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Random Fashion Thoughts (Part 3: Style farmer strikes back) - our general discussion thread

jeremyschroeder

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If you want Japanese, there are definitely options out there. Naked and Famous usually has some interesting washes in lighter-weight denims. Their stuff is usually quite stiff to begin with but the two pair I've had broke in really quickly. If you can make their fit work (they run small in my experience), Orslow is another good option and I know they have an undyed or natural color denim in their Ivy fit.
I’ll check out more Naked and Famous. The orSlow ivy fit is too tight (I’m looking for straight leg, looser fit), though they do have a really nice look.
 

Reginald Bartholomew

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I’ll check out more Naked and Famous. The orSlow ivy fit is too tight (I’m looking for straight leg, looser fit), though they do have a really nice look.

Absolutely try these on in person (and if you can't buy from a seller that measures each pair, like Blue Owl or something). It's not just that they run small, it's that pairs of the same fit, fabric, and size can vary wildly at the waist, rise, hem, thighs etc. Great jeans for the price, but measurement roulette is part of the experience. True Guy fit is a great straight leg.
 

Shryke

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I've just come back from a few days in Antwerp. I went to see the local sample sales and drink good beer.

While I was there I went to some of the flagship stores, namely Ann Demeulemeester and Dries Van Noten.

I also went to the fashion museum, which was OK, not great. However, they did show a really nice little documentary about the Antwerp 6, and it demonstrated how they had this kind of mega creative, youthful kind of punk ethos and energy (of course, in different ways for each designer, but in a general sense, it's true.)

Anyway, it got me thinking about how ******* sad it is that the clothes from these brands are pretty much unobtainable now unless you're making seriously, seriously good money. I earn decent enough money, my living costs aren't too bad, but there's just no way in hell that I can justify spending £250 on a thin t shirt. It just makes me feel really pissed off that these brands show all this kind of... youthful, punk, rock and roll energy energy in their campaigns and on social media, but the reality is that the people who can afford this **** are the mega successful, not the poets and musicians and painters who probably should be wearing these clothes.

I dunno, I know I'm rambling, and I know I'm making a fairly obvious point, but man is it all so ridiculously broken. For reference... Ann Demeulemeester sample sale, €280 for a fairly boring, not particularly well constructed, beige waistcoat. In a sample sale! Like... come on, are you serious?!

Only thing I bought was a very nice, basic, ribbed grey longsleeved t-shirt from Howlin', made in Belgium, €30.
 

Keyser_Söze

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I've just come back from a few days in Antwerp. I went to see the local sample sales and drink good beer.

While I was there I went to some of the flagship stores, namely Ann Demeulemeester and Dries Van Noten.

I also went to the fashion museum, which was OK, not great. However, they did show a really nice little documentary about the Antwerp 6, and it demonstrated how they had this kind of mega creative, youthful kind of punk ethos and energy (of course, in different ways for each designer, but in a general sense, it's true.)

Anyway, it got me thinking about how ******* sad it is that the clothes from these brands are pretty much unobtainable now unless you're making seriously, seriously good money. I earn decent enough money, my living costs aren't too bad, but there's just no way in hell that I can justify spending £250 on a thin t shirt. It just makes me feel really pissed off that these brands show all this kind of... youthful, punk, rock and roll energy energy in their campaigns and on social media, but the reality is that the people who can afford this **** are the mega successful, not the poets and musicians and painters who probably should be wearing these clothes.

I dunno, I know I'm rambling, and I know I'm making a fairly obvious point, but man is it all so ridiculously broken. For reference... Ann Demeulemeester sample sale, €280 for a fairly boring, not particularly well constructed, beige waistcoat. In a sample sale! Like... come on, are you serious?!

Only thing I bought was a very nice, basic, ribbed grey longsleeved t-shirt from Howlin', made in Belgium, €30.
I was always under the impression that the people you're describing as unable to afford the clothes are the ones these brands are just copying anyway for the masses to jump on the train.
 

Shryke

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I was always under the impression that the people you're describing as unable to afford the clothes are the ones these brands are just copying anyway for the masses to jump on the train.
Yeah, that's probably always been the case.

I think the difference is that in the past, 'high-end' clothes were somewhat more affordable. So I guess maybe if you were DIYing your own clothes to some extent, and your subculture was being 'borrowed from' by a designer, then at least if you respected the work of that designer, you could save up a bit of cash and buy something good quality, designed by someone with genuine respect for and understanding of your subculture.

