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Random fashion thoughts

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by thekunk07, Aug 1, 2009.

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  1. notwithit

    notwithit Senior member

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    I see the whole lumber-workwear-icana as a slightly different animal than goth ninja. Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't the former start out in the realm of mid-level streetwear, whereas the latter came from runway designers and fashion houses?

    Also, I see workwear - at least among the unwashed masses in America - as to some extent a reflection of the economic climate. As the job market grew worse and worse, the "manly man" identity provided a sense of security that employment, once taken for granted, could not.
     
  2. afixedpoint

    afixedpoint Senior member

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    Wore my tiger fleece for the first time today, so incredibly warm
     
  3. artishard116

    artishard116 Senior member

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    :facepalm:
    Americans don't have jobs so they go out and buy $200 chambray shirts?
     
  4. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    This type of analysis is shit. I rejoiced when I heard Simon Doonan say the same. Fashion designers don't design with the economic climate in mind. Retail buyers do become more conservative. However, the whole idea that people turn to the idea of the "manly man" IN FASHION because the economic climate is bad, is preposterous.
     
  5. shoreman1782

    shoreman1782 Senior member

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    Don't have an in-depth trend family tree on hand, but I'd say the Americana resurgence was in pretty full force before the streetwear scene really hopped on it--altho they're certainly not unrelated.

    The goth ninja thing, as I understood it, is still related to music/art scenes from the 80s, rather than really coming from big design houses (hard to define anyway).
     
  6. artishard116

    artishard116 Senior member

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    Right because these manly 'workwear' brands aren't cheap. Which is kind of an oxymoron in itself. Nobody actually works in that stuff, it's fashion like you said.
     
  7. Nouveau Pauvre

    Nouveau Pauvre Senior member

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    I dunno man. I know carpenters and electricians who love their selvage, Tattoo artists too if that counts.

    Of course these are guys who are punks and young east coasters, not claiming that some contractor in Idaho is gonna blow a paycheck on some iron hearts.
     
  8. Manfred Freitag

    Manfred Freitag Well-Known Member

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    I had some seriously shit jobs in my life. Asbestos removal, cleaning the inside of coal plant boilers, working inside nuclear reactors, chicken processing plants, etc. I did all of that work in $29 Sears Diehard boots and $7 flannel shirts from Kmart and they served me just fine.

    So, briefly self-psychoanalyzing, I think I buy higher-end "work wear" as a giant FUCK YOU to that world I could've spent the rest of my life trapped inside. There is no nobility in there, just an endless back-breaking shit sandwich that killed my father and uncles before they even met their grandkids. So if I want to rock some bowery boots and a chambray workshirt it's not out of an atavistic need to recapture a bygone American era. It's my way of honoring my own narrow escape.

    Or maybe I'm easily manipulated by advertising, who knows?[​IMG]








    '
     
    2 people like this.
  9. notwithit

    notwithit Senior member

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    I redact my comments and admit that I am an idiot. :embar:

    Guess I was talking more so about the common man "rediscovering" "heritage brands". Resurgence of LL Bean and all that.

    I missed that part where actual designers were making flannels and work boots and shit, and I was talking about the buyers and consumers rather than the designers.
     
  10. artishard116

    artishard116 Senior member

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    That's all I mean. I know there's exceptions.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2011
  11. Fuuma

    Fuuma Senior member

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    The mainline/runway stuff is usually very well constructed with pretty rare/high quality buttons and custom or at least pricey fabric, the average Lanvin fabric costs twice the average YSL fabric and I know this from the fine folks at YSL. You're probably talking about the business suiting line which is, indeed, not that good. Quality also went down in recent yrs (post recession) and so did price/fabrics and pretty much everything else.

    Old runway Lanvin has terrific finishing at the collar, full canvassing, "french" lining, very rare buttons, ready to open cuffs and a slew of other details meaning quality. Fabrics were often rare and/or custom, sometimes silk/cotton or other great blends. I can recognize signs of quality and has some pretty competent people look at Lanvin pieces so I'm not just talking as a customer who has seen a few jackets.
     
  12. 1969

    1969 Senior member

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    I bought a bunch of gym clothes yesterday. I had honestly forgotten what it was like to spend $200 and get more than one thing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2011
    3 people like this.
  13. brad-t

    brad-t Senior member

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    Wow SZ is launching a magazine? Pretty impressive.
     
  14. mike868y

    mike868y Senior member

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    I know nothing about women's fashion, but how come it seems like girls can get way better looking clothing for cheap than guys can?
     
  15. Teger

    Teger Senior member

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    because the market exists. the average woman cares more about how she wears than the average guy.
     
  16. nahneun

    nahneun Senior member

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    Mmm....so I have a taupe shirt, but I'm not really digging the color that much against my asian skin tone. Would it be a really bad idea to dunk the entire thing in bleach until it turns white? Would this adversely affect all the buttons too lol

    Dumb, but serious question :x
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2011
  17. brad-t

    brad-t Senior member

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    pretty sure you can't just bleach something white, though i could be wrong
     
  18. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    This is crap, man. Factories exist because they facilitate economies of scale and mass production. If it were the same dollar for dollar, they'd have the same 30 or 40 people in there handstitching everything on stools.

    Factories work well based on the foreman and their organization, it is their job as a manager to architect the work flow and the steps needed to create a piece amongst the various stations. Foremen even cut the stacks on their own, by stacking up 50 squares of fabric at a time, cutting them with a bandsaw, tying them off with a piece of scrap, and then throwing them to the first station whereby it snakes around the room until there's 50 finished pieces at the end of the line. Nobody in there is trying anything more on the clothing than they're supposed to, but that's all out of a foreman's head, so the results can be okay, the results can be magical, but likely just average. It's not rocket science, it's just experience to create a workflow.

    Anyway, stitching doesn't really matter, apart from being clean and straight - anybody with decent muscle memory and some time behind a machine can sew a straight line, and that's all that is needed if you're working in a factory. The foreman will decide which seams take stress, and which ones fell and double over the rest of the material inward to keep the interior clean and prevent pulling as you wear the garment, or serve as decoration. That is half and half, really. The reason 'handmade' shirts are half machine, half handwork is that it just functions better to have clean machine made sides and collars, but soft handsewn arm scyes and shoulders, and strong handsewn buttons and buttonholes.

    Complications, details, and functions of a pattern do not cost more, and do not represent quality. That is creativity. A factory will not charge much more for more steps, it's never precluded high fashion pieces from being made, just because of the cost, because we're talking $5 a piece or something. A piece can be simple, a piece can be complex, the price is not affected. It's up to the designer to choose how many complications they expect from their designs, and obviously more is not better.

    Tailors with a custom job only have their time and money as a constraint, so they are likely to give you a better finished result. To see something from start to finish, they can mentally keep track of the idiosyncrasies of a piece, and care about the final outcome, which factory people in all the stages between foreman and final station don't, really.
     
    4 people like this.
  19. bows1

    bows1 Senior member

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    MGM Grand. And yes I would smash as long as I didn't have to talk to them haha. Little time for that however, working all week; we'll see how it goes.


    Yeah for sure, the girls wear the smallest tights thing they can, while the dudes wear the exact uniform you described. No Hooker cards yet, working in the hotel all day . Did see a couple Pro's at dinner last night. 2 of them, for 4 dudes. Rough night for them.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2011
  20. macuser3of5

    macuser3of5 Senior member

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    stayed at the mgm grand too; the sushi restaurant near the entrance is pretty damn good. ate way too many caterpillar rolls.
     
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