Post Job Interview

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Mike, Mar 10, 2005.

  1. Mike

    Mike Senior member

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    Hey ladies and gentlemen. Today I had interviews at a company for a summer internship job. I interviewed with 4 different people at the company. Should I send an e-mail to the people, thanking them for giving me the chance to interview? Or would that be considered ass kissing?
     


  2. PeterMetro

    PeterMetro Senior member

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    The choice is not whether to send a letter, it's whether to send an email or a hand-written note.

    Having interviewed many people, I'd go with the email. It's really the thought that counts, they can give you some minor feedback in the form of a reply, and then they'll have your email address readily available.
     


  3. Ambulance Chaser

    Ambulance Chaser Senior member

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    When I was on the interviewing side of the desk, I found such notes to be a nice gesture.  Sadly, I only received two -- a hand-written note from a man who I already knew prior to the interview and an e-mail from a woman who attended my alma mater.  If you do decide to send a thank-you note, make sure it is not boilerplate.
     


  4. Wedge

    Wedge Member

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    Abosultely send out emails to every person that you interviewed with. Personalize each letter for the person that interviewed you and use this as a chance to fix any mistakes you might have had during the interview or a chance to follow up with questions they might have had and you weren't able to completely answer.

    Make sure to send out your thank yous right away.
     


  5. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    I would personally send a letter, it need not be handwritten, but certainly should be personalized. I would rather read something that was printed on a computer, and signed, that was obviously written with some thought involved, and not boilerplate material. I do consider this when interviewing candidates; although it's certainly not a deal-breaker if they don't, it certainly earns them points.
     


  6. topcatny

    topcatny Senior member

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    I would definintely send a thank you. As petermetro said the only question is whether it is an e-mail or handwritten note. Personally, I think the e-mail is fine. I have interviewed a lot of people over the years and I would never not hire someone because they failed to send me a thank you note. But, I remembered those who did much more than those who didn't. Also, be prompt with the e-mail but not too prompt. I always found it weird when I interviewed someone in the morning and after lunch their was already an e-mail from them thanking me for the interview. I would suggest waiting until the evening after your interview to send the e-mails, that way they will see them in the morning when they show up for work. Just my $.02.
     


  7. retronotmetro

    retronotmetro Senior member

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    I usually send letters rather than emails (sometimes you don't have everyone's email addresses) and make sure that the letter references something discussed during the interview. Two paragraphs is fine--one paragraph that is customized and the other can be generic so long as you have made the effort to customize the letter (I always close with things like "I look forward to hearing from you," and "do not hesitate to contact me if you think of anything else I can provide to you").

    I rarely get thank you notes from people I interview, and usually my appraisal form has been sent to our recruiting people before I would get something in the mail. But I do appreciate getting follow up from recruits.

    If you do have email addresses for the interviewers, email can be great though many people feel it is less formal and since it involves less effort it is arguably less showing of appreciation. I once got a thank you email from a law student within two hours of the interview--this person must have run right back to the hotel (out of town interviewee) and emailed from a laptop or the business center. Now that earned an extra point on my written evaluation.
     


  8. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    I personally subscribe to the topcat view on how long to wait before sending an email (does this sound like a discussion from swingers, or what?)

    If you're going to send an email, I'd wait until the following day, or at least late the day of the interview, depending on when the interview was. If you're going to send a letter, it's fine to write it and drop it in the mail right away, IMO.
     


  9. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    email the next morning, my vote
     


  10. Wedge

    Wedge Member

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    I send them out the next day and usually work on them the night after the interview...since I am looking for a new job I have been writing a few lately.
     


  11. retronotmetro

    retronotmetro Senior member

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    Heh. In this case, six days definitely would not be "money."
     


  12. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    (drizzt3117 @ Mar. 10 2005,15:24) I personally subscribe to the topcat view on how long to wait before sending an email (does this sound like a discussion from swingers, or what?)
    Heh. In this case, six days definitely would not be "money."
    If it's over a long weekend, it could be SO money... [​IMG]
     


  13. Kai

    Kai Senior member

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    If this is an important interview, then send a hand written note.

    If this is one of a million interviews you are doing as part of a recruiting fair, then send an e-mail or a hand signed printed letter.
     


  14. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    One caveat, I would only hand write a note if you have good handwriting. If you have poor handwriting, it's probably better to print a letter. I've always thought (as a professional applicant or student) that a laser printed letter on your company (or school) stationery, in a envelope with your logo on it, is pretty good, as you're showing that you're taking the time to do so.
     


  15. linux_pro

    linux_pro Senior member

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    I always send a thank you letter or card. It shows that you regularly "go the extra mile", and that means a lot to employers looking to fill a position of higher responsibility. Email doesn't mean as much. Anyone can type up an email in their underwear. Taking the time to personally address a thank you to each of your interviewers shows that you are organized, and have put some effort into it. It also shows that you are motivated and thoughtful. Many other things too. Simply put, a hand-written note or card on the desk of any employer is going to make a much bigger impression than an email that might be accidentally deleted right along with all the spam they received that day. And it is unthinkable to send nothing, unless the position is of very low importance to the company. [​IMG]
     


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