Pronunciation Guide

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by jbc217, Dec 4, 2004.

  1. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    Well Dubya has enough problems pronouncing words in English...
    I was watching a speech from JFK the other day, you should see him try to pronounce "Cuba" (or "Cuber" as he termed it) Aaron
    Well accent is one thing, proper pronunciation is another... Nucular warheads anyone? Jon.
     


  2. Styleman

    Styleman In Time Out

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    (Aaron @ 06 Dec. 2004, 11:11) Quote Well Dubya has enough problems pronouncing words in English...
    I was watching a speech from JFK the other day, you should see him try to pronounce "Cuba" (or "Cuber" as he termed it) Aaron
    Well accent is one thing, proper pronunciation is another... Nucular warheads anyone? Jon.[/quote] Actually its not.
     


  3. hermes

    hermes Senior member

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    i briefly met john varvatos once
    he is a greek american from the detroit area

    he says var vay tos
    although in greek, it is var vah tos but as with many names,
    they get americanized hence the likely pronunciation
     


  4. Brian SD

    Brian SD Moderator

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    I agree. I can't believe we call Napoli "Naples."
     


  5. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    Well theres tons of that kinda stuff in Europe:

    Roma
    Wien (pronounced Veen)
    Munchen
    Firenze
    Milano
    Moskva

    the list goes on...
     


  6. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    (imageWIS @ 06 Dec. 2004, 4:20)
    Quote Well Dubya has enough problems pronouncing words in English...
    I was watching a speech from JFK the other day, you should see him try to pronounce "Cuba" (or "Cuber" as he termed it) Aaron
    Well accent is one thing, proper pronunciation is another... Nucular warheads anyone? Jon.
    Actually its not.[/quote] You misunderstand: Accent can effectively change pronunciation, but what is meant by proper pronunciation is to say words as they are spelled, thus my jab at Dubya for his use of pronouncing "˜Nuclear' as Nucular. Jon.
     


  7. Styleman

    Styleman In Time Out

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    Eh?
     


  8. matadorpoeta

    matadorpoeta Senior member

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    my point is that there is no need to change the pronunciation. and i don't see how changing the 'a' sound americanizes it either. we say "father" don't we? so it's not as though we don't have the correct sound in the english language. if the sound did not exist in english, then i could understand the necessity for changing the pronunciation of one's name.

    there is no sound in the word 'ermenegildo' that does not exist in english*, so there's no excuse to mispronounce it.

    as for names of places, these were instilled in the language long ago. we call it germany, the germans call it deutschland(?), in spanish it's called alemania.

    *the one possible exception is the 'r' sound, but if you can do a decent scottish accent, you can pronounce the 'r' as well.
     


  9. Styleman

    Styleman In Time Out

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    (hermes @ 06 Dec. 2004, 12:33) i briefly met john varvatos once he is a greek american from the detroit area he says var vay tos although in greek, it is var vah tos but as with many names, they get americanized hence the likely pronunciation
    my point is that there is no need to change the pronunciation. and i don't see how changing the 'a' sound americanizes it either. we say "father" don't we? so it's not as though we don't have the correct sound in the english language. if the sound did not exist in english, then i could understand the necessity for changing the pronunciation of one's name. *the one possible exception is the 'r' sound, but if you can do a decent scottish accent, you can pronounce the 'r' as well.
    So why can't you say; ask, past, Atlantic, Sarcastic, fast, grass, Milan, last, cast, etc.
     


  10. matadorpoeta

    matadorpoeta Senior member

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    we can. but our accent is different than yours. sometime after the pilgrims arrived someone changed the 'a' and everyone else went along with him/her.

    why do the english say "lesta" if it's spelled "leicester?"
     


  11. Andrew V.

    Andrew V. Senior member

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    I can't imagine going around the U.S. pronouncing my Dutch last name the way a Dutch speaker would and expecting others to do the same.
     


  12. Geronimo

    Geronimo Member

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  13. matadorpoeta

    matadorpoeta Senior member

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    i wouldn't expect you to say it exactly like the dutch, with dutch accent and all, but i would expect you not to change any part of the pronunciation unless it was absolutely necessary. are there any sounds in it that don't exist in english?

    what bugs me is this: if the guy's name is varvatos, i assume his ancestors pronounced it correctly. now somewhwere down the line after they get to america, somebody in his family; maybe his dad, maybe his granfather, decided that 'var-vah-tos' is too ethnic sounding or too difficult for people to pronounce, and so they start calling themselves "var-vey-tos" knowing that that they are mispronouncing their own name. in my circles, we call this being white-washed, although i'm sure there's a better term for it. (misguided assimilation?)

    this is what disgusts me. especially when there is nothing difficult about saying var-vah-tos.

    there's nothing difficult about saying KEE-tone or ee-ZYE-ah.

    if you can say armani, you can say varvatos correctly.
     


  14. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    I pronounce my surname differently from my parents, mainly because I grew up a native English speaker and understand the inflections of a native english speaker a little better than they. I doubt anyone whose native language is not tonal has a snowball's chance in hell of ever pronouncing my Cantonese name correctly.

    We chose a common language, no big deal. I have a Chinese name, and anglicized version, and an English name (as well as being called LA Guy) and feel that my life has been enriched by it.
     


  15. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    I don't think theres anything wrong with differences in pronounciation between languages, most Asian surnames are spelled in a manner that would make them distinguishable and prounouncable to Caucasians (well, at least Chinese ones, for the most part, it seems most people have alot of problems pronouncing the surname Nguyen) Therefore, my surname is pronounced totally differently in English (the anglicized spelling) than when spoken in Mandarin (the traditional spelling) Much of this is because there are very many surnames that are quite similar and if they were spelled phoenetically, caucasians wouldn't be able to distinguish them. Furthermore, in Mandarin there are many words that sound the same that have different meanings (as in English) but it's more confusing because you would have to write them differently phoenetically as the way they're distinguished is context or by different Chinese characters.
     


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