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OFFICIAL THREAD: General Cookery and Discussion

Piobaire

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Tried Kenji's quick mac and cheese tonight. High walled saute pan, pasta shells barely covered with water, boil until most water gone and shells are soft. Toss in some evaporated milk, squirt of Dijon mustard, cayenne pepper, S&P, and ounces of the shredded, meltable cheese you want. Lower heat immediately, stir until cheese is melted and sauce thickened, enjoy. I baked off a bunch of broccoli and stirred in thinking the florets would soak up the sauce...they did.

Next time I make it I'll butter toast panko crumbs to sprinkle on top.
 

double00

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not my usual threak but i'll ask anyways, do folks warm their plates before serving? i've noticed - especially with things like eggs - the plate will pull heat out of the food a bit quickly.

we don't have a microwave, i'm thinking just a nice hot soak and dry off before serving food?
 

cb200

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I'll "charge" my plates sometimes. It depends what it is. If there's anything like a butter based sauce yes. Beurre Blanc or a pasta dish with butter I'll normally do that.... but, I don't know if there's a hard and fast rule for me. Sometimes a soak and a dry sometimes just pop it in the oven on low for a bit.
 

Piobaire

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Our plates are heavy, industry grade china and I'll pop them into a 180 oven if I feel the need.
 

otc

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My dad very much dislikes eating food that isn't still hot and thus favors warm plates for pretty much everything.

Their old oven vented from the rear almost directly at one of the back burners--you could just stick a stack of plates there and they would end up warm (if a bit uneven...). Convenient if you are already using the oven.

I think if I had one of those split ovens, I would always use the second space at a low temp to warm plates if I remembered. It is better for pretty much every dish...
 

nootje

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Key thing to remember is that it’s very lean, tender meat. So cooking it whole will dry it out in a heartbeat if you’re not careful. Also, it can be gamey in its flavor, although not as much as say hare. Sauce can be nice to have.

That said, I do love me a pheasant. Preferably first high up in the air, then on a plate. Wrap the legs with bacon,put a good chunk of butter in the cavity, and some butter on top of it, or even better butter the whole thing up. Tie up the legs. Usually an hour on 170 degrees Celsius should have it cooked. Make sure to check very regularly and put juice back on top to keep it from drying out. Use seasoning as preferred.

Use those sweet sweet juices for a sauce. A cognac or Armagnac based one are best, but sweet sauces also work well.

If you’re up for it, take out the breast and legs after cooking and use the carcass for stock. Shame to waste it.

And the feathers do nicely on a hat and in flower bouquets, but I suspect it came to you already undressed 😉
 

Milksteakboiledhard

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Key thing to remember is that it’s very lean, tender meat. So cooking it whole will dry it out in a heartbeat if you’re not careful. Also, it can be gamey in its flavor, although not as much as say hare. Sauce can be nice to have.

That said, I do love me a pheasant. Preferably first high up in the air, then on a plate. Wrap the legs with bacon,put a good chunk of butter in the cavity, and some butter on top of it, or even better butter the whole thing up. Tie up the legs. Usually an hour on 170 degrees Celsius should have it cooked. Make sure to check very regularly and put juice back on top to keep it from drying out. Use seasoning as preferred.

Use those sweet sweet juices for a sauce. A cognac or Armagnac based one are best, but sweet sauces also work well.

If you’re up for it, take out the breast and legs after cooking and use the carcass for stock. Shame to waste it.

And the feathers do nicely on a hat and in flower bouquets, but I suspect it came to you already undressed 😉
I wrapped the bird in bacon and roasted it for 45-50 minutes at 350F, then let it rest for 10 minutes in the oven. I paired it with a mushroom and carrot based shepherd's. For season, just salt and pepper. I did place some diced onion and orange segments under the carcass like my mother always did (I doubt it did anything).

Turned out well, thanks for the advice. I'll be sure to make a pan sauce with the other bird I have vacuum sealed in the freezer. I was lucky to eat the side that didn't get blasted with 12 gauge shot.
 

quigleysr

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I grew up eating “fettuccine carbonara” which for my non-Italian family meant bacon, Kraft green jar of parm, and huge leaves of parsley. And I loved it.

Tonight was my first attempt at traditional carbonara. Guanciale from a friend breaking into charcuterie. Bucatini. Fresh parm and pecorino. Not bad but way too much salt.
F2BACA8D-4749-461F-AEFA-F38801D03D01.jpeg
 

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