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Pairing oxford shoes with chinos

Is it acceptable to pair oxfords with chinos?

  • Yes, anytime, anywhere.

    Votes: 30 24.8%
  • Whenever you've got that "chino + oxfords" feeling.

    Votes: 21 17.4%
  • In a pinch (other pants at the cleaners, traveling, Halloween costume...)

    Votes: 29 24.0%
  • No, except maaaybe in a life or death situation.

    Votes: 41 33.9%

  • Total voters
    121

TheChihuahua

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in my opinion, for whatever it is worth, I think those shoes look great. And I can absolutely see those working in that smart casual/sports coat style look. I would actually think that’s where they are more appropriate rather than full blown suit (although I wouldn’t hesitate to wear them with a suit either).

I would 100% take those and a pair of chinos and a sports coat than a lot of derbies out there.

for example, I would take the ones you have pictured:
464CB995-724B-49BD-B5B2-06676880EBC9.jpeg


As a preference over this example below:
E17548A4-C887-48A1-A8F9-8B949E50E3E6.jpeg


and this is just my opinion, for whatever that’s worth. But the black derbies look sloppy, and with the sports coat and chino look they might drag it all down to a sloppy level. I am sure some people could pull it off, but I think most would end up with it coming off looking more sloppy than stylish.
your shoes, on the other hand, aren’t super formal, like say a black captoe Oxford. They are just very stylish without being too progressive or fashion forward.They have a classic look to them, but the brown and the suede really make them seem informal, but they are so well done that they don’t veer towards sloppy (for lack of a better term).

I like those a lot. Thanks for sharing.
 
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apShepard

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I should say that I never wear them with chinos, but I did get inspired by simon's review of the tlb artista ones
Escorial-Tweed-Oatmeal-jacket-500x625.jpg
 

TheChihuahua

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I think oxfords are only for suits.

To me, the demarcating line is oxford (meaning, the design of the facings). It doesn't matter to me the color, broguing, sole construction, etc. I think of oxfords as a formal shoe.
this comment confuses me.
just because of the lacing, the oxford is “formal” and a derby is not?

just among two of the examples you provided, I think the split toe derby is more formal than the brogued strand.
the derby is a much sleeker look, it appears to be the type of shoe that would shine and pop more.
the brogued strand is bulkier, and with so much broguing it comes off more as an informal country shoe.

Seems kind of arbitrary to just say due to the laces the brown heavily brogued shoe is “formal”, while the sleek and more dressy shoe is informal.

E831AEDD-4D5C-4D89-B09D-53C9F3C9E561.jpeg
 

dieworkwear

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this comment confuses me.
just because of the lacing, the oxford is “formal” and a derby is not?

just among two of the examples you provided, I think the split toe derby is more formal than the brogued strand.
the derby is a much sleeker look, it appears to be the type of shoe that would shine and pop more.
the brogued strand is bulkier, and with so much broguing it comes off more as an informal country shoe.

Seems kind of arbitrary to just say due to the laces the brown heavily brogued shoe is “formal”, while the sleek and more dressy shoe is informal.

View attachment 1608477
I don't know if I have anything more to say on this, to be honest. I would just be repeating myself. There are many things that go into the formality of a shoe -- color, shape, material, design details, etc. But the first cut is the style. In this case, an oxford is considered more formal than a derby, just as a derby is always going to be more formal than a loafer.

There are some shoes nowadays that don't make any sense, like green oxfords. But generally speaking, yes, an oxford is more formal than a derby. There's no "logic" to this. It's just how the visual language is used. Why is ancient madder for fall and raw silk for summer? No reason except for tradition.

There was once a member here named Voxsartoria, who wrote a good guide called "Coherent Combinations for Beginners." I think it's a good way to start thinking about how different parts of an outfit should align with each other. You may find it useful. It can be found here.
 
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RSS

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I remember some fellows wearing Oxfords with their chinos (usually khaki) when I was in college. It always struck me as a little much. Then again one of the fellows is now a very well known architect "Back East". He was good looking and -- Oxfords with khakis aside -- I generally respected his taste even in college.

While I haven't read the entire thread, I'd try a Derby or Blucher if you want lace-up.
 
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Phileas Fogg

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Interesting link, food for thought. In it he specifically mentions wearing oxfords with an odd jacket and not a suit, though.
of course you can. The same way as you could wear a derby with a suit. Or a loafer. It depends on the shoe.
 

vdubiv

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Rules my friends are meant to be broken, so lets raise the bar here why stop at chinos, lets wear AE Strands with jeans!
 

vdubiv

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with the right pair of jeans, why not?
I'm not going to lie, I have AE Strandmok's in different colors of suede and I do wear them to work with fresh crisp selvedge denim and I personally think it looks fine. Yes it breaks ever classic men's wear rule, but I either wear chino's to work or jean's. I own 2 suits which get dusted off maybe once a year for a company Christmas party.
I like to think of it as Modern Smart Casual. I like brogues, and wingtips but get them in less formal leather's with rubber soles.
 

