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Sreezy36

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That's a great plan. Good start. Simple.

When deciding, at least early on, purchase what will yield the maximum number of utility. This way that piece becomes your "go to" . You will also be able to determine what is missing from your wardrobe based on that initial commission. Thereby making the next commission(s) as useful as the first.

Whilst that may sound too utilitarian and boring, establishing your foundational pieces with Bespoke will make future commissions easier (Bespoke or otherwise). You have time to explore and experiment after you knock out those initial pieces, so, again, be patient.

Good luck and have fun with it. 👍🏻

Interesting approach. My approach is slightly different. I agree with knocking out the core pieces that provide maximum utility first. However, within those core pieces and starting out with a new tailor, I prefer to first comision items that I will likely wear the least frequently.
My reasoning is that usually the first few garments are not going to be the best fitting. The primary reason is that EVERY tailor is most prone to making mistakes in the initial stages of the relationship. This is also the time in which the tailor is learning a client’s body and aesthetic preferences. More or less, in the context of my complete wardrobe, I will not wear those early garments as much as my later commissions, of which I expect to be much better fitting.

For example: My first double breasted jacket is my black barathea dinner jacket. Indeed, a tuxedo is a core item. However, it is a garment that I will not wear as frequently as perhaps a navy double breasted suit or blazer. Furthermore, my tailor can use that garment as a tool for perfecting my future double breasted comisions.

My approach isn’t for everyone, but it works for me.
 

stuffedsuperdud

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Interesting approach. My approach is slightly different. I agree with knocking out the core pieces that provide maximum utility first. However, within those core pieces and starting out with a new tailor, I prefer to first comision items that I will likely wear the least frequently.
My reasoning is that usually the first few garments are not going to be the best fitting. The primary reason is that EVERY tailor is most prone to making mistakes in the initial stages of the relationship. This is also the time in which the tailor is learning a client’s body and aesthetic preferences. More or less, in the context of my complete wardrobe, I will not wear those early garments as much as my later commissions, of which I expect to be much better fitting.

For example: My first double breasted jacket is my black barathea dinner jacket. Indeed, a tuxedo is a core item. However, it is a garment that I will not wear as frequently as perhaps a navy double breasted suit or blazer. Furthermore, my tailor can use that garment as a tool for perfecting my future double breasted comisions.

My approach isn’t for everyone, but it works for me.

This is what I do too but I think this approach is more for someone who already has a workhorse rotation and is looking to slowly add pieces that match exactly what he has in mind. I'm guessing in this day and age though a lot of people who go bespoke do it as a special one-time thing and want something versatile that will see a lot of action, or something they'll be able to dive into and start using right away. Non-enthusiasts might also just figure all tailors are the same and don't think enough about ongoing relationships. Do you ever watch Thomas Mahon's videos? I got a kick out of a few where he receives a stack of cut lengths for his most recent bespoke orders, and upon examining the pile he realizes it's nothing but variants of blue suiting material.
 

sargeinaz

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Interesting approach. My approach is slightly different. I agree with knocking out the core pieces that provide maximum utility first. However, within those core pieces and starting out with a new tailor, I prefer to first comision items that I will likely wear the least frequently.
My reasoning is that usually the first few garments are not going to be the best fitting. The primary reason is that EVERY tailor is most prone to making mistakes in the initial stages of the relationship. This is also the time in which the tailor is learning a client’s body and aesthetic preferences. More or less, in the context of my complete wardrobe, I will not wear those early garments as much as my later commissions, of which I expect to be much better fitting.

For example: My first double breasted jacket is my black barathea dinner jacket. Indeed, a tuxedo is a core item. However, it is a garment that I will not wear as frequently as perhaps a navy double breasted suit or blazer. Furthermore, my tailor can use that garment as a tool for perfecting my future double breasted comisions.

My approach isn’t for everyone, but it works for me.
I think this makes sense and what I’d do if I planned on using one tailor. If I wanted to try multiple, I wouldn’t do this due to cost.
 

Sreezy36

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This is what I do too but I think this approach is more for someone who already has a workhorse rotation and is looking to slowly add pieces that match exactly what he has in mind. I'm guessing in this day and age though a lot of people who go bespoke do it as a special one-time thing and want something versatile that will see a lot of action, or something they'll be able to dive into and start using right away. Non-enthusiasts might also just figure all tailors are the same and don't think enough about ongoing relationships. Do you ever watch Thomas Mahon's videos? I got a kick out of a few where he receives a stack of cut lengths for his most recent bespoke orders, and upon examining the pile he realizes it's nothing but variants of blue suiting material.

Yeah I’m not sure that I would personally recommend bespoke to anyone as a “one time thing.” I view it as a serious long term commitment to building a wardrobe. This is based on my experiences and I fully understand that others may view it differently.

I think this makes sense and what I’d do if I planned on using one tailor. If I wanted to try multiple, I wouldn’t do this due to cost.

