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dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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The whole jacket looks a bit tight. Maybe also a bit short. I would just bring it up to him at a fitting.

Did you specify anything at the fittings, or just let him do his thing?
 

MCBC1

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The whole jacket looks a bit tight. Maybe also a bit short. I would just bring it up to him at a fitting.

Did you specify anything at the fittings, or just let him do his thing?
For the most part I let him do his thing but I did request during each fitting that the jacket be roomier and longer but perhaps was not clear enough. Tbh I thought I remember the jacket being longer and less tight during the last fitting (haven’t gained any lbs either) - but I guess I should have tracked this with pics.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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For the most part I let him do his thing but I did request during each fitting that the jacket be roomier and longer but perhaps was not clear enough. Tbh I thought I remember the jacket being longer and less tight during the last fitting (haven’t gained any lbs either) - but I guess I should have tracked this with pics.
Damn, I have to admit that's a bit worrisome since I have two jackets on order (also my first order).

I would just let him know. Maybe he can let out some parts. I would personally ask him to address the back, let out the waist, and see if he can't give you a bit more length. Sleeves also look a bit tight and maybe pitched incorrectly.

I just saw a new Solito tweed on Nicholas Templeman and thought he looked terrific in it. FWIW, it didn't look short or tight at all -- fairly nice and traditional in terms of Italian style.
 

SeamasterLux

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That back looks really well done...
They definitely nailed it

Seamaster Lux's example reflects my recent experience with WW Chan. They listened to what I wanted and got the specs right at the first fitting, including a clean back. It was a pleasurable experience. I must say WWC has become a crack unit compared to when they did my first suit years back.
I’ve always been positively surprised by the outcome with them, even with my first suit 5 years ago.

I am curious on how you’d compare WW Chan to Stark & Sons.

thanks
That’s a tough one. Different style with more structure on Stark side, better finishing even if WW Chan has a good one. And Chan is full bespoke so possibilities are relatively infinite. I like both but would tend to prefer the shoulder on WWChan for myself. That’s purely personal. Both are high grade products
 

Alan Bee

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Hi All - Here’s a jacket I’ve received from Solito. It’s my first jacket from Solito in a 11 oz cashmere from Loro Piana. Would appreciate other folks’ views.

My initial observations in fit is that the back is a bit tight and I think this is noticeable in pulling along the back seam along with a roll below the collar. Jacket needs to be pressed as it was mailed so please take that into account.

View attachment 1291831
@MCBC1

I think Derek @dieworkwear is being too polite. This is simply unacceptable, no less from a tailor with the reputation of Solito.

I would take it back and ask him to start all over. The cutting is awful. I don’t even know where to begin. The arms are too tight, the jacket looks like a burrito wrap, too short etc. It’s all just wrong to my eyes ...

I’m built exactly like you (extreme drop) so I know a thing or two about fitting and cutting for guys like us.

Alan Bee
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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I would take it back and ask him to start all over. The cutting is awful. I don’t even know where to begin. The arms are too tight, the jacket looks like a burrito wrap, too short etc. It’s all just wrong to my eyes ...
Why would you not just ask the tailor how to figure out how to get to the point where you want to arrive?
 

Alan Bee

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Why would you not just ask the tailor how to figure out how to get to the point where you want to arrive?
@dieworkwear

Jeezus Derek, the work of a tailor is to take measurements, visualize the clients body, and cut the garment accordingly. I highly doubt the client @MCBC1 asked for a burrito wrap.

Please stop glossing over with nice words what is a clear FAIL on the part of the tailor. That coat needs to be recut completely. There’s no amount of letting out here and there that can fix this.

Alan Bee
 

VRaivio

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@SeamasterLux , I'm curious, after many years of having things made, how do you store all those valuable jackets and suits and coats and such? A second apartment for them?
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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@dieworkwear

Jeezus Derek, the work of a tailor is to take measurements, visualize the clients body, and cut the garment accordingly. I highly doubt the client @MCBC1 asked for a burrito wrap.

Please stop glossing over with nice words what is a clear FAIL on the part of the tailor. They coat need to be recut completely. There’s no amount of letting out here and there that can fix this.

Alan Bee
Man, you are a really high strung and strident dude. I can't imagine what it would be like working for you as a tailor.
 

Alan Bee

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Man, you are a really high strung and strident dude. I can't imagine what it would be like working for you as a tailor.
Or working for me an an “anything” for that matter.

Look Derek, that coat is wrong. It’s as simple as that. If you choose to butter up the OP so as not to make him feel so bad, that’s your choice.

Alan
 

dieworkwear

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Or working for me an an “anything” for that matter.

