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On ‘over-dressing’

Mr Tickle

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In which way? I honestly don't care just don't want fundamental decency to decay further. No small businesses, cities in ruin, vagrants, crumbling infrastructure, more suburban sprawl cutting into relatively preserved nature, loss of mens dress. It gets really bland.
Change doesn't always have to mean rot and decay - if managed well!
Loss of men's dress is a process that's been going on for at least 50 years and is more to do with the ongoing casualization of society than WFH, I think. There was quite a lot of "blandness" about the old order, too, where there were strict codes and expectations around how people dressed, that were often dictated by class/gender, and were difficult to break out of.
 

PSNY

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That is true, but there is nothing wrong with that, there are classes and will always be, casual clothing does not ablate ones socioeconomic class or even ones rank at work, in fact, the visual differences are even more exacerbated in certain circumstances e.g., brand insignia, accessories, and so on. Example: the CEO can wears jeans and t-shirt as can the new hires out college, but the CEO will be accessorizing with a with a Patek Philipe worth 10 years post-tax salary of the new hire.
 

comrade

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That is true, but there is nothing wrong with that, there are classes and will always be, casual clothing does not ablate ones socioeconomic class or even ones rank at work, in fact, the visual differences are even more exacerbated in certain circumstances e.g., brand insignia, accessories, and so on. Example: the CEO can wears jeans and t-shirt as can the new hires out college, but the CEO will be accessorizing with a with a Patek Philipe worth 10 years post-tax salary of the new hire.
However if the boss is a "tech bro" it is more likely that he'll wear
and Apple Watch. No particular love for "obsolete technology" no
matter how extraordinary the elaboration. Personally, I love
beautiful mechanical watches and I own a vintage entry level
luxury watch.
 

WatchmeWhipWatchmena

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Does that actually happen? I thought most places still expected a suit for interviews, even if that is not the everyday dress that people wear to work there. My company is business casual (almost nobody in sportcoats even) but we still expect interviewees to wear a suit and tie. It's been the same everywhere I have worked.
Happened to me. Luckily work at a place where you see wide range of dress codes. From suits to pure lazyiness. One of the guys said "dressed smart again" and said I can dress down and don't need to come in with a suit everyday. Will still turnup smart regardless. I could make a joke and say "Ah well, I threw out all my casual clothes", but then I'd look like a right douche. They'll get the message sooner or later.
 

Beadhead

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How is this different than not wanting to dress formally in non-formal environments? If you like wearing a dinner jacket, then you shouldn't--at least by your logic--care what others think; you should wear a dinner jacket whenever you like. You shouldn't care that there is a silly old rule saying that you shouldn't wear a dinner jacket before 6 pm, or before dark.

I think the rule that you shouldn't wear a dinner jacket before the evening is (roughly) parallel to the norm that your dress should be appropriate to your environment. Both are about dressing appropriately relative to one's environment. You would feel out of place wearing a tux at 9 am, and other people would feel out of place wearing a suit to work.

It might not be so much about what others think, as about what you think. That is, you might not care that others would find it odd to catch you in a tux in the morning, but you might feel inappropriate wearing one in the morning nonetheless. Similarly, the person who doesn't wear a suit to work, might not care that others would judge him for wearing a suit (although perhaps he does); he might just feel wrong wearing a suit in an environment where everyone else is wearing jeans regardless of what they think.

If you feel the pull of one of these norms, i.e. either not wearing eveningwear prior to the evening or not dressing formally in casual environments, I think you ought to be sympathetic to people who feel the pull of the other one of these norms. I am not saying that anyone has to or should follow either of these norms, but I think there are very good reasons for following both of them. Dinner jackets are designed to look good in less bright environments, and suits look better in a museum than in a Walmart.

I don't really care too much what others think and fortunately the sort of clothing I like to wear doesn't look too out of place in my environment. However, I am sympathetic to someone who feels like he can't wear tailoring anywhere. The problem is likely not just that the person fears standing out; the problem is likely that the person wants to live some sort of cultured elegant lifestyle that isn't really available where he lives. He wants to live the sort of life or be in the sort of environment where he can where a suit not just because he wnats to wear a suit, but also because he likes inhabiting those sorts of environments. This isn't something one can get over simply by putting on a suit.
There's a reason they are called "evening clothes" and "day suits".
 
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Beadhead

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Actually people do care what others wear. Not everyone of course, but some. Those who are into fashion, style, dressing well, or whatever you want to call it, observe what others are wearing. I know I do. I am quite certain this falls into the category of caring what others wear.
Don't forget there are also those have no manners. Negative comments on other's dress are always rude.
 