I’m not opposed to trying out multiple tailors. However, I do believe that the best results come after commissioning multiple garments with an individual tailor consecutively. This allows time for pattern adjustments and learning.
 

BColl_Has_Too_Many_Shoes

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Interesting approach. My approach is slightly different. I agree with knocking out the core pieces that provide maximum utility first. However, within those core pieces and starting out with a new tailor, I prefer to first comision items that I will likely wear the least frequently.
My reasoning is that usually the first few garments are not going to be the best fitting. The primary reason is that EVERY tailor is most prone to making mistakes in the initial stages of the relationship. This is also the time in which the tailor is learning a client’s body and aesthetic preferences. More or less, in the context of my complete wardrobe, I will not wear those early garments as much as my later commissions, of which I expect to be much better fitting.

For example: My first double breasted jacket is my black barathea dinner jacket. Indeed, a tuxedo is a core item. However, it is a garment that I will not wear as frequently as perhaps a navy double breasted suit or blazer. Furthermore, my tailor can use that garment as a tool for perfecting my future double breasted comisions.

My approach isn’t for everyone, but it works for me.

If your approach brings you successful commissions, then it is the right approach. Doesn't really matter what I or others opine on the matter.

I do believe that various approaches offer newcomers more options. More options, for the most part, are good. I say that reluctantly because when it comes to books of fabrics, various patterns, and styles it can become overwhelming and confusing.
 

Texasmade

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I’m not opposed to trying out multiple tailors. However, I do believe that the best results come after commissioning multiple garments with an individual tailor consecutively. This allows time for pattern adjustments and learning.
Once you reach the mythical 11 commissions...
 

Megakurth

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He puts the dates on his website here. But more reliably, he also has an email list for each location, and you can email him to ask him to add you to the list at [email protected].
I had my first fitting with Simone in NYC last weekend and it was a very pleasant experience. I’m looking forward to the finished product.

I too am curious about Tiziano Bacci. I tried on one of their sample jackets and while it seemed solid, I couldn’t commit on the spot. Seemed like a very reasonable price for what was offered. He indicated he travels with Simone and would be back in NYC in October.
 

Sreezy36

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If your approach brings you successful commissions, then it is the right approach. Doesn't really matter what I or others opine on the matter.

I do believe that various approaches offer newcomers more options. More options, for the most part, are good. I say that reluctantly because when it comes to books of fabrics, various patterns, and styles it can become overwhelming and confusing.

I definitely agree. Also, many people are much easier to fit than me and have very satisfying experiences with their first bespoke project. Very little adjustments are needed and they wind up with a first garment that is very comfortable and wearable for the indefinite future. In that case, my approach would be less appropriate for them.
 

BColl_Has_Too_Many_Shoes

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I definitely agree. Also, many people are much easier to fit than me and have very satisfying experiences with their first bespoke project. Very little adjustments are needed and they wind up with a first garment that is very comfortable and wearable for the indefinite future. In that case, my approach would be less appropriate for them.

I would say I fall within the easy to fit camp. That is, provided the cutter leaves me slack in the shoulders, chest, and back. Most do because that is literally the first thing that comes out of my mouth when the lines of communication are open.

Ahhhh on that point, @Cotillion.... Communicate! Communicate your concerns and your desires. Reiterate if you have to. Do not delegate the work. Do not give suggestions on how they should do their job. Keep the focus on what you want. Let the tailor handle the making aspect.
Also, ideally you want to be speaking to the guy/gal cutting that jacket. Hopefully the individual measuring you and taking notes, is the same person fully involved in the creative process.

If it is a go-between (salesman), that could work as well. Typically, that salesman & cutter have had years upon years of experience working together (think Lishak and R. Anderson). If that salesman is new or doesn't have a relationship with the cutter (don't be afraid to ask), I wouldn't feel shy about inquiring for another associate or walking away altogether.
 

jaypee

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I had my first fitting with Simone in NYC last weekend and it was a very pleasant experience. I’m looking forward to the finished product.

I too am curious about Tiziano Bacci. I tried on one of their sample jackets and while it seemed solid, I couldn’t commit on the spot. Seemed like a very reasonable price for what was offered. He indicated he travels with Simone and would be back in NYC in October.

Yep Tiziano will be back in October.. I tried on the cashmere overcoat and the cost for wool was pretty sharp.. Just can't find any feedback or info

Will email him shortly.
 

Cotillion

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I would say I fall within the easy to fit camp. That is, provided the cutter leaves me slack in the shoulders, chest, and back. Most do because that is literally the first thing that comes out of my mouth when the lines of communication are open.

Ahhhh on that point, @Cotillion.... Communicate! Communicate your concerns and your desires. Reiterate if you have to. Do not delegate the work. Do not give suggestions on how they should do their job. Keep the focus on what you want. Let the tailor handle the making aspect.
Also, ideally you want to be speaking to the guy/gal cutting that jacket. Hopefully the individual measuring you and taking notes, is the same person fully involved in the creative process.

