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dauster

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I don't naturally worry much about the exact appearance of the fit which I suppose is a little odd or misguided, but I'm usually think predominantly about the details of the design and the feel while wearing it. I spent most of my life settling for clothes that I found dull and samey that felt like straight-jackets whenever I tried to move my arms, so that's what I tend to think about. There's only so much lipstick one can put on a pig anyway, so you might as well make sure that it's happy regardless. There's also a touch more to me at the moment, so to speak, than there was in early July, which might account for some of the pulling.

My 'photographic approach' of setting a digital camera atop a pile of books on a stool, then using the timer function probably does no favors. Maybe this would go better if I were to hire a professional photographer or share my life with somebody else so that I wouldn't be left to do this alone, but I'm sure as Hell not doing that! Nevertheless, for a lark, I took a second round of pictures with slightly better lighting. Too bad about the model, though...

View attachment 1452709

The grey suit from the front, again.

View attachment 1452710

A view from the left side, but without my arms raised this time.

View attachment 1452708
The back again, with a somewhat unfortunate something happening at the lower back.

View attachment 1452707

As a curio, this is the back with the jacket unbuttoned. (I paradoxically need both a haircut and more hair)

The navy blazer definitely didn't show well in the first round of pictures. I shouldn't've been so impatient about getting them out. Anyway, second verse.

View attachment 1452712

The front, of course.

View attachment 1452713

A straight-armed left side view. (Curiously, the left side shots always looked slightly better than the right side shots that I took)

View attachment 1452711

The rear view, which, upon further inspection, does show a slight hint of the same trouble on the lower back.

Ah well, nonetheless...
all that matters is that you are happy but I still feel that a fuller suit that is less tight would benefit the overall look tremendously.

I would clearly say that the below suit really improves the look.
 

yywwyy

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Another newly completed bespoke jacket. Made with a lightweight vintage linen from Holland & Sherry. This was made unconstructed (no canvassing except for a slight bit at the shoulder area) and without any lining at all. Really happy with the results as it holds up shape while wearing superbly light and airy.

 

lordsuperb

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I don't naturally worry much about the exact appearance of the fit which I suppose is a little odd or misguided, but I'm usually think predominantly about the details of the design and the feel while wearing it. I spent most of my life settling for clothes that I found dull and samey that felt like straight-jackets whenever I tried to move my arms, so that's what I tend to think about. There's only so much lipstick one can put on a pig anyway, so you might as well make sure that it's happy regardless. There's also a touch more to me at the moment, so to speak, than there was in early July, which might account for some of the pulling.

My 'photographic approach' of setting a digital camera atop a pile of books on a stool, then using the timer function probably does no favors. Maybe this would go better if I were to hire a professional photographer or share my life with somebody else so that I wouldn't be left to do this alone, but I'm sure as Hell not doing that! Nevertheless, for a lark, I took a second round of pictures with slightly better lighting. Too bad about the model, though...

View attachment 1452709

The grey suit from the front, again.

View attachment 1452710

A view from the left side, but without my arms raised this time.

View attachment 1452708
The back again, with a somewhat unfortunate something happening at the lower back.

View attachment 1452707

As a curio, this is the back with the jacket unbuttoned. (I paradoxically need both a haircut and more hair)

The navy blazer definitely didn't show well in the first round of pictures. I shouldn't've been so impatient about getting them out. Anyway, second verse.

View attachment 1452712

The front, of course.

View attachment 1452713

A straight-armed left side view. (Curiously, the left side shots always looked slightly better than the right side shots that I took)
View attachment 1452711

The rear view, which, upon further inspection, does show a slight hint of the same trouble on the lower back.

Ah well, nonetheless...
These jackets are the same length? You're a heavy set guy, I would've kept the length of the first jackets your tailor created for you. The grey suit needs work, but I love the blue blazer.

