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Power tools Y'all!

Thomas

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re: miter saw, definitely. You won't regret getting one.

re: nail gun - once I picked up a Dalluge titanium hammer with nail-starter...I never even considered a nail gun again. But I'll let you know if I reconsider this when I re-side the house.

Oh, and don't ignore Milwaukee: great drills and sawzalls.
 

Artisan Fan

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I have had good luck with Makita and DeWalt in terms of power tool reliability. I prefer ShopVac over Ridgid for vacuums but most suffer from high noise and poor suction unless you go with a built-in or a Fein.
 

Milpool

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If you are setting up a workshop in a basement or garage, think about how much light you will need, then double your estimate and be prepared to buy some more beyond that.

Don't forget about a drill press.

I like to keep a set of appropriate tools for changing blades/bits and doing maintenance for each machine near that machine. I know myself and I am just more efficient that way. Usually it is just a couple of wrenches and/or allen keys per machine.

Sanders are good. I like sanders, they make life easy and happy. I like having a random orbital and a handheld belt sander. I also like a bench belt sander.

A bench grinder or two are good to have. Get some good quality stones too. That way you can maintain your tools. Sharp tools are incredibly important.
 

ClambakeSkate

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Originally Posted by Milpool
A bench grinder or two are good to have. Get some good quality stones too. That way you can maintain your tools. Sharp tools are incredibly important.

Ah yes, definitely forgot about a grinder. good call.
 

oDD_LotS

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I'm a hand tools guy, but I've got to second the recommendation for a miter saw. I use mine all the time around the house. Comes in handy when I'm coping trim or some other house-related thing. Same goes for a decent circular saw. I'm actually considering picking up a plunge-cut circular saw instead of a table saw.
 

CityConnection

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If you start doing more work you will start to accumulate more tools. Between my brother-in-law and I, we now have an enclosed trailer and most tools to do electrical, plumbing, construction, finishing, painting, and so on. Buy tools as you need them because you will eventually need them all. No need to buy them before you need them because that will free up more money to buy the stuff you need when you need them. And there are some tools that you shouldn't skimp out on and others that you can go cheap on.

my 2 cents
 

HgaleK

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Originally Posted by CityConnection
If you start doing more work you will start to accumulate more tools. Between my brother-in-law and I, we now have an enclosed trailer and most tools to do electrical, plumbing, construction, finishing, painting, and so on. Buy tools as you need them because you will eventually need them all. No need to buy them before you need them because that will free up more money to buy the stuff you need when you need them. And there are some tools that you shouldn't skimp out on and others that you can go cheap on. my 2 cents
^^^This advice here is big. Don't assemble a list of things that you might need- get it as you need them. Firstly it'll build a bit of creativity for when you have a job to do and don't have the perfect tool, and secondly it'll prevent hurried, ill informed clutter. Edit: start doing your projects before you start buying. Start with several small, fun ones, and slowly get progressively larger. You should hopefully only buy things are you encounter situations where they're necessary.
 

CityConnection

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Originally Posted by HgaleK
^^^This advice here is big. Don't assemble a list of things that you might need- get it as you need them. Firstly it'll build a bit of creativity for when you have a job to do and don't have the perfect tool, and secondly it'll prevent hurried, ill informed clutter.


Edit: start doing your projects before you start buying. Start with several small, fun ones, and slowly get progressively larger. You should hopefully only buy things are you encounter situations where they're necessary.


Agree. I didn't buy a table saw until I really needed it. But I did projects before without using it. Sure, it would have been nice to have it but instead of buying the tools I used that money to buy better materials.

Tip: good tools are great and all but great blades for those tools will make all the difference. Great blades will have that perfect clean cut without shredding the wood.
 

NorCal

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Honestly I would buy as you need . That is the best way to see what you really will use. Just don't cheap out. And used tools are not a bad idea. I've picked up a bunch of great hand tools at estate sales and the like.
A chop saw is what I want the most right now. And a big Honda generator.
 

CityConnection

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Originally Posted by NorCal
Honestly I would buy as you need . That is the best way to see what you really will use. Just don't cheap out. And used tools are not a bad idea. I've picked up a bunch of great hand tools at estate sales and the like.
A chop saw is what I want the most right now. And a big Honda generator.


I had a Honda generator that was SUPER QUIET. We could stand next to it and still have a civil conversation. When we were working we couldn't even hear it. We could run out table saw and mitre saw off it at the same time but they would both slow down. Generators are a must if you are off the grid or even as a back power supply.
 

ruben

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Originally Posted by ClambakeSkate
Anyone here do a lot of woodworking?

I'll be moving out of my apt soon, hopefully to place that's a bit bigger and would like to start buying some powertools.

I already have a drill, and plenty of hand tools, but what would you suggest for a beginner as a good starting point for other stuff?

The only thing I'm definitely going to get for sure is a Mitre Saw. I've used one extensively in the the past and it's the quickest easiest way to cut 2x4s to size for framing.


Here's a list of "either/or" I've made for my self to start:

- circular saw vs table saw? I know portability is the benefit of the circular saw, but table saw is more precise in my experience.
- jig-saw vs sawzall? Probably go jig-saw here, is there a benefit to a sawzall that I'm missing completely?

Things that I probably don't need, but want regardless:

- router. Probably a hand held model to start, but one that can eventually be mounted in a table set-up.
- power sander. What's the best way to go here if you can only get one?
- nail gun. just seems fun, but completely unnecessary for my purposes.

I'm mostly planning on making little projects/furniture/etc. but eventually would like to build things like decks/sheds/doghouse/chicken coop/etc.

Anyone have any suggestion of stuff that they use that they like? Or just general discussion re: power tools and woodworking?

p.s. Norm from 'The New Yankee Workshop' is my idol.


What sort of projects are you looking to use this stuff for?

A doghouse out of 2x4s or a dining room table?


I would certainly go with a table saw (which you'll probably get the most use out of) over the circular saw, and a jigsaw over a sawzall (which wouldn't, and shouldn;t be used for the type of stuff you're talking about).

Really a circular saw and sawsall are more construction type tools, the only thing I use a circular saw for is roughly cutting lumber to size before flattening it, and a handsaw or even a jigsaw would work just as good for that.

If money is an issue, look for a decent mid-sized router that you can use as a plunge/handheld and also drop into a router table.
 

Mr Herbert

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can anyone recomend a good book on cabinet making?

im looking at building a kitchen and wardrobes. i need a pretty detailed explanation of every step as i am an office bound.

also, in regards to table saws, are the small bench top units worthwhile?
 

pgd3

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Miter saws a great, but budget one that has enough capacity for what you're going to do.

Table saws are great, but also I'd rank as one of the more hazardous tools in a shop. And many of the cuts can be replicated by clamping a good straight board across the material and using a circular saw.

Band saw is very versatile, and with a guide and outfeed tables a largish one has lots of capacity.

Some things I find myself using all the time.

18 Brad pinner, and 23 gauge pinner. CLAMPS... lots of them.
 

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