TheChihuahua

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I don't know if I have anything more to say on this, to be honest. I would just be repeating myself. There are many things that go into the formality of a shoe -- color, shape, material, design details, etc. But the first cut is the style. In this case, an oxford is considered more formal than a derby, just as a derby is always going to be more formal than a loafer.

There are some shoes nowadays that don't make any sense, like green oxfords. But generally speaking, yes, an oxford is more formal than a derby. There's no "logic" to this. It's just how the visual language is used. Why is ancient madder for fall and raw silk for summer? No reason except for tradition.

There was once a member here named Voxsartoria, who wrote a good guide called "Coherent Combinations for Beginners." I think it's a good way to start thinking about how different parts of an outfit should align with each other. You may find it useful. It can be found here.
So this is where you lose me:
1. You created a rule (a hard and fast rule that you have repeated numerous times): oxfords only with suits

2.The basis of the rule is because “generally speaking” oxfords are more formal

well, in my opinion that rule is fatally flawed and ridiculous.

first, I would agree that many oxfords tend to be more formal.
but in your own post you just said this was a “generally speaking” concept, not a hard and fast rule.

seems to me that your rule should be that more formal shoes should be worn with suits, as opposed to saying “no oxfords with suits” but then admitting that the formality of the Oxford is only a general concept.

one of the reasons I am so thrown aback by your rule, is it flies in the face of what a lot of traditional companies even offer for products.
take Allen Edmonds for example. Say what you will about that company, but they are worthy of respect in what they have contributed to this field.
they have a shoe called a strand, and another called a McAllister. Both are oxfords. But both are heavily brogued, and come in more brown’ish or oxblood/mahogany style colors.
Neither shoe is made primarily for suit wearing (they go well with daytime professional suit wear, but are much more of a casual shoe than say the Allen Edmonds delray which is a split toe derby)

so is Allen Edmonds wrong in their production of the strand or the McAllister? Should those shoes be discontinued as it is against the rules to wear them casually? Are people wrong for having those shoes in their collection?
According to your rule, there is no place for a shoe like that.

sorry if I have gone too far with this conversation, I just saw this thread yesterday and was shocked at what, to me, felt like reading gentleman’s gazette made up rules.

also I don’t agree at all that derbies are more formal than loafers. Some derbies can be more formal, some loafers can be more formal. I think, generally speaking, they are about equal in formality. That said, I also think it’s easier to dress up most loafers than it is to dress up most derbies (altbough there are some nice derbies out there).

man’s as stated previously, I think you are interjecting your own region way too much into this rule. In California the sports coat look with a derby might come off better given the general nature of the area. But say New England in the fall, a shoe like the Allen Edmonds McAllister might be a better choice.
 

TheChihuahua

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Rules my friends are meant to be broken, so lets raise the bar here why stop at chinos, lets wear AE Strands with jeans!
withiut commenting on the jeans, apparently Allen Edmonds needs to discontinue the strand all together.
1. It’s not a formal enough shoe for suit wear
2. It’s an Oxford, so it can only be worn with suits.

so it has no place.
 

TheChihuahua

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I'm not going to lie, I have AE Strandmok's in different colors of suede and I do wear them to work with fresh crisp selvedge denim and I personally think it looks fine. Yes it breaks ever classic men's wear rule, but I either wear chino's to work or jean's. I own 2 suits which get dusted off maybe once a year for a company Christmas party.
I like to think of it as Modern Smart Casual. I like brogues, and wingtips but get them in less formal leather's with rubber soles.
that’s totally fine.
those aren’t “formal” shoes
The whole rule of “oxfords only with suits” is apparently based off the formality of the Oxford.
which is a completely flawed premis as many oxfords aren’t actually “formal”

the idea that the lace structure elevates a shoe to formal and thus limits when it can and can’t be worn is flawed.
 

TheChihuahua

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Of these 4 shoes, I would classify the derby as the most formal.
I would not consider any of the oxfords to be a “formal” shoe.

and again, I don’t wear chinos regularly, and I have loafers and such that I wear more casually (although I have a pair of Allen Edmonds Cornwallis with a lot of wear/patina that I were casually). So I’m not being defensive of my personal style here.

but a rule based on a generality that is somewhat false is a very flawed rule. Gentleman’s Gazette style.

56A0C3B8-3771-44CE-9161-253A7186F708.jpeg
 

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