2nd Iteration
1599273198442.png


1599273265584.png


1st iteration
1599273161429.png


1599273176067.png
 

Encathol Epistemia

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These jackets are the same length? You're a heavy set guy, I would've kept the length of the first jackets your tailor created for you. The grey suit needs work, but I love the blue blazer.
I had been thinking about comparisons across garments. I measured all four garments along center seam on the back from the top of the collar to the end of the jacket. I don't know whether this is a preferred method or not, it seemed like the best way to take a consistent measurement comparison. Curiously, the grey suit's jacket is 30" (76.2 cm) long, compared to 31" (78.7cm) for the blue fresco suit, while the blazer is 30 1/2" (77.5 cm) long and the brown sport coat is also 30" (76.2 cm) long. I can't recall discussing the length when I commissioned the jacket, as it was nearly a year ago, but I imagine that I would have suggested keeping the successful length of the blue suit's jacket. (It wasn't raised, but two of the jackets that John Di Pietro has made for me are also 31" (78.7 cm) long and the double-breasted one is 31 1/2" (80 cm) long)

I expect that I'll be invited back to Hoboken before the end of this year for a fitting. I'll have to revisit the matter then and decide upon broaching it then and try to determine how to do so.
 

Despos

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Might go with slightly narrower lapels next time, not much, around 1 cm, what do you think?

View attachment 1453333
Have a few observations.
The lapels appear wider on lighter colored jackets and when the gorge is so high and horizontal.
From this camera angle the collar is so small in relation to the lapel it makes the lapel look larger. If the gorge were lower and you see more of the collar and a fuller collar shape it creates a more balanced proportion. The collar looks skimpy in proportion to the lapel and makes the lapel look broader.
If the gorge is more angled from the neck to the point of the lapel, less horizontal, the lapel would look more narrow without reducing the lapel width.
If you do narrow the lapel I think 1/4" is enough.
I am not a fan of high gorge lines and this is one of the reasons.
 

Encathol Epistemia

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Dannefalk

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Might go with slightly narrower lapels next time, not much, around 1 cm, what do you think?

View attachment 1453333
Width looks good, I would lower the gorge and maybe the buttoning stance (hard to tell from the picture) and if you lower the gorge, the chest pocket should come down slightly giving it a good balance.

Regards,

/O
 

Encathol Epistemia

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Last Saturday I visited John Di Pietro to retrieve a navy velvet dinner jacket that I had commissioned in February. I had originally expected delivery rather sooner and occasions for slightly frequenter, but that's 2020 for you... bloody dreadful.

It's an unsubtle garment. The body is navy velvet while the lapels, pocket jets and cuffs are a slightly plusher black velvet. The buttons are covered in the same velvet as the lapels. I had trousers made with it in midnight blue gabardine with the waistband and pockets trimmed in the same black velvet as the lapels and the side seams trimmed with wide satin ribbons.

It was inspired by a picture from the vintage fashion illustrations on Mr. Di Pietro's wall. it's cut rather generously as Mr. Di Pietro was pessimistic about how readily the velvet would take the alteration and the direction that, 'the way that your body changes over time," tends to go. Besides that, it's a dinner jacket, so I intend to eat some large dinners while wearing it, making a generous cut practical.

Anyway, on with my standard photographic routine. This should be especially silly.

Navy Dinner Jacket Front B.JPG

The lapels are a full 5" wide and might qualify as Rubenesque. The cuffs are 3" wide. Also note that the chest pocket is jetted, like the hip pockets, rather than welted. This was the tailor's suggestion and something that he had done for me before.

The bowtie is also made of silk velvet. The tuxedo shirt was made for me by Ray Nepomuceno, a local shirtmaker, and the homburg by Stephen Temkin of Leon Drexler.

Navy Dinner Jacket Side.JPG

Not much to see here... well, there' a lot, but not much of interest. I suppose that the covered sleeve buttons merit a little note

Navy Dinner Jacket Back B.JPG

The rear view isn't very interesting either, but one might notice that the cuffs extend only over the front half of the end of the sleeves. This was because the tailor found it impractical to have the cuff encircle the whole sleeve as it would interfere with the point where the edges of the sleeve overlap and button closed. Most people will probably only be looking at the front of them anyway and if the party is any good, be too drunk to notice regardless.

