Ongoing Bespoke Projects

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Sander, Jul 15, 2014.

  1. lordsuperb

    lordsuperb Senior member

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    :butbut: shouldn't one who has years of studying have the tools to create something new and different?

    @greger what are your thoughts on the subject.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2015
  2. Gatsbyu

    Gatsbyu Senior member

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    If we cut both chest and shoulder on bias, it will make the shoulder part push "too much". On the contrary, The shoulder will be lost of support.

    This is one of the examples for effectively executed canvas (Thanks Jeffery again !):

    [​IMG]

    Chest is on straight while shoulder is on bias. Sorry that I am not good at explanation, so I suggest you to cross your arms and feel how your chest and shoulder muscle moves. You will have better idea why we need to cut it this way. It is natural for ordinary human.

    For forward pitched shoulders, we need to adjust the pattern (armhole width on the front scye, shoulder line, front syce of the sleeve) and canvas (more stretching for shoulder part, move the shoulder dart closer to armhole)
     
  3. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    I think I understand. Do you mean -- when you cut the chest straight, and the shoulder is on the bias, you get more movement in the shoulder because of the flexibility of the canvas?
     
  4. Gatsbyu

    Gatsbyu Senior member

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    Flexibility and comfort.

    See the muscle direction of deltoid and pectoralis major.
    [​IMG]

    Also, straight grain has an advantage over bias for stabilizing lapel rolling. Bias cut will need a more complicated pad stitching for the lapel in order to make it flat in the edge and rolling near the button stance.
     
  5. Darkside

    Darkside Senior member

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    I'm going to make sure my next tailor has a degree in kinesiology now.
     
  6. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    That makes sense about the shoulder. So, my understanding is that both A&S and Steed cut the chest on a bias. Edwin also told me that he terminates the canvas right before the lapel's break point, so that the jacket's outer shell can naturally roll. Apparently this is how he was taught at A&S. I never really quite understood that since the lapel feels like it has canvas inside. Or at least, it feels like every other lapel I've ever felt when I pinch it. Do you know what that's about?
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015
  7. Gatsbyu

    Gatsbyu Senior member

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    Better to make sure he/she also got a physics degree, idealy from MIT, in order to understand how gravity affects the fabric drape, how heat, moisture and stretching affects the canvas shaping.
     
  8. Gatsbyu

    Gatsbyu Senior member

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    If the canvas is extended to the break point, the area will have too much support and the roll can't fall naturally. Actually it is quite common to do it this way. British tailors like using silk clothes to cover the roll line to achieve a stronger but smooth rolling. Not sure if it is what you felt when pinching.
     
  9. Leaves

    Leaves Affiliate Vendor Affiliate Vendor

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    So I visited AW Bauer the other day. I actually pass AW Bauer every day on my way to work and I drop by sometimes for a chat and a coffee. AW Bauer has been in business for over 150 years. It is now owned by Frederik Andersen (cutter) and Martin Ekolin (tailor) after the old cutter/owner Börje retired last year (Börje is in his mid-70's, he had been at BAuer since his early teens). There are 7 people working at Bauer. I have previously commissioned and navy double breasted suit - which is my go to suit whenever I need a navy DB - and I also have a sport's coat from them. I recently got measured up for a new navy suit (I lost a few kilos so Frederik wanted to make sure he got everything right from the beginning). I did make a short video when Frederik is cutting a pair of trousers but I fudged something up when I was trying to upload it to Youtube. So here's a short video they made themselves from their workshop. I'll ask EFV to tag along for my first fitting.

    EDIT: I actually managed to upload my video, here it is. I made a newbie mistake and shot the video in an upright position though. :embar:

    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]

    Their own video:

    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2015
  10. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Senior member

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    Don't think I ever realized how big shears were.
     
  11. FlyingMonkey

    FlyingMonkey Senior member

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    I visited my tailors (Cad and the Dandy) today and picked up the trousers for my blazer suit made from the famous custom tobacco fresco. I got the jacket a while back but the trousers had needed some further adjustment and it had been a while since I was in the UK.

    I also had a second fitting for the 3-piece I am having made in a rather nice pinstripe mid-grey flannel from Holland & Sherry that I picked up on ebay. I wanted this with a bit more body than I normally like my suits - there's something about flannel that seems to demand that - but it needed a bit more shaping and a few other tweaks. I should be able to collect the finished suit next week before I fly back to Canada but I probably won't be wearing it for a couple of months at least because it's a little too warm for early autumn.
     
  12. Newcomer

    Newcomer Senior member

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    Can I see your Cad and the Dandy stuff FM? Just curious.
     
  13. greger

    greger Senior member

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    Yes, this is true. But, tailoring is also an art, so no copying. Nobody owns a style. Never copy to closely somebody else variation. And why would you want to.

    So many tailors, it seems, have been taught to make or develop a house style. Which isn't wrong up to a point. Clothes do change from time to time and the tailor needs to be relevant. For example, who wears frock coats to work. They were replaced by the lowly lounge and reefer. None of the tailors today were part of the changes. The old tailors knew how to change. Do the present day tailors know how to do that. It seems like many of these today are turning down some modern day clothes, whereas tailors of the past stayed relevant, such as making all the clothes men and boys wore. Big city tailors could be picky.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2015
  14. greger

    greger Senior member

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    There is some confusion about the canvases. The main canvas is from the shoulder to the bottom of the coat, and from the underarm dart to clear across the lapel. Some tailors won't take the canvas clear to the bottom, but almost, with heavier cloths, because, it would interfere with their art. Another canvas is for the chest area. Most probably add a canvas in the shoulder. And some even have more canvases. Most places where the pad stitching is a couple of layers of canvas. The exception is the lapel of one layer of canvas padded to the coat cloth. Sometimes pocketing is slipped between the layers to make the roll firmer. Another single layer of canvas is the collar padded to felt or melton, which is woven cloth that has been felted (probably by boiling). Melton/felt don't unravel so the collar edge can be thinner. Later the top collar is put on the collar. Also, pocketing is slipped into parts of the collar for added support at the ends.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2015
  15. David Reeves

    David Reeves Affiliate Vendor Affiliate Vendor

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    I got my burgundy suit for fall. waiting on the lilac velvet DB and off white three piece moleskin. Decided to give the ink flannel DB suit a miss a couple of clients have got that on order so I can enjoy vicariously.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

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