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pick stitching on suits

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by MilanoStyle, Nov 6, 2004.

  1. MilanoStyle

    MilanoStyle Senior member

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    When I see tiny pick stitching (almost look like small ripples) on the edge of lapes, it gives me impression of canvased lapels.

    My question is,

    1. Have you seen fused suits that have picked stitchings on lapel?

    2. Is picked stitching serves as purpose in canvased lapels? When lapel is canvased, does it need to have picked stitching?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    1. Sure.

    2. No, but if a maker goes to the trouble to make a canvas front, it is not common for him to skimp on the lapel edge.
     
  3. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    I have seen what _appeared to me_ to me to be half-canvas, pick-stitching on Southwick suits.

    I do know that private label stores are able to specify certain details from Southwick and other makers for their suits. So it is entirely possible, I suppose to have things like pick-stitching and other details on a particular suit.

    On occasion, I happen to prefer not to have pick-stitched lapels.

    For instance, to me the classic Brooks blazer sans pick-stitch looks better than the other possibility.
     
  4. armscye

    armscye Senior member

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    Many of the third tier Italian fused suits (Cuseri, Davico, Cesarani) these days do a very authentic looking machine copy of pick stitching, so it is a feature-- like four cuff buttons-- that is becoming middlebrow.
     
  5. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    Yep. I personally think that the more pronounced the pick-stitching, the more Eurotrashy the suit looks. Personally, I prefer no extraneous details like this, unless the details of the suit are obviously all hand done (like on an Attolini or Kiton tuxedo.) Give me a Costume National suit with no gimmicky details (ticket pockets, hand stitching, etc...), just great cutting, any day.
     
  6. djkovner

    djkovner Well-Known Member

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    I've seen some suits that have pick stitching on the vertical seam in the back. Which makers do this? Is it necessarily the mark of a well-made suit?
     
  7. MilanoStyle

    MilanoStyle Senior member

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    I saw attolini has such stitchin.
     
  8. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

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  9. T4phage

    T4phage Senior member

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    One can easily tell whether the "Pick stitching" is done by machine or hand, just look at the back.
     
  10. truthhurts

    truthhurts Senior member

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    At the moment I think pick stitching is copied enough that it doesn't say anything about a suit's quality. I find really obvious pick stitching a bit gaudy.
     
  11. kabert

    kabert Senior member

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    I agree with truthhurts -- really blatant pickstitching on what's supposed to be a fine business suit especially is something I now view as tiring and a bit tacky. The pick stitching done on the high end suits is still subtle, and that's the way I like it -- look at an Oxxford or St. Andrews suit. Pick stitching is everywhere now too -- it's no longer a clear sign of a high-end suit. Just go into a Filene's Basement -- there are various suits you can find, of no-name brands, that have it.
     
  12. HitMan009

    HitMan009 Senior member

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    Pick stitching to my understanding is purely an aesthetic addition. It highlights the edges of the lapels, collars etc. I think the effect it produces is to make these areas stand out. On higher end suits, the lapels, collars lie perfectly flat to the chest. This sometimes can make them disappear into the jacket. With pick stitching, the edges are highlighted thus allowing the lapels to be a bit more visible. Now I am talking about very fine pick stitching using thread that is the same color as the suit. Don't be confused with some fashion forward trend to have some contrasting color. Nehows, these are my observations. I don't know if what I said is truly the case or not.
     
  13. armscye

    armscye Senior member

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    To some extent, we are tasking here about the Italian tradition of showing the artisan's hand (deliberately imperfect buttonholes, stitching that shows along various seams) as versus the desire of many American buyers to have a well-fitted but "machine made" suit. The Brits adhere more to the invisible hand view-- their topstitching (it's not really pickstitching at all) is very subtle and hard to detect.

    Re thread color: in theory, the thread color is nearly inconsequential since with good pick-stitching using fine silk thread, the thread re-enters the same hole it emerged from, draws tight beneath the fabric surface, and therefore it is the "dimple" that shows, not the thread loop.
     

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