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Question regarding style of overcoat

Nobilis Animus

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double00

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OP has a fabric so that's probably the place to start. a polo coat begins and ends with camel or at least a softer plushier drape than most military-style fabrics. i'm not quite sure how that wool H&S would compare (op says it's lamb but ?) but i wouldn't count on getting a *polo coat* from a fabric that isn't frankly more on the robe-y side

maybe OP has a shoulder style pref to go with the db idea. i like a raglan sleeve for comfort plus it reads way more civvy
 

Andy57

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I've never owned anything with peaked lapels, partially because they're slightly ostentatious for non-eveningwear and also because the peaks seem to droop and bend.
I guess I'd have to ask what kind of jackets you're wearing where the peaked lapels "droop and bend"? I've never seen or experienced such a thing.
Keep in mind the practicality of wearing a longer overcoat. If they go below the knees, they tend to get caught in things, get dirty, drag on the ground, and wear out faster, for really not much added warmth.
This is just about complete nonsense.

An overcoat should come well below the knees, several inches at least. Otherwise, what's the point?
DB overcoats aren't typical, so I guess it's relative. I consider peaked lapels slightly ostentatious on anything other than a tuxedo jacket. Components of ultra-formal attire on less formal attire is always going to be slightly ostentatious. Doesn't mean it's bad.
Also, just about complete nonsense. Double-breasted overcoats are at least as common as single-breasted. Furthermore, every double-breasted suit that isn't a shawl-lapel dinner jacket has peaked lapels. Nothing ostentatious about that, although I suppose it is a matter of personal taste and opinion.
 

rjc149

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I guess I'd have to ask what kind of jackets you're wearing where the peaked lapels "droop and bend"? I've never seen or experienced such a thing.

This is just about complete nonsense.

An overcoat should come well below the knees, several inches at least. Otherwise, what's the point?

Also, just about complete nonsense. Double-breasted overcoats are at least as common as single-breasted. Furthermore, every double-breasted suit that isn't a shawl-lapel dinner jacket has peaked lapels. Nothing ostentatious about that, although I suppose it is a matter of personal taste and opinion.
“Complete nonsense” because you are able to provide irrefutable evidence that what I’ve stated lacks logical cogency or has no objective basis in truth? Or because you don’t share the same experience and opinion?

Would it be “complete nonsense” to a man living in Canada to hear a man who lives in Arizona to say “it rarely ever snows?”

Overcoats that fall below the knees do not, in my personal experience, add much more warmth over ones that fall at or just above the knees. The extra 5 inches of coat do, however, in my experience make them a little more cumbersome. Which looks better is a matter of preference.

As someone who loves to wear his DB topcoat over a suit in winter, I can speak to my personal experience out and about in NYC that I rarely see men wearing nice, properly fitted DB topcoats. In cold weather I see more SB coats, bubble down jackets and Canada Goose parkas than anything. I’m usually one of the very few in a DB coat. Which makes me proud to wear it.

Without attempting to dismiss each other’s opinions as factually bankrupt by calling it “nonsense” I will also assert that double-breasted suits with peaked lapels are quite ostentatious in a modern professional setting, but can be pulled off by the right type of person in the right type of position. For instance, if you’re the president of Scientology.

No, I don’t believe peaked lapels belong on anything outside of evening wear. Maybe I don’t have the clout or confidence to pull it off. I don’t like little horns sticking up over my shoulders. Of course I realize there are more understated iterations of the peaked lapel, but I’ll stick to notched lapels. That’s a personal opinion with which you are welcome to disagree.
 
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Nobilis Animus

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I don’t like little horns sticking up over my shoulders.
Perhaps this is part of the issue. Not all peaked lapels have to go up so high, and they can be set at different angles - even horizontal.
 

rjc149

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Perhaps this is part of the issue. Not all peaked lapels have to go up so high, and they can be set at different angles - even horizontal.
The horizontal iteration where both peaks are flush with each other would look quite nice on a topcoat, but I believed that peaked lapels describe the bottom peak extending, at an outward angle, past the top peak.

If so then I’m ready to concede my definition of “peaked lapel” may be too narrow for this discussion.
 

breakaway01

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Easy now buddy, I never said it was 'not good,' nor did I advocate against DB topcoats.
I dunno, thought your statement was a pretty weak endorsement of DB topcoats.
rjc149 said:
When I see a DB coat, it's almost always on some kid wearing something he found in grandpa's closet or a hipster wearing a military surplus coat.
 

rjc149

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I dunno, thought your statement was a pretty weak endorsement of DB topcoats.
I enthusiastically endorse the ownership and wearing of bespoke double-breasted topcoats! I wholeheartedly support the OP's commissioning of one, as I did the same. And I love mine. It's warm, stylish, and timelessly sophisticated. I wear it with and without suits. I wish I saw more of them.
 

FlyingHorker

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I guess I'd have to ask what kind of jackets you're wearing where the peaked lapels "droop and bend"? I've never seen or experienced such a thing.

This is just about complete nonsense.

An overcoat should come well below the knees, several inches at least. Otherwise, what's the point?
I use the term overcoat fairly loosely, but it depends on your need for warmth, commute, whether you get into cars frequently, how many coats you plan on owning, etc.

I had an overcoat made for me that reached the bottom of my calf. It was a pain to store, anywhere I went. Even sitting down the hem dragged along the ground.

