know if there are any retailers that ship the Takahiro Miyashita line to the US?
     


  10. Desi

    Desi Senior member

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    IF in soho.

    ^^

    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2011


  11. Fuuma

    Fuuma Franchouillard Modasse

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    Second Exhibit. Here is a book to be purchased at airport magazine stands and in "adult" bookstores, a relatively cheap paperback, not an expensive coffee-table item appealing to art lovers and the bien-pensant like The Last of the Nuba. Yet both books share a certain community of moral origin, a root preoccupation: the same preoccupation at different stages of evolution-the ideas that animate The Last of the Nuba being less out of the moral closet than the cruder, more efficient idea that lies behind SS Regalia. Though SS Regalia is a respectable British-made compilation (with a three-page historical preface and notes in the back), one knows that its appeal is not scholarly but sexual. The cover already makes that clear. Across the large black swastika of an SS armband is a diagonal yellow stripe which reads "Over 100 Brilliant Four-Color Photographs Only $2.95," exactly as a sticker with the price on it used to be affixed—part tease, part deference to censorship—on the cover of pornographic magazines, over the model's genitalia. [Oct. 1971 Playboy cover; May 2003 Entertainment Weekly Dixie Chicks Cover]

    There is a general fantasy about uniforms. They suggest community, order, identity (through ranks, badges, medals, things which declare who the wearer is and what he has done: his worth is recognized), competence, legitimate authority, the legitimate exercise of violence. But uniforms are not the same thing as photographs of uniforms—which are erotic materials and photographs of SS uniforms are the units of a particularly powerful and widespread sexual fantasy. Why the SS? Because the SS was the ideal incarnation of fascism's overt assertion of the righteousness of violence, the right to have total power over others and to treat them as absolutely inferior. It was in the SS that this assertion seemed most complete, because they acted it out in a singularly brutal and efficient manner; and because they dramatized it by linking themselves to certain aesthetic standards. The SS was designed as an elite military community that would be not only supremely violent but also supremely beautiful. (One is not likely to come across a book called "SA Regalia." The SA, whom the SS replaced, were not known for being any less brutal than their successors, but they have gone down in history as beefy, squat, beerhall types; mere brownshirts.)
    SS Uniforms page in Pia, SS Regaliapage spread in Pia, SS-Regalia
    Uniforms in "Mark's bunker"
    from a militaria collector's website

    SS uniforms were stylish, well-cut, with a touch (but not too much) of eccentricity. Compare the rather boring and not very well cut American army uniform: jacket, shirt, tie, pants, socks, and lace-up shoes—essentially civilian clothes no matter how bedecked with medals and badges. SS uniforms were tight, heavy, stiff and included gloves to confine the hands and boots that made legs and feet feel heavy, encased, obliging their wearer to stand up straight. As the back cover of SS Regalia explains:

    The uniform was black, a colour which had important overtones in Germany. On that, the SS wore a vast variety of decorations, symbols, badges to distinguish rank, from the collar runes to the death's-head. The appearance was both dramatic and menacing.

    The cover's almost wistful come-on does not quite prepare one for the banality of most of the photographs. Along with those celebrated black uniforms, SS troopers were issued almost American-army-looking khaki uniforms and camouflage ponchos and jackets. And besides the photographs of uniforms, there are pages of collar patches, cuff bands, chevrons, belt buckles, commemorative badges, regimental standards, trumpet banners, field caps, service medals, shoulder flashes, permits, passes-few of which bear either the notorious runes or the death's-head; all meticulously identified by rank, unit, and year and season of issue. Precisely the innocuousness of practically all of the photographs testifies to the power of the image: one is handling the breviary of a sexual fantasy. For fantasy to have depth, it must have detail. What, for example, was the color of the travel permit an SS sergeant would have needed to get from Trier to Lübeck in the spring of 1944? One needs all the documentary evidence.
    Mishima Confessions Mask 1958 ggle books;
    synopsis

    Anger' Scorpio Rising Scorpio Rising (1964):
    imdb; YouTube trailer
    (The motorcycle scenes are from Scorpio Rising.)
    Visconti Damned 1969-wikipedia; YouTube short;
    film still

    Cavani Night Porter
    1974-wiki; YouTube short

    If the message of fascism has been neutralized by an aesthetic view of life, its trappings have been sexualized. This eroticization of fascism can be remarked in such enthralling and devout manifestations as Mishima's Confessions of a Mask and Sun and Steel, and in films like Kenneth Anger's Scorpio Rising and, more recently and far less interestingly, in Visconti's The Damned and Cavani's The Night Porter.