Beadhead

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Your clothes dictate your status and how other people receive who you are. I am in the tailoring business and wear a suit every day because you never know who you are going to see. Always need to look smart and "in the business!"
Many years ago I had an uncle who was a patient in a large hospital in Leeds England. I used to visit him almost every day on my way home from work. When I walked into the hospital building, crowds of other visitors used to part to let me through to the lifts. They thought I was a medical consultant instead of being just a humble tailor.
Medical consultants are a dime a dozen. Now, a good tailor ...
 

Beadhead

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I can think of a couple of clubs where the clientele wear black leather vests and hot pants, studded leather biker caps and 70s-style mustaches. Also very exclusive. Should an invitation to join here also change my worldview?
No, but your attendance might.
 

WatchmeWhipWatchmena

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I think when it comes to dressing up, there's a few pros and cons to this....
Pros of Over-Dressing:

  1. Professionalism and Respect: Over-dressing can be seen as a sign of professionalism and respect, particularly in formal or business settings. It demonstrates attention to detail and a desire to present oneself in the best possible light, which can leave a positive impression on others.
  2. Self-Expression: Over-dressing allows individuals to express their personal style and creativity. It can be a form of self-expression and an opportunity to showcase one's individuality and unique fashion sense.
  3. Confidence Boost: Dressing up more formally than required can boost one's confidence. When people feel well-dressed and put together, it often translates into a sense of self-assurance and can positively impact their interactions and overall demeanor.
  4. Special Occasions: Over-dressing can be appropriate and appreciated in certain special occasions, such as weddings, galas, or upscale events. It demonstrates a level of respect for the significance of the event and can enhance the celebratory atmosphere.
Cons of Over-Dressing:

  1. Barrier and Discomfort: Over-dressing can create a barrier between the individual and their surroundings. In casual or informal settings, it may make others feel uncomfortable or intimidated, potentially hindering natural social interactions and creating a sense of disconnect.
  2. Misjudgment and Perception: Over-dressing can lead others to form assumptions or judgments about an individual. They may be perceived as trying too hard, seeking attention, or being out of touch with the event or environment. This can impact the way others perceive and interact with them.
  3. Cost and Practicality: Over-dressing is often associated with more expensive or formal attire, which may not be practical or feasible for everyone. It can create financial pressure or make individuals feel excluded if they cannot afford or access the required clothing, further exacerbating social inequalities.
  4. Inappropriate for the Occasion: Over-dressing can be seen as inappropriate if it does not align with the dress code or context of the event. It may make the individual stand out in an uncomfortable way, drawing unnecessary attention or detracting from the intended atmosphere of the occasion.


Sometimes on the situations I overdressed, it looks comical.. A young man, wearing a double breasted navy chalkstriped suit, introducing themselves to people at work who are just wearing slacks and a shirt, or even super casual clothes lol. It did help my confidence though!

I cannot agree with that statement enough of "if your clothes are too expensive that prevents you from acting in a particular activity, then you're probably overdressing". The quote you could have just used is this:

Hardy Amie's said, “a man should look as if he bought his clothes with intelligence, put them on with care and then forgot all about them”.

I would love to wear suits to nightclubs and such, but these are just not practical garments in todays age really socially speaking. I still think its perfectly acceptable to wear if you're out on your day and going for a stroll or for an office job. May look overkill, but whatever anyone is thinking, they're probably just thinking "oh he's going somewhere important" or "he's got a big day".

Dress up where you can get away with it. Now given my very casual attitude, I do think people like me more once they realise that I don't have an arrogant attitude when conversing. They probably expect me to be all super duper formal in my tone, and well I still speak like anyone of my age would. So they can relate to me, but also feel special in my pressence.
So I do think dressing up still has a part to play and even over-dressing if you enjoy it. Don't let someones personal choices in their clothing affect you into thinking you're just being the weird one out.
Also in the age of working from home, in my experience, I do try to dress up as much as I can get away with it. There's no way I'm letting all my clothes get covered in dust, just because I can get away with jeans and a t shirt.

One piece I'm looking to get is unstructured washable jacket, so I can go to social events with it and not worry about it getting stains or god knows what on it. I personally think unstructured suits are absolutely underrated.
They'd be great for literally anything. From nightclubs, to sitting on the park, to going to the office. All while looking swish!
 

Beadhead

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Happened to me. Luckily work at a place where you see wide range of dress codes. From suits to pure lazyiness. One of the guys said "dressed smart again" and said I can dress down and don't need to come in with a suit everyday. Will still turnup smart regardless. I could make a joke and say "Ah well, I threw out all my casual clothes", but then I'd look like a right douche. They'll get the message sooner or later.
Should have said, "Well, it beats dressing dumb."
 

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