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Official: STAR WARS THREAD. These are the droids you're looking for. **WARNING MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS

Omega Male

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... and I still think it's great ...
1000001736-gif.2187293
 

hpreston

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Initial reactions to the first few episode of The Acolyte are coming out, so far pretty positive.


I for one am looking forward it. While still holding out, that is could Mando Season 1 (👍👍), or Book of Boba Fett (👎👎)

Interest further piqued by this: "No one is good, no one is bad, anyone can live, anyone can die, it’s just a cool story anyone can jump right into."
 

SixOhNine

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“I was the one who really knew what Star Wars was…who actually knew this world, because there’s a lot to it. The Force, for example, nobody understood the Force,” Lucas told French publication Brut in an interview at the Cannes Film Festival. “When they started other ones after I sold the company, a lot of the ideas that were in [the original] sort of got lost."

Oh, f*ck all the way off. No one understood it because it was some half-assed mumbo jumbo you made up back in the 70s, not some detailed world building. Then you changed the "ideas" of Star Wars every time a new whim hit, forcing everyone around you to backfill excuses and explanations. Go count your billions and shut the hell up.
 

Gibonius

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“I was the one who really knew what Star Wars was…who actually knew this world, because there’s a lot to it. The Force, for example, nobody understood the Force,” Lucas told French publication Brut in an interview at the Cannes Film Festival. “When they started other ones after I sold the company, a lot of the ideas that were in [the original] sort of got lost."

Oh, f*ck all the way off. No one understood it because it was some half-assed mumbo jumbo you made up back in the 70s, not some detailed world building. Then you changed the "ideas" of Star Wars every time a new whim hit, forcing everyone around you to backfill excuses and explanations. Go count your billions and shut the hell up.

The guy who decided quantify midichlorians was good worldbuilding is going to lecture other moviemakers about not understanding the Force. Sigh.
 

otc

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Also having a brother and sister making out like they were lovers wasn't really good world building either...
Or it was expert level misdirection!

OK not really...but they had no reason to believe they were related at that point...and she mostly just kisses him to annoy Han
 

Jr Mouse

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Lucas was making most of it up as he went along making the films. Which is fine considering how great the OT turned out.
 

classicalthunde

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Lucas was making most of it up as he went along making the films. Which is fine considering how great the OT turned out.

SW continuity and retcon debacles aside, I think we often malign as 'making it up as you go' as being inherently worse than having it all planned out from the get go but there are plenty of examples where writing as you go works out great (Breaking Bad) and other examples of where pre-planned plots fall apart pretty fast (Game of Thrones).
 

Jr Mouse

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SW continuity and retcon debacles aside, I think we often malign as 'making it up as you go' as being inherently worse than having it all planned out from the get go but there are plenty of examples where writing as you go works out great (Breaking Bad) and other examples of where pre-planned plots fall apart pretty fast (Game of Thrones).

100% agreed.
 

SixOhNine

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GOT isn't a great example of that. The show ran out of source material around seasons 5-6, depending on specific storyline. In theory, the showrunners got a broad overview of the plan from the author, but considering his initial pitch to the publisher was for a trilogy where Jon Snow married Arya Stark and became king, that's not worth a lot.

They very much were making it up as they went for the last couple of years.
 

beargonefishing

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GOT isn't a great example of that. The show ran out of source material around seasons 5-6, depending on specific storyline. In theory, the showrunners got a broad overview of the plan from the author, but considering his initial pitch to the publisher was for a trilogy where Jon Snow married Arya Stark and became king, that's not worth a lot.

They very much were making it up as they went for the last couple of years.

Tbf I don't think GRRM has any idea what to do with the story either.
 

hpreston

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I think these opening paragraphs of The Digital it’s review of the Andor Blu Ray sum up my feelings than I ever could.

As the franchise’s very first target audience, Generation X tends to have a complicated relationship with Star Wars. Though an instant classic upon its debut in 1977, George Lucas’ original installment is often dismissed as a children’s film. But that description simply doesn’t bear scrutiny. Sure, its archetypal “hero’s journey” was inspired by Flash Gordon matinee serials, and two of its central characters were intended as bumbling comic relief. But the film’s young protagonist experiences the murder of both his adopted parents and his newfound mentor, even as its female lead endures torture. An entire planet’s worth of innocent living beings are wiped out in a casual but calculated act of genocide, and the film’s anti-hero shoots a man in cold blood in an obvious kill-or-be-killed situation. These are hardly the hijinks of the Apple Dumpling Gang.

