Purely social events

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Parterre, Mar 8, 2012.

  1. Parterre

    Parterre Well-Known Member

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    Time to time I will read the New York Social Diary to catch up on what everybody is doing. On my most recent visit, something occured to me- just about every event seemed to be some kind of benefit or award ceremony. Thus my question: whatever happened to the purely social event- held for personal reasons, a holiday, or "just because"?

    When the Vanderbilts snubbed the Astors, it wasn't over a cancer charity. Why the change?
     


  2. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Because if you aren't doing it for a charity (and honestly a lot of these things spend as much or more on the event than they end up actually sending to the charity), you will get a bunch of 99%er protestors staking out your red carpet
     


  3. Parterre

    Parterre Well-Known Member

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    My question still stands.
     


  4. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    Why would the media want to cover/photograph/blog random parties? They no doubt happen but I can promise you it's not being reported on. Also, like OTC suggested, people feel better about dressing up for charity events/awards/etc (aka a purpose) and not random events.
     


  5. 12345Michael54321

    12345Michael54321 Senior member

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    Such essentially social events still occur (just as fundraisers occurred back in the day), but a fundraiser for, say, cancer research might involve 600 guests (some of them celebrities, of various status), in a public venue, with P.R. people representing both the cause and the celebrities actively courting media attention.

    Whereas a modern day Astor or Vanderbilt, inviting some friends/acquaintances/associates over to his duplex at Park and 53rd, for a dinner party, is something entirely different. It's a private setting, involving few people, quite likely none of them pop stars, professional athletes, or other celebrities of a particularly trendy sort. There are no P.R. people working the event. And, indeed, in certain circles a host with a reputation for courting attention for such get togethers may well acquire a negative reputation amongst his potential guests, since publicity and the public spotlight is decidedly not something his guests value, as a general rule. Courting media attention is regarded by many as vulgar. Certainly, exceptions may sometimes be made for a worthy cause, but not for a private dinner party.

    I hope this helps explain why you may hear lots about the former sort of event, but relatively little about the latter sort of event.
     


  6. Parterre

    Parterre Well-Known Member

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    Thank you- in hindsight that seems obvious.
     


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