Placket or not placket?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Recoil, Apr 19, 2008.

  1. padronlover

    padronlover Senior member

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    i personally hate french placket and think plain looks much cleaner...
     


  2. Philosoph

    Philosoph Senior member

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    I think French plackets are dressier than standard plackets. The only shirts of mine that have standard plackets are OCBDs.

    Same here.
     


  3. Philosoph

    Philosoph Senior member

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    i personally hate french placket and think plain looks much cleaner...

    French placket = plain front.
     


  4. Recoil

    Recoil Senior member

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    i personally hate french placket and think plain looks much cleaner...

    I think I agree here, it makes the shirt look much more uniform, although I think the french front does look good on a button-down due to its casual nature.
     


  5. sonlegoman

    sonlegoman Senior member

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    I like the French placket because it produces a slight asymmetry that lines up with the asymmetry of the right-most edge of the belt buckle (my belt is not symmetrical, ie, it is not a square adorning buckle but a functional loop buckle). The asymmetry continues down to the placket of the pants. This is the way they do it in the military.
     


  6. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    I think I agree here, it makes the shirt look much more uniform, although I think the french front does look good on a button-down due to its casual nature.

    There seems to be some confusion over what constitutes a 'French' placket. A French placket is 'plain' in the sense that there is no seam or stitching distinguishing it from the body of the shirt.

    This is a French placket:
    [​IMG]
     


  7. Recoil

    Recoil Senior member

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    No confusion on this end, I agreed with the poster that I quoted that the plain placket does look better, but I said I preferred the french placket on my button down shirts because it looks a little more casual.
     


  8. Philosoph

    Philosoph Senior member

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    There is confusion, because the french placket is the plain one.
     


  9. Recoil

    Recoil Senior member

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    I think the confusion is that when some people are using "plain" placket they mean "standard" or whatever other term you want to use. Two prior posters have acknowledged that French and Plain are the two types.
     


  10. Philosoph

    Philosoph Senior member

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    Let's try again...

    We're talking about two different kinds of shirt fronts: placket, and no placket (plain). The French front is the "no placket (plain)" option.
     


  11. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    I think the confusion is that when some people are using "plain" placket they mean "standard" or whatever other term you want to use. Two prior posters have acknowledged that French and Plain are the two types.

    To be clear then, you believe a standard placket (one where fabric overlaps the buttonholes and is stitched to the shirt) makes a shirt look more 'uniform' than a French placket, where this is no stitching or overlapping fabric? And you believe a French placket is more casual although button-down shirts and sport shirts typically use standard plackets?
     


  12. Gene22

    Gene22 Active Member

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    I just had a few shirts made up and got them with plain plackets so I wouldn't have to worry about shrinking. Once I get a few more into the rotation I might go the other way since a few shrunken plackets won't destroy 100% of my shirts.

    ~ Graham
     


  13. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I like them both ways. The plain is a bit more modern and I select them to coordinate a more modern, cool look.
     


  14. EasyGoing

    EasyGoing Senior member

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    Let's try again...

    We're talking about two different kinds of shirt fronts: placket, and no placket (plain). The French front is the "no placket (plain)" option.


    That's how I've heard it. Placket or French front.

    I've just ordered a couple French front and I'm curious how much I like them. Everything standard has been with a standard placket. Nonetheless, if you're wearing a tie either is going to be hard to notice.
     


  15. Recoil

    Recoil Senior member

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    To be clear then, you believe a standard placket (one where fabric overlaps the buttonholes and is stitched to the shirt) makes a shirt look more 'uniform' than a French placket, where this is no stitching or overlapping fabric? And you believe a French placket is more casual although button-down shirts and sport shirts typically use standard plackets?

    I'm only using the terms that the first two people in this thread used. If "French" and "Plain" are not the proper way to describe them then that is fine, replace "plain" with "standard" or "with placket".

    Either way, yes, I do believe that the placket makes the shirt look more uniform becasue once it's done up then you can't tell on which side of the shirt the buttons are sewn. Because of this, I find the "French" or "no placket" to be a little less formal, my Oriali button-down is this way and it looks quite more casual to me.
     


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