Look Derek, that coat is wrong. It’s as simple as that. If you choose to butter up the OP so as not to make him feel so bad, that’s your choice.

Alan
I don't understand how you affect this totally formal gentleman manner of speaking, but fail to be a nice person online, which is presumably the entire point of that gentleman ethos.

The man paid good money for the coat. It doesn't fit very well. His tailor probably knows a little more about tailoring than you, and if not, it wouldn't matter anyway because his hands are the ones that are going to touch that coat. Be a nice person and try to help the person without making them feel bad, and allow those two people to figure out a way to best resolve those issues.

In the end, a lot of bespoke goes wrong, unfortunately. Sometimes you have to walk away. There's no reason to make anyone feel bad about it.
 

Alan Bee

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I don't understand how you affect this totally formal gentleman manner of speaking, but fail to be a nice person online, which is presumably the entire point of that gentleman ethos.

The man paid good money for the coat. It doesn't fit very well. His tailor probably knows a little more about tailoring than you, and if not, it wouldn't matter anyway because his hands are the ones that are going to touch that coat. Be a nice person and try to help the person without making them feel bad, and allow those two people to figure out a way to best resolve those issues.

In the end, a lot of bespoke goes wrong, unfortunately. Sometimes you have to walk away. There's no reason to make anyone feel bad about it.
Derek, please let’s get back to clothes and leave character aside. You don’t know me besides my opinion on clothes. And the reverse is also true.

We come here for feedback and I’ve offered mine. If you chose to do so with velvet gloves that your prerogative. But don’t conclude someone’s a monster because they chose a manner of expression quite different from yours.

Alan
 

ThePetros

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Derek, please let’s get back to clothes and leave character aside. You don’t know me besides my opinion on clothes. And the reverse is also true.

We come here for feedback and I’ve offered mine. If you chose to do so with velvet gloves that your prerogative. But don’t conclude someone’s a monster because they chose a manner of expression quite different from yours.

Alan
I'm with Alan on this one. I recently had a similar suit problem (coincidentally with a Loro fabric as well). It's a tough fabric to work with. And even tougher if the suit is even a centimeter too snug. You will look like a hot dog bursting out of its skin.

I totally understand why we should probably be gentlemanly - but we are often blind to our own commissions and can't articulate what has gone wrong (other than that we are no happy with the result). Personally, I would err on the side of being grouchy to make sure you are pleased with the result rather than be gentlemanly.

The tailor should, of course, know how to fix the man's jacket. But it is the forum's job to explain what needs to be done and be honest that what he delivered there is unacceptable. The tone is irrelevant to that advise.
 

dieworkwear

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I'm with Alan on this one. I recently had a similar suit problem (coincidentally with a Loro fabric as well). It's a tough fabric to work with. And even tougher if the suit is even a centimeter too snug. You will look like a hot dog bursting out of its skin.

I totally understand why we should probably be gentlemanly - but we are often blind to our own commissions and can't articulate what has gone wrong (other than that we are no happy with the result). Personally, I would err on the side of being grouchy to make sure you are pleased with the result rather than be gentlemanly.

The tailor should, of course, know how to fix the man's jacket. But it is the forum's job to explain what needs to be done and be honest that what he delivered there is unacceptable. The tone is irrelevant to that advise.

IMO, if you have to work with a tailor or shoemaker for a long time, you don't want to be that kind of dude who's super strident, annoying, or an otherwise strange human being. Maybe you'll still get top quality product, but 1) people will gossip about you and 2) you will be an annoying person, which is itself its own cost. You have to work with these people for a while -- why go into it with that kind of "let me speak to your manager" type attitude? (Granted, I realize my posts here are annoying in their own way, but I try to be a little nicer to people I have to work with).

Sometimes things don't go well and you have to be more strident. Or things don't work out at all and you have to walk away. I've had commissions go wrong and just stopped using a tailor. I had one commission that went so wrong, I demanded a refund. But you know ... ease into it.

I don't think tone is irrelevant at all on the forum. For one, it creates a toxic culture when people are super strident and argumentative. It's one of the reasons why some older members left (as they've told me directly). And the forum is worse off without their contributions. Second, it dissuades new people from posting (again, as told to me by more than a few lurkers). And third, you know, it's just unpleasant. You can convey the same information without being strident and bombastic.

On the issue of advice, irrelevant of tone, I don't think it's necessary to demand a remake. If the tailor isn't any good, a remake is not going to get you to your end goal. If the tailor is good, then he or she will figure out how to fix these issues. It does help to bring up the things you see wrong, but I wouldn't go into this demanding a remake.
 
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