    The solemn eroticizing of fascism must be distinguished from a sophisticated playing with cultural horror, where there is an element of the put-on. The poster Robert Morris made for his recent show at the Castelli Gallery is a photograph of the artist, naked to the waist, wearing dark glasses, what appears to be a Nazi helmet, and a spiked steel collar, attached to which is a stout chain which he holds in his manacled, uplifted hands. Morris is said to have considered this to be the only image that still has any power to shock: a singular virtue to those who take for granted that art is a sequence of ever-fresh gestures of provocation. But the point of the poster is its own negation. Shocking people in the context also means inuring them, as Nazi material enters the vast repertory of popular iconography usable for the ironic commentaries of Pop Art. Still, Nazism fascinates in a way other iconography staked out by the pop sensibility (from Mao Tse-tung to Marilyn Monroe) does not. No doubt, some part of the general rise of interest in fascism can be set down as a product of curiosity. For those born after the early 1940s, bludgeoned by a lifetime's palaver, pro and con, about communism, it is fascism—the great conversation piece of their parents' generation—which represents the exotic, the unknown. Then there is a general fascination among the young with horror, with the irrational. Courses dealing with the history of fascism are, along with those on the occult (including vampirism), among the best attended these days on college campuses. And beyond this the definitely sexual lure of fascism, which SS Regalia testifies to with unabashed plainness, seems impervious to deflation by irony or over-familiarity.

    In pornographic literature, films, and gadgetry throughout the world, especially in the United States, England, France, Japan, Scandinavia, Holland, and Germany, the SS has become a referent of sexual adventurism. Much of the imagery of far-out sex has been placed under the sign of Nazism. Boots, leather, chains, Iron Crosses on gleaming torsos, swastikas, along with meat hooks and heavy motorcycles, have become the secret and most lucrative paraphernalia of eroticism. In the sex shops, the baths, the leather bars, the brothels, people are dragging out their gear. But why? Why has Nazi Germany, which was a sexually repressive society, become erotic? How could a regime which persecuted homosexuals become a gay turn-on?

    A clue lies in the predilections of the fascist leaders themselves for sexual metaphors. Like Nietzsche and Wagner, Hitler regarded leadership as sexual mastery of the "feminine" masses, as rape. (The expression of the crowds in Triumph of the Will is one of ecstasy; the leader makes the crowd come.) Left-wing movements have tended to be unisex, and asexual in their imagery. Right-wing movements, however puritanical and repressive the realities they usher in, have an erotic surface. Certainly Nazism is "sexier" than communism (which is not to the Nazis' credit, but rather shows something of the nature and limits of the sexual imagination).

    Of course, most people who are turned on by SS uniforms are not signifying approval of what the Nazis did, if indeed they have more than the sketchiest idea of what that might be. Nevertheless, there are powerful and growing currents of sexual feeling, those that generally go by the name of sadomasochism, which make playing at Nazism seem erotic. These sadomasochistic fantasies and practices are to be found among heterosexuals as well as homosexuals, although it is among male homosexuals that the eroticizing of Nazism is most visible. S-m, not swinging, is the big sexual secret of the last few years.
    [5] It was Genet, in his novel Funeral Rites, who provided one of the first texts that showed the erotic allure fascism exercised on someone who was not a fascist. Another description is by Sartre, an unlikely candidate for these feelings himself, who may have heard about them from Genet. In La Mort dans l’âme (1949), the third novel in his four-part Les Chemins de la liberté, Sartre describes one of his protagonists experiencing the entry of the German army into Paris in 1940: "[Daniel] was not afraid, he yielded trustingly to those thousands of eyes, he thought 'Our conquerors!' and he was supremely happy. He looked them in the eye, he feasted on their fair hair, their sunburned faces with eyes which looked like lakes of ice, their slim bodies, their incredibly long and muscular hips. He murmured: 'How handsome they are!' . . . Something had fallen from the sky: it was the ancient law. The society of judges had collapsed, the sentence had been obliterated; those ghostly little khaki soldiers, the defenders of the rights of man, had been routed. ... An unbearable, delicious sensation spread through his body; he could hardly see properly; he repeated, gasping, 'As if it were butter—they're entering Paris as if it were butter.' He would like to have been a woman to throw them flowers."