After a thrilling climax—and three years of waiting virtually in the dark—Irvin Kershner’s 1980 sequel, The Empire Strikes Back, proved an even darker experience as the Empire’s retribution came swiftly. Mysteries were revealed and an unlikely romance blossomed, but the film’s heroes essentially had their asses handed to them from start to finish. A beloved character was captured, fate unknown. The young protagonist gained new wisdom, but also uncovered a terrible secret: the architect of all his misery—the man who’d just cut off his hand—was his own father. This was followed by yet another three year wait for the audience to find resolution. Now... none of this was exactly grindhouse material or otherwise hard boiled. Both films delivered adventure and wide-eyed wonder; they were just plain fun. But to call Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back childish is a misnomer. It would be more accurate to say that they were made for the child in everyone, a fact borne out by the broad demographics of the eager theatergoers who lined up in droves to see them.

But here’s the thing: implicit in the progression from that first film to the second was the promise that the Star Wars franchise would continue to grow in complexity and maturity with its audience. Yet that didn’t happen. Richard Marquand’s Return of the Jedi in 1983 was a regression on every front. In 1997, Lucas proved that he’d failed to understand his creation in the same way his audience did by blunting all three films for his cherished Special Editions.

Now though, I’ve got my own youngling and Ive enjoyed watching him get into Star Wars. He’s definitely got his own opinions and has liked some of the movies and show better than others… but overall he’s enjoyed most of this new era of Star Wars, that in and of itself it fun to watch.
 

smittycl

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I think these opening paragraphs of The Digital it’s review of the Andor Blu Ray sum up my feelings than I ever could.

As the franchise’s very first target audience, Generation X tends to have a complicated relationship with Star Wars. Though an instant classic upon its debut in 1977, George Lucas’ original installment is often dismissed as a children’s film. But that description simply doesn’t bear scrutiny. Sure, its archetypal “hero’s journey” was inspired by Flash Gordon matinee serials, and two of its central characters were intended as bumbling comic relief. But the film’s young protagonist experiences the murder of both his adopted parents and his newfound mentor, even as its female lead endures torture. An entire planet’s worth of innocent living beings are wiped out in a casual but calculated act of genocide, and the film’s anti-hero shoots a man in cold blood in an obvious kill-or-be-killed situation. These are hardly the hijinks of the Apple Dumpling Gang.

After a thrilling climax—and three years of waiting virtually in the dark—Irvin Kershner’s 1980 sequel, The Empire Strikes Back, proved an even darker experience as the Empire’s retribution came swiftly. Mysteries were revealed and an unlikely romance blossomed, but the film’s heroes essentially had their asses handed to them from start to finish. A beloved character was captured, fate unknown. The young protagonist gained new wisdom, but also uncovered a terrible secret: the architect of all his misery—the man who’d just cut off his hand—was his own father. This was followed by yet another three year wait for the audience to find resolution. Now... none of this was exactly grindhouse material or otherwise hard boiled. Both films delivered adventure and wide-eyed wonder; they were just plain fun. But to call Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back childish is a misnomer. It would be more accurate to say that they were made for the child in everyone, a fact borne out by the broad demographics of the eager theatergoers who lined up in droves to see them.

But here’s the thing: implicit in the progression from that first film to the second was the promise that the Star Wars franchise would continue to grow in complexity and maturity with its audience. Yet that didn’t happen. Richard Marquand’s Return of the Jedi in 1983 was a regression on every front. In 1997, Lucas proved that he’d failed to understand his creation in the same way his audience did by blunting all three films for his cherished Special Editions.

Now though, I’ve got my own youngling and Ive enjoyed watching him get into Star Wars. He’s definitely got his own opinions and has liked some of the movies and show better than others… but overall he’s enjoyed most of this new era of Star Wars, that in and of itself it fun to watch.
Wow, that was a superb analysis. I took my son to the Special Editions when they were released just before the Prequels. He was fairly young and I had to sit sideways with my leg over the edge of his seat as it kept folding him up. Luckily he cemented on the originals and we discussed the drawbacks of the Special Editions (mostly while the Death Star attack was a bit better Han clearly shot first).

He liked the prequels but though Jar Jar and some of the other cutesy stuff was nonsensical.

He still refuses to see anything by Rian Johnson after the Last Jedi debacle.
 

Jr Mouse

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She’s right.

 

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