So maybe you could get a really well made jacket that worked for your style because it was designed by someone with talent who looked at your subculture's style, took an item commonly worn in that subculture, and did something cool to elevate it further. And the fabrics and construction were good. And you could think 'hey, that designer understands what we're going for here, and they've made something that speaks to me and that I want to buy', and perhaps you could buy it for a 'reasonable' price.

I feel like that kind of circular respect is dead now because the cost of clothes from these brands is just so ludicrously high. You mention 'the masses' jumping on the train (buying the expensive stuff), but again, is it the masses? Or is it some tiny tiny portion of society. I'm 35 years old, I live in London, and I know plenty of people who are at least 'interested' in having decent clothes, and I don't know a single person who's spending £250 on a t-shirt.
 

Keyser_Söze

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Yeah, that's probably always been the case.

I think the difference is that in the past, 'high-end' clothes were somewhat more affordable. So I guess maybe if you were DIYing your own clothes to some extent, and your subculture was being 'borrowed from' by a designer, then at least if you respected the work of that designer, you could save up a bit of cash and buy something good quality, designed by someone with genuine respect for and understanding of your subculture.

So maybe you could get a really well made jacket that worked for your style because it was designed by someone with talent who looked at your subculture's style, took an item commonly worn in that subculture, and did something cool to elevate it further. And the fabrics and construction were good. And you could think 'hey, that designer understands what we're going for here, and they've made something that speaks to me and that I want to buy', and perhaps you could buy it for a 'reasonable' price.

I feel like that kind of circular respect is dead now because the cost of clothes from these brands is just so ludicrously high. You mention 'the masses' jumping on the train (buying the expensive stuff), but again, is it the masses? Or is it some tiny tiny portion of society. I'm 35 years old, I live in London, and I know plenty of people who are at least 'interested' in having decent clothes, and I don't know a single person who's spending £250 on a t-shirt.
Good example is the 90's when designers took grunge fashion and made it for the masses.
 

LA Guy

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Yeah, that's probably always been the case.

I think the difference is that in the past, 'high-end' clothes were somewhat more affordable. So I guess maybe if you were DIYing your own clothes to some extent, and your subculture was being 'borrowed from' by a designer, then at least if you respected the work of that designer, you could save up a bit of cash and buy something good quality, designed by someone with genuine respect for and understanding of your subculture.

So maybe you could get a really well made jacket that worked for your style because it was designed by someone with talent who looked at your subculture's style, took an item commonly worn in that subculture, and did something cool to elevate it further. And the fabrics and construction were good. And you could think 'hey, that designer understands what we're going for here, and they've made something that speaks to me and that I want to buy', and perhaps you could buy it for a 'reasonable' price.

I feel like that kind of circular respect is dead now because the cost of clothes from these brands is just so ludicrously high. You mention 'the masses' jumping on the train (buying the expensive stuff), but again, is it the masses? Or is it some tiny tiny portion of society. I'm 35 years old, I live in London, and I know plenty of people who are at least 'interested' in having decent clothes, and I don't know a single person who's spending £250 on a t-shirt.
I suppose it depends on what you by “masses”. The aspirational fashion consumer typically comes from the top quintile of HHI. Definitely higher income than most, but also hardly that tiny, tiny minority. They are just people who prioritize clothing and make you the difference elsewhere. The real luxury sector is actively targeting the actually rich top 0.1%, and those goods are actually beyond the stretched budget of someone merely upper middle class.
 

Coldsnap

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I'm in Japan shopping my heart out with the low Yen. Everyone in the stores have been amazingly nice. I think it's funny though that they give me a once over look when I'm in the store. Like I'm not going to be living out of a suitcase and do 30k steps a day in 21oz denim and a Kapital Ring Coat and Aldens :-D
 

LA Guy

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I'm in Japan shopping my heart out with the low Yen. Everyone in the stores have been amazingly nice. I think it's funny though that they give me a once over look when I'm in the store. Like I'm not going to be living out of a suitcase and do 30k steps a day in 21oz denim and a Kapital Ring Coat and Aldens :-D
What are you wearing? I hear this a lot. A lot of Americans on vacation treat it like it’s an Olympic sport of doing the most things. I mean, good on you if you want to do that, but it sounds exhausting. Maybe I’m just old and tired.
 

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