Navy Dinner Jacket Flasher.JPG

Here I am practicing for my eventual debut on the local sex offender registry. I realize that I'm fully clothed in this, but, well, baby steps.

The cummerbund was made by Sam Hober, the studs long ago by Krementz and the braces by Albert Thurston. What they're ignominiously stretched over was made by generations of not having the good sense to decide against having children complimented by lots of cheese.

I don't think that I'll wear this often, in part because it's very bloody warm, but I assure you that I will take every opportunity to do so, no matter, or perhaps because, how much of a madman I might appear to the general public.
 

Wild Strawberry Rabbit

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Third fitting. The suit is almost ready, only trousers will be shortened (a little - 1cm or even less). There is also a minor issue with the right shoulder. I will wear the suit first a few times and if it will not dissapear then Dawid will correct it. Overall I’m happy with the outcome.
9C0B0642-26B3-4162-9C1B-6FFBF3B980F1.jpeg

847058F6-97D0-427D-A483-675A747DC806.jpeg

B6576924-83BF-4033-93A7-F6F135A610F4.jpeg
 

stuffedsuperdud

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Last Saturday I visited John Di Pietro to retrieve a navy velvet dinner jacket that I had commissioned in February. I had originally expected delivery rather sooner and occasions for slightly frequenter, but that's 2020 for you... bloody dreadful.

It's an unsubtle garment. The body is navy velvet while the lapels, pocket jets and cuffs are a slightly plusher black velvet. The buttons are covered in the same velvet as the lapels. I had trousers made with it in midnight blue gabardine with the waistband and pockets trimmed in the same black velvet as the lapels and the side seams trimmed with wide satin ribbons.

It was inspired by a picture from the vintage fashion illustrations on Mr. Di Pietro's wall. it's cut rather generously as Mr. Di Pietro was pessimistic about how readily the velvet would take the alteration and the direction that, 'the way that your body changes over time," tends to go. Besides that, it's a dinner jacket, so I intend to eat some large dinners while wearing it, making a generous cut practical.

Anyway, on with my standard photographic routine. This should be especially silly.

View attachment 1460575

The lapels are a full 5" wide and might qualify as Rubenesque. The cuffs are 3" wide. Also note that the chest pocket is jetted, like the hip pockets, rather than welted. This was the tailor's suggestion and something that he had done for me before.

The bowtie is also made of silk velvet. The tuxedo shirt was made for me by Ray Nepomuceno, a local shirtmaker, and the homburg by Stephen Temkin of Leon Drexler.

View attachment 1460576

Not much to see here... well, there' a lot, but not much of interest. I suppose that the covered sleeve buttons merit a little note

View attachment 1460573

The rear view isn't very interesting either, but one might notice that the cuffs extend only over the front half of the end of the sleeves. This was because the tailor found it impractical to have the cuff encircle the whole sleeve as it would interfere with the point where the edges of the sleeve overlap and button closed. Most people will probably only be looking at the front of them anyway and if the party is any good, be too drunk to notice regardless.

View attachment 1460574

Here I am practicing for my eventual debut on the local sex offender registry. I realize that I'm fully clothed in this, but, well, baby steps.

The cummerbund was made by Sam Hober, the studs long ago by Krementz and the braces by Albert Thurston. What they're ignominiously stretched over was made by generations of not having the good sense to decide against having children complimented by lots of cheese.

I don't think that I'll wear this often, in part because it's very bloody warm, but I assure you that I will take every opportunity to do so, no matter, or perhaps because, how much of a madman I might appear to the general public.
I've been awaiting this post with bated breath since you showed the pics from the earlier fitting. I'm not sure this is as outrageous in public as you might be concerned about? I mean, the lapels are pretty wild, but other than that, It's a dark blue dinner jacket. Seems quite wearable, well, assuming black tie survives COVID. Since it's a bit looser and more relaxed, might you be bold enough to wear this simply as a casual smoking jacket? Looking forward to action pics!
 

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