If it is a go-between (salesman), that could work as well. Typically, that salesman & cutter have had years upon years of experience working together (think Lishak and R. Anderson). If that salesman is new or doesn't have a relationship with the cutter (don't be afraid to ask), I wouldn't feel shy about inquiring for another associate or walking away altogether.

Great tips, thanks. I'm definitely going to frame the requests as the ultimate function I am looking to get out of the suit rather than try to make specific suggestions. I'm happy so far with the communication from a few tailors I have talked to already and it's making my selection process much easier since there are a few where I've already communicated directly with the cutter.
 

ssmart3

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I had my first fitting with Simone in NYC last weekend and it was a very pleasant experience. I’m looking forward to the finished product.

I too am curious about Tiziano Bacci. I tried on one of their sample jackets and while it seemed solid, I couldn’t commit on the spot. Seemed like a very reasonable price for what was offered. He indicated he travels with Simone and would be back in NYC in October.

The jacket that tried felt very light, which was attractive for a summer suit or jacket. Also, there is appeal to seeing him at the same time as Simone.
 

Crispyj

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PML pants, Zegna cream denim, Spring Ram khaki, Standeven navy Oxbridge flannel.
PXL_20230315_225458403.jpg
 

stuffedsuperdud

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Thanks for sharing your experience. You have hit on the part I am debating. Whether to go with a local LA tailor (less expensive, don't have to wait for a year to get the suit) or going with Savile Row (at least my early impression is the craftsmanship level is higher although that could just be perception of course and not the reality).

Maybe I'm just not romantic enough about tailoring, but from here it seems like a good chunk of what you're paying for when you go to a Row establishment is not necessarily any increase in quality but simply to subsidize the absurd rents they are charged by the Pollen Estate.

Beyond covering the rent, you're probably also paying for the chesterfield sofa, the mahogany wall panels, the slick Instagram page, and for a cutter and sales guy who took the time to mask their native accents with RP. I consider these marketing tactics but I understand that for others, that is an enjoyable aspect of the bespoke process and is worth paying for, so that's your call. Where the rubber finally meets the road though, I think we SF-ers have all seen enough horror story posts of ultra high end bespoke gone sideways to know that the allure of the Row is no guarantee of success.

All that said, a Savile Row suit still is on my sartorial checklist because why not check that box and add it to the pile of staple menswear items that I don't actually use that much, like my black captoes, blue hopsack blazer with gold buttons, and rotation of baggy OCBDs. But it's very far down the list simply because of the excitement-to-inconvenience (and cost) ratio. If I ever find myself in London for a 3 month period I'd be inclined to go and get it done once and for all, but to have to spend a year or longer trying to sync up my own schedule and travel plans with their USA trunk shows, for something that at the end of the day is just expensive clothes that may or may not be worth the price, it just seems like way too much trouble when I can have a local shop go from start to finish in a few weeks, and with me being able to swing by easily for fittings in between, and even saving a few bucks in the end to boot.
 
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Cotillion

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Maybe I'm just not romantic enough about tailoring, but from here it seems like a good chunk of what you're paying for when you go to a Row establishment is not necessarily any increase in quality but simply to subsidize the absurd rents they are charged by the Pollen Estate.

Beyond covering the rent, you're probably also paying for the chesterfield sofa, the mahogany wall panels, the slick Instagram page, and for a cutter and sales guy who took the time to mask their native accents with RP. I consider these marketing tactics but I understand that for others, that is an enjoyable aspect of the bespoke process and is worth paying for, so that's your call. Where the rubber finally meets the road though, I think we SF-ers have all seen enough horror story posts of ultra high end bespoke gone sideways to know that the allure of the Row is no guarantee of success.

All that said, a Savile Row suit still is on my sartorial checklist because why not check that box and add it to the pile of staple menswear items that I don't actually use that much, like my black captoes, blue hopsack blazer with gold buttons, and rotation of baggy OCBDs. But it's very far down the list simply because of the excitement-to-inconvenience (and cost) ratio. If I ever find myself in London for a 3 month period I'd be inclined to go and get it done once and for all, but to have to spend a year or longer trying to sync up my own schedule and travel plans with their USA trunk shows, for something that at the end of the day is just expensive clothes that may or may not be worth the price, it just seems like way too much trouble when I can have a local shop go from start to finish in a few weeks, and with me being able to swing by easily for fittings in between, and even saving a few bucks in the end to boot.

I can relate to where you're coming from. But I want to make something clear. I've been on this forum since 2010. While I haven't posted in a decade, I've still been reading over the years. I've built two entire cycles of wardrobes from thrifting at the absolute cheapest because that's what I could afford at the time. If cost was part of this current equation then I wouldn't be posting in a bespoke thread and I'd simply do what I've done - play the eBay/Posh game and find the best bargain for quality product I can find. But that's not what I'm looking for now. Now that I'm at a different point in life, the only question that really matters to me for this project is: what tailor has the greatest probability of producing the garment that I want? That's why I'm posting here now.
 

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