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Perfect or imperfect fits

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by LA Guy, Mar 16, 2006.

  1. mass

    mass Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2006
    i guess it depends on how 'baggy' or 'oversized' (proportion wise) you mean. i think this works really well:

    [​IMG]
    (from the sartorialist)

    obviously the jacket fits very well, but the jeans are quite slim. i also think slim top somewhat baggy jeans looks pretty good sometimes (mostly on tall people).
     
  2. benchan

    benchan Senior member

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    Dec 3, 2004
    Deviate a bit from the topic. But to all the skinny guys out there, please, consider wearing slightly oversize clothing sometimes. It looks better on you. Please stop thinking that you are the Dior's model as I think sometimes you need particular facial features to pull off those looks.
     
  3. Arethusa

    Arethusa Senior member

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    Honestly, speaking as one of those skinny guys, I find oversized clothing just comically accentuates that skinniness.
     
  4. Sabrosa

    Sabrosa Senior member

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    Austin
    Honestly, speaking as one of those skinny guys, I find oversized clothing just comically accentuates that skinniness.

    I find this to be especially true with t-shirts (or really any shirt, for that matter), which when worn oversized can make your arms and chest look exceptionally skinny, even if you have some muscle to you.

    On the other hand, I do agree that slightly large jeans can look good depending on the cut/style of the jean.
     
  5. Brian SD

    Brian SD Senior member

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    Tokyo
    "looking good philosophy 101" I agree, that imperfections can enhance the look. I've always found it really attractive when a girl has a beautiful face with some subtle imperfection about it (slightly crooked teeth, or one eyelid that has three wrinkles in it while the other has two). I think the philosophy is kind of the same here. Most good designer clothing is tailored to achieve a certain look by its fit. For example, Engineered Garments clothing is tailored to look like workwear. The shoulders are square, the fit is boxy and the sleeves are short. As LA Guy pointed out, Yohji and Margiela clothes are sometimes also cut kind of loose to achieve their respective look - and I find that tidbit about the Y-3's inspiration fascinating. Even Dior clothing is not a perfect fit in the terms of body accentuating. Slimane's clothing is columnar, rigid and straight-fitting, while very slim. I think Tom Ford, Dolce & Gabbana, DSquared2 are examples of designers who try to make a "perfect" (a very subjective word in terms of clothing) fit and accentuate the body. BTW, I agree with Arethusa - baggy t-shirts NEVER look good on skinny people. This is what skinny guys look like in baggy shirts and shorts: [​IMG]
     
  6. j

    j Senior member Admin

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    Seattle, WA
    Very interesting discussion.

    To me, what makes up "style" is to a large degree the imitation of certain iconic silhouettes. What makes the biggest psychological impression on the viewer is an association with learned, animal-level generalizations. These can be so subtle that with a different shoulder on a jacket or width here or there in a garment, an entirely different archetype is recalled.

    I had more to say, but I lost it. Maybe later.
     
  7. nairb49

    nairb49 Senior member

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    Seemingly, the perpetual problem "analysts" like ourselves are going to encounter is the "general public", which in itself is already problematic blanket terminology, I know. Basically, though there are plenty of people who are aware of the designer's philosophy and aim of the collection, I would say that the vast majority of customers don't know, and don't really care. Yohji for example, is VERY rarely worn correctly. Partly because many people don't know, but mainly because those people who aren't "in the know" simply don't agree, or find visually appealing, his design aesthetic. But us analysts who do follow/appreciate the principle behind it take a skewed view because we don't see it "as it is", we see it encompassing more than just a look. ie. we're special [​IMG] Just my opinion, probably stating the obvious. Edit- J, would like to see where you're going with that, interesting take.
     
  8. Dill

    Dill Senior member

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    LA Guy, I remember you saying that you picked up those Corpus Fine's from Barneys with a 34 waist. Did you end up keeping them? I got them too and the waist definately requires me to wear a belt but I still like how they fit. A little baggy through the thighs but the rest of the legs seem to be a bit skinnier than my Rescues. So I guess I am a fan of the imperfect fit, even though I have never tried on a true "skinny" jean.
     
  9. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    LA Guy, I remember you saying that you picked up those Corpus Fine's from Barneys with a 34 waist. Did you end up keeping them? I got them too and the waist definately requires me to wear a belt but I still like how they fit. A little baggy through the thighs but the rest of the legs seem to be a bit skinnier than my Rescues. So I guess I am a fan of the imperfect fit, even though I have never tried on a true "skinny" jean.

    Yeah, I kept mine, and they definitely require a belt right now. They must have changed up the sizing a little. Either that, or the different treatments can really shrink the jeans, because my Morphys had a heat treatment of some sort and were super tight to begin with (I'm talking Superfutures tight,) while the Fines are a true one rinse. I am wondering how much shrinkage there is going to be after I wash these in warm after some wear. I actually like the extra room in the butt and thighs tapering off to a skinnier leg, though.
     
  10. Dill

    Dill Senior member

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    Yeah, I kept mine, and they definitely require a belt right now. They must have changed up the sizing a little. Either that, or the different treatments can really shrink the jeans, because my Morphys had a heat treatment of some sort and were super tight to begin with (I'm talking Superfutures tight,) while the Fines are a true one rinse. I am wondering how much shrinkage there is going to be after I wash these in warm after some wear. I actually like the extra room in the butt and thighs tapering off to a skinnier leg, though.

    I have not washed mine yet either, so I also wonder how much they will shrink.
     

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