Paul Smith Shoes

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by insolentpup, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. insolentpup

    insolentpup Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    So I bought a pair of Paul Smith shoes. They cost €245, which is $325. A lot of money for me.

    Anyway, I wore them for the first time today and within seconds I could feel them digging into the medial side of my heel. I couldn't turn back and had to wear them for the day. Agony.

    So I'll be taking them back (hopefully still have my receipt) but I'm posting because I'm wondering is this common or do I have a strange shaped foot? Will repeated wear make them comfortable? Is this not absolutely appalling given the price of the shoes? How can I pay this much and be in agony

    Any opinions are welcome
     


  2. atia2

    atia2 Senior member

    Messages:
    428
    Likes Received:
    221
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    If you noticed it within seconds, then you really should have noticed it in the store. I don't see how you can take these back now: I assume they're not faulty and you've worn them so they can't be resold. But best of luck with it.
     


  3. insolentpup

    insolentpup Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    In store I only tried for size, and walked only briefly. I assumed there would not be any problems that would emerge after a couple of minutes or so. Perhaps within seconds was an exaggeration.
     


  4. atia2

    atia2 Senior member

    Messages:
    428
    Likes Received:
    221
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Yes, I've been there and it's very annoying. The fit seems fine in store and then the shoe starts to nip some extremity of your foot after a few hours of wear. A particular problem if:

    (a) you have an unusual foot shape (I have low arch, low instep, and widely-splayed toes - like a flipper); and/or
    (b) you don't know how to evaluate the fit properly in store (which was the case with me about a year ago).

    Unfortunately I had to take fairly substantial hits on three pairs of top quality shoes (two Cleverleys and a Lobb) that I couldn't return as they'd been worn a couple of times. I sold them second-hand and took approx 40% loss overall. But I now know exactly what I'm looking for when I try on a shoe.
     


  5. insolentpup

    insolentpup Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2010
    

    That's interesting that you had that experience. How di you know what to look for when trying on? And also is there anything I can get stitched on to the shoe to cushion the spot?
     


  6. FlaneurNYC

    FlaneurNYC Senior member

    Messages:
    1,314
    Likes Received:
    47
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2007
    Location:
    In A Gadda Da Vida, Baby!
    

    I doubt that PS will take the shoes back if you've worn them.

    While I don't know what the problem with fit is, it might take some breaking in. I also don't know of anything that can be sewn inside the shoe, but there is a product that can stick to your feet.

    http://www.drscholls.com/products/MoleskinPlusPadding
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2013


  7. atia2

    atia2 Senior member

    Messages:
    428
    Likes Received:
    221
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Once you've experienced a few problems due to the idiosyncrasies of your feet, you'll know what to look for. In my case, I now know when there is too much room in the vamp for my thin feet (which causes slippage inside the shoe and, therefore, friction) and when there is too little room around the little toe (which has a tendency to get nipped if the last angles in too much as it tapers to the toebox.) Your "red flags" will, of course, be different to mine.

    As for corrective measures, I prefer to sell a shoe that doesn't fit and use the money to buy one that does. But insoles and tongue pads can help an overly voluminous shoe while a good cobbler can stretch a small shoe, more so the width than the length.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by