    Between sadomasochism and fascism there is a natural link. "Fascism is theater," as Genet said.[5] As is sadomasochistic sexuality: to be involved in sadomasochism is to take part in a sexual theater, a staging of sexuality. Regulars of sadomasochistic sex are expert costumers and choreographers as well as performers, in a drama that is all the more exciting because it is forbidden to ordinary people. Sadomasochism is to sex what war is to civil life: the magnificent experience. (Riefenstahl put it: "What is purely realistic, slice of life, what is average, quotidian, doesn't interest me." As the social contract seems tame in comparison with war, so fucking and sucking come to seem merely nice, and therefore unexciting. The end to which all sexual experience tends, as Bataille insisted in a lifetime of writing, is defilement, blasphemy. To be "nice," as to be civilized, means being alienated from this savage experience—which is entirely staged.

    Sadomasochism, of course, does not just mean people hurting their sexual partners, which has always occurred—and generally means men beating up women. The perennial drunken Russian peasant thrashing his wife is just doing something he feels like doing (because he is unhappy, oppressed, stupefied; and because women are handy victims). But the perennial Englishman in a brothel being whipped is re-creating an experience. He is paying a whore to act out a piece of theater with him, to reenact or reevoke the past—experiences of his schooldays or nursery which now hold for him a huge reserve of sexual energy. Today it may be the Nazi past that people invoke, in the theatricalization of sexuality, because it is those images (rather than memories) from which they hope a reserve of sexual energy can be tapped. What the French call "the English vice" could, however, be said to be something of an artful affirmation of individuality; the playlet referred, after all, to the subject's own case history. The fad for Nazi regalia indicates something quite different: a response to an oppressive freedom of choice in sex (and in other matters), to an unbearable degree of individuality; the rehearsal of enslavement rather than its reenactment.

    The rituals of domination and enslavement being more and more practiced, the art that is more and more devoted to rendering their themes, are perhaps only a logical extension of an affluent society's tendency to turn every part of people's lives into a taste, a choice; to invite them to regard their very lives as a (life) style. In all societies up to now, sex has mostly been an activity (something to do, without thinking about it). But once sex becomes a taste, it is perhaps already on its way to becoming a self-conscious form of theater, which is what sadomasochism is about: a form of gratification that is both violent and indirect, very mental.

    Sadomasochism has always been the furthest reach of the sexual experience: when sex becomes most purely sexual, that is, severed from personhood, from relationships, from love. It should not be surprising that it has become attached to Nazi symbolism in recent years. Never before was the relation of masters and slaves so consciously aestheticized. Sade had to make up his theater of punishment and delight from scratch, improvising the decor and costumes and blasphemous rites. Now there is a master scenario available to everyone. The color is black, the material is leather, the seduction is beauty, the justification is honesty, the aim is ecstasy, the fantasy is death.
     


  12. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    I don't think that it will work in the US for a variety of reasons.

    1) Japanese markup is about 180% wholesale, while North American markup is usually about 230% wholesale - there are considerably different spending habits in Japan than in the US that allows markups in Japan to be relatively low, not least of all that Japanese consumers are more likely to buy at retail. For this reason
    2) seasonal sales (at least from what I've seen) are considerably less common, and discounts less common.
    3) a 75% off grab bag is likely to yield good value. Right now, sale prices average around 50% off, and go up to 75% off, with a lot of things still available, even at that price. There is therefore no or little incentive for me to buy a bunch of unknown stuff for just 75% off.

    So, the not particularly observation is that retail practices must match the local retail culture. Lots of European and US companies have tried to break into the lucrative Japanese market and failed. There's no reason to expect that the converse would/will not also be true.
     


  13. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    don't know if it's a number game so much as American people loving and expecting absolute control with their money - in Japan it's the same way but the New Year's fukubukuro is one of the traditional things (before the advent of fashion and retail stores, lol) where it was a given that you were throwing your money away to gamble for a prize. Cultural loophole. They don't have gambling here but they're always bursting at their seams to gamble, so anything like that lets off some steam.

    There are virtual grab bags for hundreds of thousands of dollars at department stores - prizes range from cars and homes, and other high-value items. Once you get to that level, naturally, the contents do not disappoint as much as say, the $100 grab bag from a no-name boutique. I mean, you gotta keep in mind the kind of grab brags you guys would be interested in on styleforum still cost $200-300, maybe $500. Can't put more than a few items in unless they charge that much.
     


  14. Lane

    Lane Senior member

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    are motherfuckers serious out here? this PM pissed me off so much. Why do people feel an assortment of crap is a good offer for a leather. I'm kinda overreacting here, but selling expensive things is so frustrating.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2011


  15. Kid Nickels

    Kid Nickels Senior member

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    you're taking your Guidi's to Cambodge? may I ask why? I think I wore nothing but Chucks & flip-flops the whole time I was there. I think it goes w/o saying you don't want to attract attention ......
     


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