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puckering on seams

matadorpoeta

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i have two shirts with noticeable puckering on the side seams. one is a quality twill with double-needle stitching. the other is a very cheap broadcloth with single-needle stitching. so is this being caused by inferior cloth, inferior workmanship, or both?
 

NoVaguy

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i'm pretty sure Kabbaz did a post, with pictures, either here or AA showing this. but i can't find it. it showed puckering in both. perhaps there's an explanation as to why....
 

amirrorcrackd

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It is caused by the fabric shrinking and the stitching not, i believe. So I would imagine that the amount of puckering would be dependent upon the number, type, and quality of the stitches, as well as the amount of shrinkage the fabric has.

Dan
 

uriahheep

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Though they go through various finishing processes, of which mercerization/sanforization are common, fabrics can still shrink.  The "dimensional stability" of most quality cotton-based fabrics is minimal, no more than 2-3%.
Linen is a different story as most linen fabrics are not mercerized/sanforized.  Mercerized linen is extremely rare, but it's out there.
Thread undergoes various treatments to prevent shrinkage of any significance.
Washing and ironing fabric prior to cutting can help to minimize puckering.  The shirtmaker should also consider which needle to use, the thread type, the thread tension, how many stitches per inch etc on a case by case basis according to the fabric being used.
Some shirtmakers even wash interlining before cutting.
Double-needle seams are generally much wider than single-needle seams, and sewn with fewer stitches per inch.  You could say that the fabric which is packed into a double-needle seam has more room to shift around than the fabric packed into a single-needle seam.
 

uriahheep

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Improper laundering can also contribute to puckering. Wash cold or warm on delicate. Put laundry detergent in the machine and start the cycle, allowing the soap to dissolve before adding the shirts to the mix. That way you won't have to wash at higher temperatures because the soap won't dissolve and ends up sticking to your shirts. And, of course, line-dry.
 

matadorpoeta

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Improper laundering can also contribute to puckering.  Wash cold or warm on delicate.  Put laundry detergent in the machine and start the cycle, allowing the soap to dissolve before adding the shirts to the mix.  That way you won't have to wash at higher temperatures because the soap won't dissolve and ends up sticking to your shirts.  And, of course, line-dry.
all my shirts are washed by hand in cold water, and hung to dry indoors. i only have two that have the puckering problem so that rules out my washing method.

my guess is that it has something to do with the stitches per inch. perhaps mr. kabbaz would be kind enough to say for sure.
 

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