I had it shortened to my upper calf, and I no longer have to worry as much about getting the hem dirty, and my legs stay plenty warm. It also still maintained it's silhouette, despite being 6 inches shorter (heh). Still tough to store though.

I've another coat that is above my knee. I like that length a lot too, because there is 0 care or worry about dirty hems or folding the coat up on a chair. It's not as warm, but that's fine, it's lighter weight for late fall and early winter. Not much 'drama' in its silhouette though.

The 3rd coat I own is middle-of-the-knee, and is the best overall compromise between all of the above factors IMO.
 

Andy57

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“Complete nonsense” because you are able to provide irrefutable evidence that what I’ve stated lacks logical cogency or has no objective basis in truth? Or because you don’t share the same experience and opinion?

Would it be “complete nonsense” to a man living in Canada to hear a man who lives in Arizona to say “it rarely ever snows?”

Overcoats that fall below the knees do not, in my personal experience, add much more warmth over ones that fall at or just above the knees. The extra 5 inches of coat do, however, in my experience make them a little more cumbersome. Which looks better is a matter of preference.

[...]

Without attempting to dismiss each other’s opinions as factually bankrupt by calling it “nonsense” I will also assert that double-breasted suits with peaked lapels are quite ostentatious in a modern professional setting, but can be pulled off by the right type of person in the right type of position. For instance, if you’re the president of Scientology.

No, I don’t believe peaked lapels belong on anything outside of evening wear. Maybe I don’t have the clout or confidence to pull it off. I don’t like little horns sticking up over my shoulders. Of course I realize there are more understated iterations of the peaked lapel, but I’ll stick to notched lapels. That’s a personal opinion with which you are welcome to disagree.
You are, of course, entirely entitled to your opinions, which is all your assertions of fact are. As are mine. But you did present your opinions of overcoat length and some other statements about double-breasted lapels and jackets as some sort of statements of general truths. So I was wrong when I called those statements almost complete nonsense. There was no need to use the word almost.

I don't know how you wear or wore your long overcoats to get them dirty or to have them drag on the ground. Do you have the same problems with the bottoms of your trousers, too? I'm sorry if that's the case. All I can say is that I have never had any such problem. Neither do my long overcoats represent an intractable problem of storage in restaurants or elsewhere. I've simply never had that problem. Now, that's just my experience over decades of wearing overcoats and does not negate your experience in any way. But it does mean that your assertion that longer coats get dirty and drag on the ground is not true for everyone.
 

rjc149

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You are, of course, entirely entitled to your opinions, which is all your assertions of fact are. As are mine. But you did present your opinions of overcoat length and some other statements about double-breasted lapels and jackets as some sort of statements of general truths. So I was wrong when I called those statements almost complete nonsense. There was no need to use the word almost.

I don't know how you wear or wore your long overcoats to get them dirty or to have them drag on the ground. Do you have the same problems with the bottoms of your trousers, too? I'm sorry if that's the case. All I can say is that I have never had any such problem. Neither do my long overcoats represent an intractable problem of storage in restaurants or elsewhere. I've simply never had that problem. Now, that's just my experience over decades of wearing overcoats and does not negate your experience in any way. But it does mean that your assertion that longer coats get dirty and drag on the ground is not true for everyone.
I have little to no patience in providing the caveat "in my opinion" on everything I post on an opinion forum, in order to spare the likes you your indignation and abraded feelings.

Maybe you didn't care to consider the particulars of what I said regarding long overcoats dragging all over the ground, in your ire to fire off a retort as quickly and forcefully as possible. Which is okay, I can repeat myself.

I owned a Calvin Klein overcoat that came down to about mid-calf, it was my first overcoat. As someone who stands at 5'10, it wasn't a large, cumbersome garment, but I came to experience a few things. When hanging from a chair (you see, a plebian boor such as myself often frequents establishments that do not accommodate overcoats), much of the garment would be resting on the floor. Yes, it would then simply be folded over the chair back, disallowing me to comfortably recline. Specks of salty and dirty slush would appear on the bottom hem. On more than a few occasions I closed a car door on it. When riding the subway, God knows what filth and fluid residue it swept off the seats.

So that may not be your experience with overcoats. It was enough of an experience that my second and third overcoats were of a more "modern" length (or "car coats) which I found to be more practical, and, as a bonus, more flattering of my average height. I noted absolutely no reduction in warmth or comfort.

I shared my thoughts with the OP who is 5'7 and made some suggestions based on personal experience. I presented nothing as fact or empirical truth. I appreciate the lively and entertaining discussion, but I didn't violate any boundaries here.
 

Andy57

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I have little to no patience in providing the caveat "in my opinion" on everything I post on an opinion forum, in order to spare the likes you your indignation and abraded feelings.

Maybe you didn't care to consider the particulars of what I said regarding long overcoats dragging all over the ground, in your ire to fire off a retort as quickly and forcefully as possible. Which is okay, I can repeat myself.

I owned a Calvin Klein overcoat that came down to about mid-calf, it was my first overcoat. As someone who stands at 5'10, it wasn't a large, cumbersome garment, but I came to experience a few things. When hanging from a chair (you see, a plebian boor such as myself often frequents establishments that do not accommodate overcoats), much of the garment would be resting on the floor. Yes, it would then simply be folded over the chair back, disallowing me to comfortably recline. Specks of salty and dirty slush would appear on the bottom hem. On more than a few occasions I closed a car door on it. When riding the subway, God knows what filth and fluid residue it swept off the seats.
Understood. I appreciate the explanation.
 

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