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Pardon my French but...

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by VKK3450, Dec 21, 2004.

  1. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

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    Ok, I remember reading somewhere that a problem with sitting on leather chairs is that it makes the seat of your wool trousers look shiny and prematurely worn. As I sit on a leather chair all day, I immediately became concerned for my beloved suits and trousers.

    Upon inspection it appears that yes, there is some shininess on my bottom. More so on finer fabrics than others, but it is definitely there. (Don't ask how I checked during the course of the work day)

    My question is this - How can I avoid/minimize/fix this shiny butt syndrome? Shy of bringing my own chair (try to explain that one in the office) or giving up my nicer clothes (not an option in my opinion).

    I can't stand the thought that my sitting in this chair all day long is absolutely killing this Canali suit.

    Thanks for your help
     
  2. ernest

    ernest Senior member

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    Your French?
     
  3. johnnynorman3

    johnnynorman3 Senior member

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    a little light steam should alleviate the problem.
     
  4. NoVaguy

    NoVaguy Senior member

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    "Pardon my French" is slang for "excuse me for using less than appropriate language".

    Remember, Americans like to pick on and make fun of the French. That's why various Republicans hinted that Kerry looked "French"....
     
  5. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    (ernest @ 21 Dec. 2004, 1:23) Your French?
    "Pardon my French" is slang for "excuse me for using less than appropriate language". Remember, Americans like to pick on and make fun of the French. That's why various Republicans hinted that Kerry looked "French"....
    Does he? Maybe Ernest can help. Jon.
     
  6. STYLESTUDENT

    STYLESTUDENT Senior member

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    Also, make a conscious effort not to put your hands in your pockets, to avoid shininess in that area. Leather or smooth wood will make the pants seat more shiny than upholstered fabrics (I'm serious-I have two chairs in my office and don't use the leather one). Steam helps a bit, but other "solutions" (pressing pants with white vinegar - found this on the internet) are ridiculous. I agree it's an irritating problem.
     
  7. kabert

    kabert Senior member

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    I've heard about this before on a prior thread here, but . . . I've been sitting in a leather office chair 5+ days a week for the last 10 years and have never noticed this problem on my slacks. Are you sure it's not just normal wear due to the friction of pant fabric against something else?
     
  8. STYLESTUDENT

    STYLESTUDENT Senior member

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    How often are you wearing the Canali suit you reference? If you're wearing it every week or are having it dry-cleaned two or more times per year, it's just unavoidable rapid wear (and I'd agree with Kabert that the chair surface has nothing to do with it).
     
  9. ernest

    ernest Senior member

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    False.

    It works pretty well. I tried for shirt collar.

    Vinegar+water

    If the fabrics is used, it would change nothing. It is just when fabrics has been iron too hot and fibers are crashed.
     
  10. STYLESTUDENT

    STYLESTUDENT Senior member

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    (STYLESTUDENT @ 21 Dec. 2004, 7:54) but other "solutions" (pressing pants with white vinegar - found this on the internet) are ridiculous.
    False. It works pretty well. I tried for shirt collar. Vinegar+water If the fabrics is used, it would change nothing. It is just when fabrics has been iron too hot and fibers are crashed.
    Ernest, Although I'm glad that the vinegar solution helped you with your own crushed shirt collar problem (I remember your thread), ironing with vinegar won't take the shine out of used pants. I've tried it-all I got was my daughter telling me the kitchen smelled awful).
     
  11. ernest

    ernest Senior member

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    (ernest @ 21 Dec. 2004, 11:48)
    but other "solutions" (pressing pants with white vinegar - found this on the internet) are ridiculous.
    False. It works pretty well. I tried for shirt collar. Vinegar+water If the fabrics is used, it would change nothing. It is just when fabrics has been iron too hot and fibers are crashed.
    Ernest, Although I'm glad that the vinegar solution helped you with your own crushed shirt collar problem (I remember your thread), ironing with vinegar won't take the shine out of used pants. I've tried it-all I got was my daughter telling me the kitchen smelled awful).
    I agree. But this tip is not for USED fabrics.
     
  12. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

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    Frequency of wear of each my suits is probably about once every 2 weeks max. Less at some parts of the year. I only dry clean when absolutely necessary.

    But the Canali was just an example. While they are not Kiton, I hate the idea that day in/day out I am sitting in a chair which is slowly killing my Canali/Zegna/Polo/Etc... suits. If I am going to kill a beautiful (and not so cheap) suit, I would prefer that it was for something heroic like shredding it while scaling a barbed wire fence to save a stranded puppy or something. Not sitting at a desk doing my thankless job.

    I do steam my suits, but never really spent much time on the butt section so maybe I'll give that more attention in the future. Otherwise any other recommendations? I do fear the vinegar thing as I am not fully convinced that you can't smell it afterwards.

    Thanks,

    K

    PS - Sorry Ernest, its just a common phrase. Nothing of consequence.
     
  13. STYLESTUDENT

    STYLESTUDENT Senior member

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    The section below in quotes is from the Kilgour, French, & Stanbury website:

    ") Trousers tend to wear much more quickly than the jacket on almost all suits. A few do's and don'ts: a)Don't sit on leather as this shines the seat of the trousers b)Don't stuff the pockets full of coins, keys, wallets etc unless you tell your tailor to strengthen the pockets when ordering the suit. He will then use stronger materials. c) Do turn the trouser at the knee when seated so it doesn't stretch. d) Do re-enforce the bottom on the trousers to stop fraying. e)Do ask for a zip rather than buttons which while vastly more practical also avoids problems with pressing."

    If you're wearing a suit, say, 25 times a year (once every two weeks), my own experience is that the pants will look shiny and worn out in 4-5 years. There's no remedy. Two pairs of pants per suit is the solution if you're bespoke (but not from EBay).
     
  14. chocoball

    chocoball Senior member

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    If you don't want to ruin your clothes with normal wear and tear, it's easy......just stand while you're working at your desk, don't sit down. Come to think of it, don't even walk outside in the morning. Just dress for work, then remove and put your pyjamas back on, work from home. Come on, it's only a suit, no matter how expensive. If you can't afford normal wear and tear, you should think about dropping down a price bracket or two and getting twice as many suits so as to minimise the wear...... Do you put on your Berluti's and then try to walk as lightly as possible? (avoiding all uncarpeted surfaces......haha)

    Sorry, I just had to say this, because some of your concerns are so ridiculous.
     

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