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Austinjhutch

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Just chiming in on UM; stumbled on to them slashing Alden prices Sunday AM and immediately picked up a pair of color 8 lw bluchers at 30% off, which even at that discount was super surprising since Aldens were obviously always excluded from site-wide discounts. Came over here Monday AM, saw a few posts alluding to their insolvency and sure enough somehow they'd advanced in one day to 50% off everything and store was basically cleaned out. Sad sight, definitely bought some of my "firsts" there over the last 10ish years, and yeah when it was still a relevant shop they always had a solid potpourri of assorted brands and were usually good for a few nice pickups here and there. Besides that unavoidable shipping fee, which they maintained until the very end, they'd cut some good deals for sure. But man their $10 shipping had to be the slowest of any paid domestic shipping, like for a while there in 2010-2012 you could get your order twice as fast from European merchants like tres bien while waiting 7-8 days for a few sweaters from UM. Anyway, totally thought they were gonna bail on those aldens I bought on Sunday, but they did end up filling the order and shoes will get to Brooklyn sometime next week. Man, such a funny feeling when you're browsing like 4-5 different shell aldens on clearance and in stock in sz 11s and 12s and its like youre in that raymond carver short story about the sad man having a yard sale.
 

justsayno

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And the retailpocalypse in SF continues. It hit home the hardest when the Ralph Lauren shop downtown closed. That was the place to peruse RRL and purple label goods in person.
 

noob in 89

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It hit home the hardest when the Ralph Lauren shop downtown closed. That was the place to peruse RRL and purple label goods in person.
I wonder if interest in those brands is declining. Going by eBay completed auctions, RRL and Purple Label are fetching way less than they used to compared to a few years ago.
 

gfmozart

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Back when they had decent stuff, I couldn’t get UM to ship to my location. And gradually the buys became really off. Not weird or unwearable but just plain Low risk clones which doesn’t spark any interest whatsoever. The website was horrible imho.
 

OccultaVexillum

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I wonder if interest in those brands is declining. Going by eBay completed auctions, RRL and Purple Label are fetching way less than they used to compared to a few years ago.
Resell value on every designer has greatly descreased in the last 5 years, with a few exceptions.
When Grailed first started you could usually resell things and at least break even. It’s pretty much a guaranteed loss now.
 

Zamb

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Resell value on every designer has greatly descreased in the last 5 years, with a few exceptions.
When Grailed first started you could usually resell things and at least break even. It’s pretty much a guaranteed loss now.
I argued very early on that the second hand market was going to screw up a lot of stores and brands, and it has.
There was a time when it was fun to resell things on places like SZ, here on Styleforum etc. There were like minded people who appreciated similar things and you could either trade of sell things to people who appreciated them.

With the rise of grailed, and a ton of facebook groups to resell stuff it has become a race to the bottom. Lowballers are out left right and center, wanting something for nothing. As a matter of personal principle I don't have a grailed account and will never have one. I see a lot of designers working with them, I NEVER will. I see stores and store owners collaborating with them and I think its just really stupid.
The whole resale market and the ability to rent designer clothing from places like rent the runway is a part of the reason why a lot of stores and designers are struggling. After all, why would people buy new goods if they can find decent used ones for sometimes less than half off?
Why would you buy even on sale when in a few months its possible for the item to pop up for cheap?
I also want to make it clear I have nothing personal against the owners of grailed, I met them early on as they were supportive of my work and they were nice guys, but...…………. I detest what the company represents and think its (and similar entities) are bad for stores and designers in the long run.
 

gfmozart

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I argued very early on that the second hand market was going to screw up a lot of stores and brands, and it has.
There was a time when it was fun to resell things on places like SZ, here on Styleforum etc. There were like minded people who appreciated similar things and you could either trade of sell things to people who appreciated them.

