Public Relations

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by L.R., Aug 30, 2010.

  1. L.R.

    L.R. Senior member

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    I'm just wondering if anyone has any views on this career path. As a recent grad with a social science major, I'm in the process of job hunting. Several people have recommended that I look into this career. I may have an opportunity present itself shortly, but I would like to get some knowledge on it. (Outside of wikipedia and "Is Public Relations Right for You!!???" websites).
    I understand its basic idea of telling the companies story to the public, but what else does it entail? Does it have a high transitory rate like advertising or top level marketing? (where you're only as good as your last idea). How applicable is one PR job to another? For example, if I were to work for a food company for several years, would I be limited to that area of work, or would other industries be interested in me? I'm looking at doing an MBA in several years, and was wondering if PR is a suitable background, or if it's too 'soft' and related enough to general management? As well, something that is of little concern to me but still should be asked, does anyone know the salary range for people in PR? I understand that it's extremely broad, but how does it compare to management, finance or other such things?

    Anyway, sorry for the wall of text, this just seems like a forum where someone could be in the know and offer some advice.

    Cheers and thanks


    (tl;dr version: What is PR? Is it rewarding? Can I do a MBA with it as a background? Can I make a solid living from it?)
     
  2. dragon8

    dragon8 Senior member

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    PR entails that you write press releases, hold press conferences, handle crisis management/PR. A MBA will always help in business. There is a Masters in PR.

    My friend is in PR and she loves it. But she started out as a gopher in the PR department and now works for Google
     
  3. WoodyStylee

    WoodyStylee Senior member

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    I studied PR in college, and worked in PR for about a year after college. One piece of advice i'd give you is to do PR for clients that you are truly passionate about.

    If you love sports, find a sports PR firm; fashion, find a fashion PR firm, etc.

    I did PR for both industries that I loved, and some that i hated. The job is a lot easier and much more rewarding when you actually care about the press releases your writing and what your pitching to editors.
     
  4. CMD.EXE

    CMD.EXE Senior member

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    Some of the most successful in this business are those that went from an "inside" position to PR. For example, if you were an asst. editor at vogue or NY times and now you need to do placements for a client and you left you last job on good terms you can get that done.

    Without going into specifics someone gets paid about 5-25k a mention, over 100k if its a story and they pay someone inside the publication nothing to a large portion. Welcome to media.

    In house PR people for large cos make 6 figures as well.
     
  5. L.R.

    L.R. Senior member

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    How well does one PR job transfer to another? If I work for a food company for... say 3 years, would I be able to find a role in the PR aspect of the fashion industry? I mean, fashion is what I'm aiming for, but let's be honest, I have to take what I can get starting out.
     
  6. Hombre Secreto

    Hombre Secreto Senior member

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    Read up on Edward Bernays if you haven't already.
     
  7. L.R.

    L.R. Senior member

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    Sociology major, I'm fairly informed of his work.

    But thanks for the advice, he was a master of a particular trade. Received hate and respect in great amount.
     
  8. sjd

    sjd Senior member

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    I studied PR in college, and worked in PR for about a year after college. One piece of advice i'd give you is to do PR for clients that you are truly passionate about.

    If you love sports, find a sports PR firm; fashion, find a fashion PR firm, etc.

    I did PR for both industries that I loved, and some that i hated. The job is a lot easier and much more rewarding when you actually care about the press releases your writing and what your pitching to editors.


    I agree with this. I worked in PR for a car company and loved it. Mainly because the job was challenging, always changing and I believed in the product. I was only on contract for a while and while I am now in a different part of the automotive industry, I have my sights on getting back into PR. The number one asset you can have is an attention to even the smallest detail. Number two is knowing how to spell correctly.
     
  9. Brosef

    Brosef Senior member

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    Haa social science.
     
  10. M. Bardamu

    M. Bardamu Senior member

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    The skills you'll learn working in an agency are fairly portable, but you'll also acquire a lot of specialized knowledge about an industry that may not be. Other points I'd raise:

    1.) You will likely be someone's bitch for at least the first year, meaning work late into the night, weekends, etc.

    2.) You will be laid off at least once. Agencies lose clients all the time, and they tend to lose you as well if you've been servicing that client.

    If you go client-side, it's a bit less unforgiving. But harder to get into.
     

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