Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope)

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by LA Guy, May 15, 2015.

  1. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    This already happens, even for reasonable well paid workers. In LA, the average commute is over 45 minutes. I knew low wage workers who commuted 1.5-2 hours by bus to get to work. And it's been that way for decades. A study showed that a lot of people actually valued their (car) commutes, since it was the time they had to themselves. In the little town where I live now, I get mad if we can't park right in front of the place that I am trying to get. In San Francisco, you are lucky to get parking a few blocks away. I know fair bunch of people who want to have a house, and live in the Bay Area, but are cops, teachers, etc, so they have 1 h+ commutes on the train.

    Human beings are incredibly adaptable, and get used to inconvenience, or conversely, ease, very quickly. As long as the infrastructure doesn't break down catastrophically (say, by way of zombie apocalypse), we'll probably just keep on trucking along.
     


  2. stevent

    stevent Senior member

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    Or people just work ridiculous hours
    http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_26047884/overtime-costs-at-bay-area-governments-soar-since

    Though in SF I'd never drive, Bart or Caltrain to bus is much more convenient as well as Uber. Use Uber more than I drive in LA these days as well for peace of mind
     


  3. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    Feels like you're conflating two separate views. On the one hand, you're talking about what people should expect if they make certain life decisions. Study English Literature -> expect to live in the boondocks. On the other hand, it feels like you're making general statements about how cities should plan, which is separate matter.

    You can be a single agent reacting to circumstances -- and it's true, if you don't have highly-sought-after skills, you will have to adapt in many ways to economic pressure (including not being able to live in certain communities, or being pushed out of your long-held community). But this seems like a separate issue from whether cities should make policy to preserve economic diversity within its borders. That's not a novel concept, and lots of communities have done it (including San Francisco, up until very, very recently).

    In the Bay Area, some of this could be solved by just letting developers build up (meaning higher buildings), so that you get more homes. But that's a political fight because a lot of middle-class San Franciscans value their "small-town" city feel. Nobody wants skyscrapers in their backyard.

    Economic and social outcomes aren't natural; they're a result of rules and polices. That's true even if you take a very free market, laissez faire view of things (e.g. nonregulation requires its own set of regulations). If you value economic diversity in a community -- or at least don't think it's right that huge sections of people are getting pushed out of their homes -- it's not like it's impossible to set policies against those things.

    Anyway, this is veering on CE discussion that should probably be taken elsewhere.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2015


  4. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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    Kids should presented a lot of options, so they get to know what is out there, I ended up in a field that I didn't know existed while at school, which is a problem, as it will result in a lack of certain professions. (Real Estate development, yes I am the devil). I did that exact thing with my 15 y.o. niece, who ended going from wanting to be a vet to wanting to work in politics, as it suits her skills and personality better.

    You hit the your head on the nail here, people believing anyone and everyone has the right to live 2 min walk from the city center in any mayor city, is the root of a lot of problems. We have a shortage of student housing at the moment, which mainly due to the fact the students don't want to commute more than 10 minutes on bike, so even if we build student housing on the outskirts of the city they don't want to live there, as they can't crawl home from the bar.






    It's because you don't have any laws put in place to avoid this and it's actually pretty easy to solve. The easiest solution is to out in a requirement of residency for all home owners, so someone has to live there and not let the place sit empty. This will drive prices down to an affordable level and make the housing market an owner occupiers market.





    The government here mark all development sites for a certain use, so developers can't just build what they want and around 20% of new development sites are social housing, as a way to keep "normal people" inside the city limits and keep from creating ghettos and keeping areas diverse.

    The main problem is like everywhere else is that building sites are insanely expensive in desirable areas, so it's not possible nowadays to build affordable housing within a certain limit of most city centers, so they have to commute. An attractive building site may cost $200 a sq.ft. of building right or more, which contributes to making the homes unaffordable for low income workers and the councils condone this as they are often the sellers of the sites.
     


  5. Spehsmonkey

    Spehsmonkey Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2015


  6. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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    TBH: it's not as if I think that people an entitled to having 5 minute commutes, but I do think that a place where people doing essential jobs for the city to function at all can't live in the city is insane.

    Yes, people adapt, and yes other people have unrealistic expectations (which goes both ways: employers assuming a 1-2 hour commute is just peachy aren't doing anyone any favours), but between all of this is what, to me, makes most sense: if the people keeping the place running can't live there reasonably, then something should change.

    In Australia post code is the single biggest indicator of a child's future success (measured in a bunch of different ways) - this is largely because poorer parts of the wider community end up in developing and poorly resourced areas with teachers, social services who (generally) aren't as good and can't leverage their better skills to get work in more desirable locations and these issues conflate and multiply and suddenly we have swathes of failure and a real limited ability to overcome these issues.

    Couple with that the inner-suburbs more intelligent and powerful community voice that, generally, gets more of what it wants and welcome to Australia.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2015


  7. msg

    msg Senior member

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  8. ManofKent

    ManofKent Senior member

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  9. Ken P

    Ken P Senior member

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    Wow, I just remembered I have a pair of those too. Meant to wear them this summer... whoops.
     


  10. notwithit

    notwithit Pullup laureate

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    I just accept the offer, wait for payment so I can get his shipping address, refund the payment, and send him an envelope of glitter: www.sendyourenemiesglitter.com/



    I'd never even considered this when I started buying a place that's tenant-occupied. On the plus side, I remembered to request a walkthrough the day before settlement, so at least I'll know whether he's still there before I try to move in.



    Kinda makes sense since they no longer occupied a niche in the marketplace after a certain point.

    Noshill, but WvG sells overdye oxfords cut slimmer than BoO for $74 a pop.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2015


  11. nahneun

    nahneun Uncle Nephew

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    send glitter AND a potato
     


  12. Fuuma

    Fuuma Franchouillard Modasse

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    Make restrictions on owning apartments you don't inhabit, real estate isn't a market, it is places for people to live, just make it a less attractive market and it will come back to its proper use. People can speculate on google or some other useless shit.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2015


  13. habitant

    habitant Senior member

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    No and not going to happen. More demand will keep driving prices up.
     


  14. Fuuma

    Fuuma Franchouillard Modasse

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    Some countries do it and it works, wtf are you talking about? Hell FindFinn and I don't really see eye to eye on politics but he'll +1 that easily. To use an absurd example if I added a 100% sales tax on real estate sales it would def drive demand/prices down. It is not going to happen in the sense that we are more and more into an atomized and defeated society that assumes current late capitalism truly is the end of history.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2015


  15. Baron

    Baron Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I own multifamily housing. I don't see it as speculation as much as a business, like any other. I work almost entirely at the low end of the market and, frankly, most of my tenants don't have the resources or skills to own a home. Somebody needs to build and maintain these properties, nobody will do it well unless it's profitable to do so. I'm not sure what the alternative is to restricted private ownership of housing - government housing? Has that worked well anywhere?
     


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