With the rise of grailed, and a ton of facebook groups to resell stuff it has become a race to the bottom. Lowballers are out left right and center, wanting something for nothing. As a matter of personal principle I don't have a grailed account and will never have one. I see a lot of designers working with them, I NEVER will. I see stores and store owners collaborating with them and I think its just really stupid.
The whole resale market and the ability to rent designer clothing from places like rent the runway is a part of the reason why a lot of stores and designers are struggling. After all, why would people buy new goods if they can find decent used ones for sometimes less than half off?
Why would you buy even on sale when in a few months its possible for the item to pop up for cheap?
I also want to make it clear I have nothing personal against the owners of grailed, I met them early on as they were supportive of my work and they were nice guys, but...…………. I detest what the company represents and think its (and similar entities) are bad for stores and designers in the long run.
I don't share this view. The secondhand market has always existed. Many designers actually reference vintage collections for their professional work. the designers themselves buy secondhand archival pieces for their own designing uses. Enlarging the secondhand market globally is just a disruption that has affected every industry with the internet and social media. Like Uber/Airbnb etc, they have destroyed monopolistic predatory practices of local shops just like Uber made taxis less choosy and Hotel chains more competitive. Can't honestly be so against such a concept in the land of freewheeling capitalism.

A lot of local establishments prior to the internet adopted a captive customer strategy knowing full well the customer doesn't have much options and they could capitalize on it. so instead of doing a fujifilm and adapting to the loss of the monopoly, they went headon Kodak instead and strove to insist that they were better than the customer in charging those prices or burying the tech of digital cameras and insisted that film rolls will still churn the profit margins for eternity. Well, as Harry Gordon Selfridge of Selfridges' fame says, the customer is king. And no customer likes to be taken for a ride. Nothing sorrowful when fleecing businesses all come down crashing bankrupt.

A lot of designers are actually very happy with Rent the runway. for that 1 special dress they made for the runway show that in the past might only be sold to 5 or 10 customers. It now reaches an audience of 100-1000 which also means potentially 50 or more dresses made rather than just 5-10. the business of the big houses are booming. if they don't do stupid D&G stunts like call Hong Kong and Macau a separate country. Every design house/designer needs sales. And now the top has made their items more accessible to the aspirational masses. it is harder for the middle or beginning designer but this is not the view of the consumer. The consumer actually has better access to products and not being held captive by an artificially inflated price meant to keep most consumers away for exclusivity and signalling purposes.

A concept expressed here is that is mystifying is that there is something inherently wrong with buying a perfectly properly made item second hand. No there isn't. If you have something against quality made items being sold second hand, you have an issue with the original purchaser for not holding onto your work of art, if he or she even considers it a work of art. Alternatively you as a manufacturer should have considered a potential planned obsolescence of your goods. Of course this doesn't chime well with most of the anti fast fashion marketing on the media. Zara = bad = fast and furiously spoilt in 10 seconds. New designer on the market = made in the USA/JAPAN/some 1st world country which whines that it's clothing industry has been decimated by china/spain/portugal = lasts an eternity.

if your clothing items last an eternity, you should be cognizant of the fact that for the same consumer to remain loyal and generate sales for you, he or she, if lacking space and funds, may have to raise funds and make space for new high quality purchases by passing on preloved items to other folks. I don't see how rational is that to whine that the second hand market is bad. The second hand market creates more demand for the first movers to obtain fresh goods from the content creators, until the second hand market gets saturated. which is very likely the case now. So the problem right now is that the second hand market isn't buying. which means, too much goods and too much production. Now that can't really be the fault of the customer is it? It is the consumer's fault that they don't need more clothes. Come on.

lastly flipping clothes for money is never a sure thing. I am surprised people are upset that they don't get MSRP for used clothes. You pay a premium for first mover advantage, to be seen in the stuff that is to be seen in the time frame it is supposed to be seen. This is like the Disneyland Fast pass, you pay more you go first, on the same ride those who don't want to pay more will get to sit too. You can always queue normally.

There are a lot of clones in terms of clothing and accessories Brands these days. Everlane Vs Grana. Meermin vs Carmina. Taylor Stitch vs Gustin. You get the drift. The same consumer who previously had access to only GAP and banana republic now has 20 other companies to choose from. Why am I not surprised that they have all mutually cannibalised each other in the hunt for sale volume? Also online shopping has hurt the middle market by opening up the second hand luxury retail. Naturally people will trade up since they can stretch their dollar for better made goods with the social signalling as an added bonus. If any designer or store is bitter at the customers or lackthereof, they seriously have to look internally and wonder if they have assessed their market correctly. I seriously cannot believe that u can read about this sort of customers are idiots for not paying full price drivel here. Dunning Kruger effect perhaps. Your clothes aren’t worth as much as you think they should be.
 
