1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

PLEASE Help! Fashion crisis for a tall slim guy!

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by madtownmatt, Jun 22, 2006.

  1. Matt

    Matt Senior member

    Messages:
    11,179
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Location:
    Sunny Saigon
    I don't understand why this should be the case. Why not buy a collar that fits to start with? And slimming the arms is done easily, as long as the sides are being taken in. I often have Brooks' traditional fit (i.e., enormously tent-like) shirts taken in dramatically and have had no problems.
    sidebar doc - how much does the tailor charge you for the alteration?
     
  2. raley

    raley Senior member

    Messages:
    781
    Joined:
    May 22, 2004
    I don't understand why this should be the case. Why not buy a collar that fits to start with? And slimming the arms is done easily, as long as the sides are being taken in. I often have Brooks' traditional fit (i.e., enormously tent-like) shirts taken in dramatically and have had no problems.

    Don't shoulders and chest size scale with neck size? I admit that slimming down arms is easy (although my tailor can't seem to understand what slim means, so maybe that is my bias, and maybe I need a new tailor), but you can't exactly alter shoulders and chest. If my chest size is 42" (for a shirt, 38" with measuring tape), and a 16.5" shirt gets me a 50" chest, and my shoulders are 18" and the 16.5" shirt gets me 21" inch shoulders, don't you think the shirt would like a bit ridiculous with a fitted waist, slim sleeves, and huge armholes/shoulders?
     
  3. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    16,118
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Location:
    Tombstone
    Don't shoulders and chest size scale with neck size? I admit that slimming down arms is easy (although my tailor can't seem to understand what slim means, so maybe that is my bias, and maybe I need a new tailor), but you can't exactly alter shoulders and chest. If my chest size is 42" (for a shirt, 38" with measuring tape), and a 16.5" shirt gets me a 50" chest, and my shoulders are 18" and the 16.5" shirt gets me 21" inch shoulders, don't you think the shirt would like a bit ridiculous with a fitted waist, slim sleeves, and huge armholes/shoulders?

    The armholes can be reduced along with the chest and sleeves. When the tailor reduces the width of the shirt, he can then create a new bottom to the armhole. This reduces the sleeve, armhole and width all in one fell swoop.

    As long as the shoulders and collar fit properly, the shirt should be fine.
     
  4. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    16,118
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Location:
    Tombstone
    sidebar doc - how much does the tailor charge you for the alteration?

    Mine charges $15 or so.
     
  5. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    16,118
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Location:
    Tombstone
    To continue my string of posts, I'll now employ a crude graphic device in hopes of making things more clear.

    Let's say this is the shirt you're staring with. (Pretend it's a button-up; this happened to be the first simple line drawing I came across.) The shirt is great in that it fits well in the collar and shoulders, but it's much too large in the arms and torso:

    [​IMG]

    Here's how the tailor raises the armholes and trims the fit:

    [​IMG]

    Leaving you with this:

    [​IMG]

    It's an easy alteration. The important thing, as I mentioned earlier, is that the shirt fits well at the collar and shoulders to start with. I've had little trouble with this; shoulder size increases with overall size, yes, but not as dramatically as you might imagine. The shoulder seam might not sit exactly perfectly at the corner of the shoulder, but it won't be that far off, usually. Just something to look for when buying a shirt.
     
  6. raley

    raley Senior member

    Messages:
    781
    Joined:
    May 22, 2004
    Hmm, this is interesting. I think I might need to try to find a new tailor because my current one doesn't really communicate with me that well, and hasn't been able to do anything as dramatic as this.

    Is it important to just do this with lower-quality shirts, such as Brooks Brothers? One thing that concerns me is that if there is something like pattern matching or small amounts of handwork on a shirt, it may not be able to replicated. What do you think about this?
     
  7. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    16,118
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Location:
    Tombstone
    Hmm, this is interesting. I think I might need to try to find a new tailor because my current one doesn't really communicate with me that well, and hasn't been able to do anything as dramatic as this.

    Is it important to just do this with lower-quality shirts, such as Brooks Brothers? One thing that concerns me is that if there is something like pattern matching or small amounts of handwork on a shirt, it may not be able to replicated. What do you think about this?


    Much will depend on the skills of your tailor, and what you value most highly. I wouldn't buy or wear an oversized shirt that I felt I couldn't have tailored. Beautiful pattern matching does me no good if my shirt fits poorly.

    You're right in that it's important to have a good tailor to do these things. Even on something as simple as a solid-color shirt, a poor choice in thread can create a conspicuous contrast between the original seams and the new ones.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by