1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

people who bitch about tipping are scum?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Teger, Jul 22, 2011.

  1. thebarbaron

    thebarbaron Member

    Messages:
    6
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    Interesting thread to wade through. I worked a short time in food service, more counter service, some food running and wine bar/coffee shop stuff. Many of my friends and coworkers have waited tables (a few in very high-end fine dining, most in average family night out restaurants), and I've been formulating rules for tipping based on both common courtesy and those shared experiences. While the stigma among young people against undertippers is very high (a number of them seem to regard arsonists more favorably than cheapskates), there is a social contract implied in the act of eating out.

    When you go out to eat, it's understood that you will behave with some decorum, and obey laws and common social mores. The waitstaff will do their best to be at least adequately attentive to your (reasonable) needs, keep your drinks filled, your food coming, and your experience pleasant and neither hurried nor too slow. In exchange, you are implicitly agreeing to pay for the food and the service provided. You have the discretion to name what the service is worth, but unless you didn't get any service to speak of, it should be considered as worth something. The menu price pays for the overhead, the raw ingredients, and the wages of those employees who do not interact with you directly for appreciable time. It also pays the small portion of the waitstaff's wages that goes to taxes, which means their take-home pay is your tip or less. This is an important consideration with those unused to American service practices.

    These are the rules I endeavor to follow, and suggest to fellow diners if they ask for advice.
    At a sit-down meal with table service, 15% is a good rule of thumb for average service. This should not require extraordinary effort on their part; if they brought your food promptly, refilled your drinks a few times, and were moderately attentive, they have earned that average rate.
    If the service is very good, they were helpful, frequently available, and a pleasant aid to your meal, 20% is a nice way to say "thank you" and reward a job well done with a slightly higher incentive.
    (20% may also be advisable for average service if you needed special attention - i.e., multiple substitutions, asking for items not on the menu, needing to split the check in a dozen different ways)
    If the service is extraordinary and they go out of their way to help you (bringing a special dessert gratis, preparing something normally not on the menu, or nursing you through a three hour long dinner reunion with friends), more than 20% may be called for.
    If the service is underwhelming (slow, mechanical, only check on you a time or two, significant mistakes in the order), 10% is an acceptable way to constructively criticize.
    If the service is so truly awful (40 minutes before drinks come out, no drink refills, egregious uncorrected errors) you feel motivated to leave less than 10% (especially an "insult tip" of a penny, a few coins, a nasty note, or a tiny amount of any kind), do not leave any tip. Speak to the manager, in person or on the phone, and politely explain that the service was unsatisfactory, and why. Do not demand recompense or the public discipline of a server. Do not yell or make a scene. Doing any of the above only makes you as rude as your waiter was.
    If you have to forgo a tip for the aforementioned reason, don't return to the scene of the crime. If for some reason you simply must eat there again, come in with fresh expectations and no grudges. If they do well, congratulations. If things go poorly again, DO NOT GO BACK and demand more poor service.

    Waiting well takes skill, training, knowledge, and effort. Waiting adequately takes at least two or three of the above. Hospitality professionals should be treated with respect and courtesy, and the mantra of "the customer is always right" should be their mindset, not yours.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. Fuuma

    Fuuma Senior member

    Messages:
    25,818
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    

    You give $2-3 bucks if it's something normal for one person. If you ordered 20 pizzas and 2 without anchovies, one without bla bla etc. then you give the man a $10 or so.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. teddieriley

    teddieriley Senior member

    Messages:
    8,488
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2006
    Location:
    Wait, you smell that?
    I remember when I was a young boy ordering pizza from Domino's for dinner on a rainy night. The total was a flat $10, and when the delivery man rang the doorbell, moms, from upstairs, tells me to grab the money from her purse. I open the door, take the pizzas and give the guy two 5s. He just looks at me for a second, I look at him for a second thinking to myself "what, that's 10 bucks," then I shut the door in his face not thinking anything of it. Moms asked how much it was, I said $10 and she said did you tip the guy? I said no, feeling horrible. It was raining, cold and the guy was some middle-aged middle eastern guy just trying to make a living. I felt bad, and still kind of do till this day. Live and learn.
     
  4. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    I bet that man is dead now. Just sayin.
     
  5. teddieriley

    teddieriley Senior member

    Messages:
    8,488
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2006
    Location:
    Wait, you smell that?
    

    Unless you're saying he was killed or died prematurely, I'm not THAT OLD, man!
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2011
  6. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    That lack of 3 bucks killed him, you bastard.
     
  7. teddieriley

    teddieriley Senior member

    Messages:
    8,488
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2006
    Location:
    Wait, you smell that?
    

    You should have seen the look on his face right before I slammed the door. I still sort of remember it today. He looked like that one-armed man/killer from The Fugitive with Harrison Ford and Tommy Lee Jones.

    I should have told him, "Stay dry in this rain, SUCKA!" <SLAM>
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2011
  8. amglol

    amglol Member

    Messages:
    18
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2011
    I tip 20% as a general rule, but I don't hesitate to tip a big, fat ass 0% if I receive truly abhorrent service. A tip is earned, and shouldn't be taken for granted.

    Employers are required to make up the difference if tips + wage don't add up to minimum wage, so it's really on the server to earn anything extra.
     
  9. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

    Messages:
    11,352
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    Location:
    Pennsylvania Ave/Connecticut Ave
    Whenever I tip zero I leave a little note as to why.
     
  10. amglol

    amglol Member

    Messages:
    18
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2011
    Absolutely. No reason doing it just to be a dick. At lease let them know why and what can be done better, even if that's getting a new career...
     
  11. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    14,340
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    
    The feedback is important for their sakes but it also saves you from being a total dick. Often its misconstrued as you being a cheap ass.
     
  12. Quatsch

    Quatsch Senior member

    Messages:
    630
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    
    This is the law, yes. How often this law is actually followed is another question entirely.
     
  13. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,384
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    

    What does this mean? Is it argument by shadowy innuendo? It is a completely common form of employment contract, hardly limited to waiters.
     
  14. Quatsch

    Quatsch Senior member

    Messages:
    630
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    

    It means that while by law, restaurants are supposed to make up the difference if tipped employees don't end up making minimum wage. In reality, however, this law does not seem to be enforced. Shortly put - from my experiences and those of my (now former! not a server anymore!!!) colleages, restaurants ignore this law and if you don't make minimum wage its tough noogies.
     
  15. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    14,340
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    I'd never even heard of this.
     
  16. earthdragon

    earthdragon Senior member

    Messages:
    2,729
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2006
    Such Ignorant Bullshit. Any restaurant that does not ensure their Servers are at least making minimum wage (via Tip Credit), are completely open to serious litigation from disgruntled employees.
    Here in DC there are a lot of Operations paying servers $2.80 - $3.00 an hour (many of who walk with way more than minimum wage, even after tipping in bussers, runners etc).

    California is a different story - with no tip credit = businesses take a huge hit on the labor line.

    I am in restaurants and personally hate the 'Auto Grat' thing on large bookings, however DC does appear to be a cheap ass town - so it is a fine balancing act keeping both guests and employees happy.
     
  17. Mark from Plano

    Mark from Plano Senior member

    Messages:
    10,767
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2007
    Location:
    Not in Plano
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2012
  18. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
  19. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

    Messages:
    27,420
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Location:
    NE PA
    Wow, some pathetic douche really had to try to enhance his e-rep by making a fake receipt. What a toolbag.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by