** Quintessential Crockett & Jones Thread ** (reviews, quality, etc...)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by david3558, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. Quantimil

    Quantimil Well-Known Member

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    I have a bit of problem shape in my heels (narrow and angular) and shoes where the heel counter doesn't adjust at all get painful with a lot of wear in a single day. Edward Green uses leather heel stiffeners, (plastic in the toe anyway) and my Dovers are the most comfortable shoes I have at the moment because I broke them in to the shape of my feet.

    The stiffness of the sole contributes to slipping a lot. When it softens up with wear, there should be no slippage left. Oak bark soles, as in the Handgrades, tend to take a lot more wear for them to soften up, but they also last a lot longer.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  2. riesenschnauser

    riesenschnauser Member

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    I have the exact same experience. Of the C&J shoes I have owned or tried on, most all of them suffer from a low and wide heel area which increases heel slippage. My best-fitting C&J are my Connaughts (236 last), but after 3 years of hard wear they still have som heel slippage in them, countered only by the supreme fit over the forefoot. Carmina Simpson has the same issue. Heel-fit-wise, my Loake Aldwychs are much better by comparison, comparable to my EG Dovers.
     
  3. soender

    soender Well-Known Member

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    Have the same problems with heel slippage.
    I found, in a recent visit to C&J Jermyn Street, that the Connought's fit with a thin inlay (I bought them), 325 fit okay with no inlay, and the 341 fit perfect ootb without the heel movement when walking.

    How those last's translate into boot lasts I don't know. Perhaps someone can step in? Cus' you know.. winter is coming.
     
  4. Tuur

    Tuur Well-Known Member

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    I've been reading a lot of older post and topics the last few days and I'm surprised to read how many people are not really comfortable in their (in most cases) (very) expensive shoes. I even read a blogpost of the shoe snob in which he says that most of his shoes are not really comfortable all day (the reason for this are his weird shaped feet, he says) . And he is an expert in fit (i presume).

    Maybe I have to praise myself lucky that my Edgware's are relatively comfortable all things considered, apart from the heel slippage.

    @ Quantimil: maybe I should try Edward Green. But they are so damn expensive.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2013
  5. JubeiSpiegel

    JubeiSpiegel Senior member

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    Some would say not to expect a bespoke glove fit on a RTW shoe.

    I will admit that based on the width of my feet, it is not uncommon to have a slight heel slip on shoes. It is definitely almost non exsistant on my GGs though. They also do a great job on fit for a RTW shoe...
     
  6. riesenschnauser

    riesenschnauser Member

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    Classical leather shoes will never be as comfortable as, say, Nike Air runners. There aren't any natural materials that can give that level of cushioning. Moreover, the uppers of sneakers and runners are often padded which creates the illusion of a good fit, while in reality you're sticking your foot into a generically-shaped cushion. Classical shoes by contrast offer little or no padding as they are supposed to closely match the shape of the foot. The fact that almost everyone relies upon runners as their daily shoes of course means that feasibility of offering classical shoes in different lasts and widths remains low even in larger cities. I believe that most people would be able to achieve a good fit given enough variety in widths and sizes (Church's famously used to offer RTW shoes in 7 widths), but this is not economically viable in today's market. That said, buying well-fitting shoes takes some experience, as with almost everything else. The first time you buy a suit, you are less likely to get a proper fit compared to when you get your fifth suit, and so on. Further to this point, shoe fit is very much a question of personal taste; some people prefer their shoes on the loose side, whereas I like them to be quite snug. Thus, my first two pairs of good shoes are slightly too roomy.
     
  7. wurger

    wurger Senior member

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    well said, mate.
     
  8. Aidan K

    Aidan K Senior member

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    Can anyone identify these C&J shoes (or if they are even genuine C&J)??

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  9. NAMOR

    NAMOR Senior member

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  10. Aidan K

    Aidan K Senior member

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  11. Quantimil

    Quantimil Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Aug 3, 2013
  12. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

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    This is a pair of Crockett & Jones Audleys that I returned to the factory in Northampton for refurbishment.

    The first photo shows the neglected state they were in. The heels were worn right down at the back, and the soles had been worn all the way through to the cork.

    The other photos show the shoes after they came back. So what had C&J done?

    1. Replaced the cork, welt, soles and heels on the original last. The soles and heels look magnificent - i'm reluctant to walk around in them now!

    2. New insoles

    4. New laces.

    5. Thorough clean, with the patina looking really nice.

    The total cost was $250, including shipping from Australia to the UK and back. If you consider that a quality shoe repairer here in Melbourne would probably charge $100 for a full set of soles and heels, this looks like pretty good value. I wouldn't do this for any old shoe, but would certainly consider the exercise for another high-end pair of shoes. in future.


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  13. Fiddler

    Fiddler Senior member

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    Looks like rubbish.
     
  14. Aidan K

    Aidan K Senior member

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    Indeed.

    A thread over at AAAC from 2005 suggests C&J licensed its name to a South African company in the 70s to raise money, which is where this line comes from. Thanks for the tip about SA!
     
  15. meister

    meister Senior member

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    There were a whole lot of licensed C&J shoes made in New Zealand and sold in Australia. I have a few pairs. They date from the 1970s from memory.
     

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