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LA Guy

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I don't share this view. The secondhand market has always existed. Many designers actually reference vintage collections for their professional work. the designers themselves buy secondhand archival pieces for their own designing uses. Enlarging the secondhand market globally is just a disruption that has affected every industry with the internet and social media. Like Uber/Airbnb etc, they have destroyed monopolistic predatory practices of local shops just like Uber made taxis less choosy and Hotel chains more competitive. Can't honestly be so against such a concept in the land of freewheeling capitalism.

A lot of local establishments prior to the internet adopted a captive customer strategy knowing full well the customer doesn't have much options and they could capitalize on it. so instead of doing a fujifilm and adapting to the loss of the monopoly, they went headon Kodak instead and strove to insist that they were better than the customer in charging those prices or burying the tech of digital cameras and insisted that film rolls will still churn the profit margins for eternity. Well, as Harry Gordon Selfridge of Selfridges' fame says, the customer is king. And no customer likes to be taken for a ride. Nothing sorrowful when fleecing businesses all come down crashing bankrupt.

A lot of designers are actually very happy with Rent the runway. for that 1 special dress they made for the runway show that in the past might only be sold to 5 or 10 customers. It now reaches an audience of 100-1000 which also means potentially 50 or more dresses made rather than just 5-10. the business of the big houses are booming. if they don't do stupid D&G stunts like call Hong Kong and Macau a separate country. Every design house/designer needs sales. And now the top has made their items more accessible to the aspirational masses. it is harder for the middle or beginning designer but this is not the view of the consumer. The consumer actually has better access to products and not being held captive by an artificially inflated price meant to keep most consumers away for exclusivity and signalling purposes.

A concept expressed here is that is mystifying is that there is something inherently wrong with buying a perfectly properly made item second hand. No there isn't. If you have something against quality made items being sold second hand, you have an issue with the original purchaser for not holding onto your work of art, if he or she even considers it a work of art. Alternatively you as a manufacturer should have considered a potential planned obsolescence of your goods. Of course this doesn't chime well with most of the anti fast fashion marketing on the media. Zara = bad = fast and furiously spoilt in 10 seconds. New designer on the market = made in the USA/JAPAN/some 1st world country which whines that it's clothing industry has been decimated by china/spain/portugal = lasts an eternity.

if your clothing items last an eternity, you should be cognizant of the fact that for the same consumer to remain loyal and generate sales for you, he or she, if lacking space and funds, may have to raise funds and make space for new high quality purchases by passing on preloved items to other folks. I don't see how rational is that to whine that the second hand market is bad. The second hand market creates more demand for the first movers to obtain fresh goods from the content creators, until the second hand market gets saturated. which is very likely the case now. So the problem right now is that the second hand market isn't buying. which means, too much goods and too much production. Now that can't really be the fault of the customer is it? It is the consumer's fault that they don't need more clothes. Come on.

lastly flipping clothes for money is never a sure thing. I am surprised people are upset that they don't get MSRP for used clothes. You pay a premium for first mover advantage, to be seen in the stuff that is to be seen in the time frame it is supposed to be seen. This is like the Disneyland Fast pass, you pay more you go first, on the same ride those who don't want to pay more will get to sit too. You can always queue normally.

There are a lot of clones in terms of clothing and accessories Brands these days. Everlane Vs Grana. Meermin vs Carmina. Taylor Stitch vs Gustin. You get the drift. The same consumer who previously had access to only GAP and banana republic now has 20 other companies to choose from. Why am I not surprised that they have all mutually cannibalised each other in the hunt for sale volume? Also online shopping has hurt the middle market by opening up the second hand luxury retail. Naturally people will trade up since they can stretch their dollar for better made goods with the social signalling as an added bonus. If any designer or store is bitter at the customers or lackthereof, they seriously have to look internally and wonder if they have assessed their market correctly. I seriously cannot believe that u can read about this sort of customers are idiots for not paying full price drivel here. Dunning Kruger effect perhaps. Your clothes aren’t worth as much as you think they should be.
Not saying anything about grailed, but Uber and AirBnB are absolutely predatory, to the consumer, the providers, and the communities in which they exist. Uber's business plan is predicated on saving a ton of money because they don't have any "employee" drivers, though their policies basically make their contractors such. AriBnBs lead to residental areas being bought up by commercial entities for unlicensed hotels in areas that are not zoned for commercial use, and the property taxes are commensurate with private residency rather than commercial use, and there is very little in the way of safety regulations to protect either the customers or the providers.

The "disruptive" industries are a joke, generally speaking, and the sharing economies particularly so.
 

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