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Price of velvet compared to other clothes?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by jamesbond, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    I believe it was right around $1K, and it was on sale.

    --Andre
     
  2. stach

    stach Senior member

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    As I understand it, velvet is the result of a process (and I'm not sure that velveteen is a term of art). Cotton, rayon, linen, silk, and mohair have all been used to create fine cloth that could rightly be described as velvet.

    Mohair makes into velour.
     
  3. vc2000

    vc2000 Senior member

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    Isn't the velvet jacket trend about played out? I would be slow to put a lot of $ into a custom jacket if it were trendy. I recently saw a velvet jacket at Target.

    Please correct me if I am wrong. I don't pretend to know what the trends are.
     
  4. tiger02

    tiger02 Senior member

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    Trend? Well, I guess trends get it right sometimes then. I love to wear velvet, and doubly love the attention (and touches) it brings.

    Tom
     
  5. Dmntd

    Dmntd Member

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    Velvet not made with silk is called velveteen.

    Not the same thing

    Cotton

    Anthony
     
  6. Dmntd

    Dmntd Member

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    velveteen is a type of cloth [usually cotton] made in imitation of velvet, it has a shorter pile.

    velour is a heavy fabric that resembles velvet.

    velvet is a fabric, having a short, close nap of erect threads. it can be woven from a number of fibers including silk and cotton or a combination of fibers like silk, linen, nylon, acetate, or rayon.

    The most common silk velvet I've come across is rayon pile on a silk base, 18% silk - 82% rayon.

    Sewing silk requires small size needles and like many silk fabrics it shows pin holes. One of the hardest things about working with silk, is that it slippery, another is dull needles will pull the yarns making puckers, it really is a pain to work with, but when done right the rewards are worth the time and trouble.

    If you tape the edges to be sewn it will keep them from slipping, sew 1/4" in from the tape then cut the taped fabric off after sewing.

    Anthony
     
  7. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    I've heard that you can not press velvet, is that true? Scabal has a really nice velvet jacketing that I've been considering for nights out, but to be unable to press it would make the expenditure a little ridiculous for me.
     
  8. tiger02

    tiger02 Senior member

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    I've heard that you can not press velvet, is that true? Scabal has a really nice velvet jacketing that I've been considering for nights out, but to be unable to press it would make the expenditure a little ridiculous for me.
    Steam is your friend my man.
     
  9. mensimageconsultant

    mensimageconsultant Senior member

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    Never press velvet on the pile side. Pressing should be minimal and only to the back of the velvet after placing the fabric pile down on a needleboard or scrap piece of velvet (pile side up)

    Creasing or bruising of the pile after wearing, although infrequent, can be restored by minimal steaming to the back of the velvet. (Special care should be taken to ensure that water does not make contact with velvet qualities designated dry clean only).

    From http://www.denholme-velvets.co.uk/Care.htm
     

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